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The 10 Most Puzzling Ancient Artifacts

The 10 Most Puzzling Ancient Artifacts
The Bible tells us that God created Adam and Eve just a few thousand years ago, by some fundamentalist interpretations. Science informs us that this is mere fiction and that man is a few million years old, and that civilization just tens of thousands of years old. Could it be, however, that conventional science is just as mistaken as the Bible stories? There is a great deal of archeological evidence that the history of life on earth might be far different than what current geological and anthropological texts tell us. The Grooved Spheres Over the last few decades, miners in South Africa have been digging up mysterious metal spheres. The Dropa Stones In 1938, an archeological expedition led by Dr. The Ica StonesBeginning in the 1930s, the father of Dr. The Antikythera MechanismA perplexing artifact was recovered by sponge-divers from a shipwreck in 1900 off the coast of Antikythera, a small island that lies northwest of Crete. Ancient Model Aircraft Impossible Fossils

Warp Drives Might Be More Realistic Than Thought | Wired Science A ring-shaped warp drive device could transport a football-shape starship (center) to effective speeds faster than light. Image: Harold White/NASA By Ian Steadman, Wired UK NASA scientists now think that the famous warp drive concept is a realistic possibility, and that in the far future humans could regularly travel faster than the speed of light. [partner id="wireduk" align="right"]A warp drive would work by “warping” spacetime around any spaceship, which physicist Miguel Alcubierre showed was theoretically possible in 1994, albeit well beyond the current technical capabilities of humanity. However, any such Alcubierre drive was assumed to require more energy — equivalent to the mass-energy of the whole planet of Jupiter – than could ever possibly be supplied, rendering it impossible to build. But now scientists believe that those requirements might not be so vast, making warp travel a tangible possibility. In the universe of Star Trek, the warp drive was invented in 2063.

Nine Things Successful People Do Differently Learn more about the science of success with Heidi Grant Halvorson’s HBR Single, based on this blog post. Why have you been so successful in reaching some of your goals, but not others? If you aren’t sure, you are far from alone in your confusion. 1. To seize the moment, decide when and where you will take each action you want to take, in advance. 3. Fortunately, decades of research suggest that the belief in fixed ability is completely wrong — abilities of all kinds are profoundly malleable. The good news is, if you aren’t particularly gritty now, there is something you can do about it. 7. To build willpower, take on a challenge that requires you to do something you’d honestly rather not do. 8. 9. If you want to change your ways, ask yourself, What will I do instead? It is my hope that, after reading about the nine things successful people do differently, you have gained some insight into all the things you have been doing right all along.

The Piri Reis map In 1929, a group of historians found an amazing map drawn on a gazelle skin. Research showed that it was a genuine document drawn in 1513 by Piri Reis, a famous admiral of the Turkish fleet in the sixteenth century. His passion was cartography. His high rank within the Turkish navy allowed him to have a privileged access to the Imperial Library of Constantinople. The Turkish admiral admits in a series of notes on the map that he compiled and copied the data from a large number of source maps, some of which dated back to the fourth century BC or earlier. The Controversy Click here to see large version of the map The Piri Reis map shows the western coast of Africa, the eastern coast of South America, and the northern coast of Antarctica. On 6th July 1960 the U. 6, July, 1960Subject: Admiral Piri Reis MapTO: Prof. Dear Professor Hapgood,Your request of evaluation of certain unusual features of the Piri Reis map of 1513 by this organization has been reviewed. Harold Z. Dr.

Space Sugar Discovered Around Sun-Like Star What a sweet cosmic find! Sugar molecules have been found in the gas surrounding a young sun-like star, suggesting that some of the building blocks of life may actually be present even as alien planets are still forming in the system. The young star, called IRAS 16293-2422, is part of a binary (or two-star) system. It has a similar mass to the sun and is located about 400 light-years away in the constellation of Ophiuchus. The sugar molecules, known as glycolaldehyde, have previously been detected in interstellar space, but according to the researchers, this is the first time they have been spotted so close to a sun-like star. In fact, the molecules are about the same distance away from the star as the planet Uranus is from our sun. [Slideshow: Stunning earth features seen from space] Glycolaldehyde can react with a substance called propenal to form ribose, which is a major component of RNA, or ribonucleic acid. View gallery [Slideshow: Dazzling distant planets]

How I Know I Love You I know I love you because I want to get you soup when you’re sick. Not only do I want to get it for you, I want to make it for you so you can eat something made with love instead of with crushed insects and preservatives. I know I love you because I want to slap anyone who hurts you, even if it’s your boss. I want to hold you when you’re having a nightmare and kiss the spot that hurts when you bump into something. I know I love you because I want you to be healthy even when you’re not sick, and that’s why I keep bugging you to change your crappy eating ways even though I know you’re over hearing about it. I know I love you because I worry about the stuff only people who love you worry about, like the amount of quality sleep you get a night and how much you drink when you’re sad and whether you’re getting enough vitamin B. I know I love you because I think you’re beautiful even when you’re not. I know I love you because I can’t abandon you, not even when you’re being a dick.

10 Mysteries That Hint At Forgotten Advanced Civilizations Mysteries Prehistory literally means the time “before we had written records” (roughly the time before the 4th Century BC) and ancient history is the time since our recorded history. Our concept of ancient history was originally firmly determined by the bible. Written from an insular point of view, the histories of some ancient cultures were distorted, badly neglected or even omitted. The existence of inexplicable monuments, certain man-made marvels and archaeological finds pertaining to our ancient- and prehistory, are leading more and more archaeologists to believe long forgotten advanced civilizations existed. As most of our ancient records were lost during the destruction of the great libraries, the following genuine mysteries are the only remnants of their existence. Ancient knowledge was a lot more refined and developed than we have been taught hitherto. Despite wars and several invasions, India’s ancient history was largely preserved.

Mysterious Polar Bear Death Linked to Zebra Herpes In 2010 at the Wuppertal Zoo in Germany, brain inflammation killed one female polar bear, Jerka, and sickened her male companion, Lars, whom veterinarians were able to save. Brain-swelling disease, or encephalitis, can be caused by many pathogens. But after investigating samples from Jerka, Lars and nine other polar bears researchers believe they have identified the culprit: a mishmash virus that originated in zebras. The bear-killing virus appears to have emerged when a portion of equine herpes virus transferred a portion of its genetic code — one known for its role in causing disease that affects the nervous system — into a second equine herpes virus, researchers say. This conclusion raises many questions. And, of course, how did the polar bears at Wuppertal Zoo catch the virus? The zebras are housed 223 feet (68 meters) from polar bears and are not cared for by the same zookeepers.

2012 March 12 - The Scale of the Universe Interactive Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2012 March 12 The Scale of the Universe - Interactive Flash Animation Credit & Copyright: Cary & Michael Huang Explanation: What does the universe look like on small scales? Tomorrow's picture: dust before galaxies Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD at NASA / GSFC& Michigan Tech.

The Guy who Digs up Lost Cities buried at Sea F or the last thirteen years, he’s been busy digging up a lost underwater civilization the size of Paris off the coast of Egypt. The remarkably well-preserved ruins discovered have been sitting at the bottom of the Mediterranean sea for the past 1,200 years, at long last solving the mystery of the lost cities of Alexandria’s ancient eastern harbour, Portus Magnus. Not bad for a day job. All photos ©Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation, photographed by Christoph Gerigk Frenchman Franck Goddio is our man, a pioneer of modern maritime archeology who has wanderlust running in his veins. The grandson of the inventor of the modern catamaran, Eric de Bishop, and specialist of ancient navigational routes in the South Pacific, before pulling up Pharoah’s heads from the seabed, Franck was a finance guy, an advisor to governments and United Nations. He founded the Institut Européen d’Archéologie Sous-Marine (IEASM) and put together a team of divers, archaeologists, scientists and other experts.

- StumbleUpon It’s a dying art, struck down by text, email and messaging. So can we be taught how to talk to each other? Perhaps it was the opium talking, but Thomas de Quincey once wrote that an evening in the company of Samuel Coleridge was “like some great river”. The poet “swept at once into a continuous strain of dissertation, certainly the most novel, the most finely illustrated, and traversing the most spacious fields of thought, by transitions the most just and logical, that it was possible to conceive”. Most of us have hopefully felt the unmoored elation of staying up all night talking with a friend or a lover. What makes a good conversationalist has changed little over the years. And so I found myself one cold Tuesday evening in February talking to complete strangers, nibbling on vegetable quiche and sipping blackcurrant cordial. Another pupil shuffled over and kindly invited me into her circle. My classmates also spoke of more personal reasons for their attendance.

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