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How to eat wild stuff and not get poisoned (how-to)

How to eat wild stuff and not get poisoned (how-to)
Let's play pretend for a moment. Are you with me? Let's pretend you can't go down to the supermarket for food to eat. In fact, let's pretend that there is not a supermarket for one hundred miles in any direction, and you don't have any food with you. Does this seem unlikely? What this guide is:This is a guide to wild things that are 100% safe to eat. What this guide is not:This is NOT a guide to figuring out if something may or may not be safe to eat. BerriesThis is very easy to make 100% foolproof. Unless you are completely sure, do not eat non-aggregate berries - berries that are shaped like blueberries or gooseberries. Green StuffMost "green stuff" is not outright toxic, but can definitely cause you some distress. Note: You should use caution when eating any plant, particularly plants found in the water - they can harbor any creepy crawly that may have been living in the water, including giardia cryptosporidium among others. CrittersNever eat wild critters raw!

5 Ideas for Fire Tinder A while ago I asked readers Do You Have 5 Ways to Make Fire? The article concentrated on fire starters; steel and flight, lighters, and a few less common systems. However, most of those will be useless for building a fire if you don’t have some tinder to put the flame to. Here are 5 great ideas for fire tinder, both natural and homemade. 1. Everybody can collect it for free, and even get it from the bottom of your pockets in a pinch. 2. Collect the stringy shavings from the bark of a cedar tree for the best (in my opinion) natural fire tinder. 3. This might be the oldest survivalist trick in the book. 4. Obviously these won’t be available in all areas, but when you can find them the light feathery material inside cattails is like burning paper or cotton. 5. Like cedar, just shave some bark off of a birch tree. Two great products to keep in your Bug Out Bag are “WetFire” and “Fire Paste“. What do you use? I know these are just the tip of the iceberg for survival fire tender.

Constrictor knot History[edit] First called "constrictor knot" in Clifford Ashley's 1944 work The Ashley Book of Knots, this knot likely dates back much further.[5] Although Ashley seemed to imply that he had invented the constrictor knot over 25 years before publishing The Ashley Book of Knots,[1] research indicates that he was not its originator.[6] Ashley's publication of the knot did bring it to wider attention.[7] Although the description is not entirely without ambiguity, the constrictor knot is thought to have appeared under the name "gunner's knot" in the 1866 work The Book of Knots,[8][9] written under the pseudonym Tom Bowling.[10] in relation to the clove hitch, which he illustrated and called the "builder's knot". He wrote, "The Gunner's knot (of which we do not give a diagram) only differs from the builder's knot, by the ends of the cords being simply knotted before being brought from under the loop which crosses them. Tying[edit] The method shown below is the most basic way to tie the knot.

The Great Big Narcotics Cookbook sign up Login Paper Key Courses Members Papers Navigate Most popular Newest Most liked Papers Type All Abstract Article Assignment Book Cheatsheet Exam Lecture Notes Presentation Research Terms Textbook Solutions Go by language All Languages English Español Deutsch Français Italiano Nederlands 日本語 עברית Polski Português Русский 中文 Other | All Institutes View Results from my Institute only | Finding The Right Beans For A Great Cup Of Coffee By Thijmen Sloth , On October 6, 2012 Views: 219 Main Category: Education Tags: Get Better With These Self Help Proposals By Sheldon Houmann , On October 6, 2012 Views: 180 Main Category: Agriculture and Related Sciences Fill Your Mug With Something Tasty Today Views: 167 Tags: cat civet coffee kopi luwak poop Alternative Emergency Care By Henderson Lindgren , On October 6, 2012 Views: 203 Emergency Dentist and Urgent Care Dental Facilities Views: 163 Tags: care Charlotte City Creek dentist emergency hickory Medical memphis Missouri NC treatment tx urgent Tips And Hints On Combating A Bad Hair Day Views: 252

The Fantastic Four – 4 Essential Wild Edible Plants that May Just Save Your Life Did you realize that knowing just 4 wild edible plants could one day save your life? If there were any four categories of plants that I would recommend all people to know how to use and identify it would be these: Grass, Oak, Pine, and Cattail. For the knowledgeable survivor, knowing just these four plants can make the difference between life and death if stranded in the wilds – for each one is an excellent food source which can sustain you until help arrives. Throughout this week and part of the next, I’ll be going into details on how you can prepare and eat these plants. Grass Surprising to many is the fact that you can eat grass. The young shoots up to 6 inches tall can be eaten raw and the starchy base (usually white and at the bottom when you pluck it) can be eaten as a trail nibble. The best part of the grass plant to eat are the seed heads, which can be gathered to make millet for breads or filler for soups & stews. Oak Pine “You can eat pine?!” Cattail Conclusion

How To Be A World-Class Survivalist in 5 Simple Steps Joy Paley Activist Post With the recent econopocalypse, it’s no wonder that people are becoming more interested in what it would take to survive after our current society has undergone a major shift. After all, if something we thought was intrinsically stable—our financial sector, and the guarantee of ever increasing wealth—is actually pretty flimsy, well, a lot of other things can be brought into question too. Take out a seemingly small piece of the puzzle, like access to gasoline, and you find that your local grocery will run out of goods within 2 days. Learning the basic skills to survive without the modern conveniences of society is a way to prepare yourself for these unpredictable shifts. 1. 2. 3. • Stock up a pantry of canned goods—think beans, tuna, veggies, fruit, and soups • Get bulk basics like oil, sugar, salt, peanut butter, rice, lentils, and any other grains you prefer • Pick up a rechargeable LED flashlight 4. 5.

BASIC LIST OF SUGGESTED ITEMS FOR LONG TERM SURVIVAL Some people are saying we should prepare for at least 7 days, but the way things go after a hurricane, tornado, floods, loss of electricity and the fact that these disasters will continue and perhaps even get worse in coming years according to trends, one week is not enough. Some have said 7 years, but that seems too long so do what you can. Be sure to use the older stocked goods first and replace them with new. Otherwise you will end up with all old food you might not even want to eat. Always check canned tomatoes for spoilage, as even in the can they can spoil. 1. Homeland Security recommends 7 days for survival, but in recent years, some people don't have electricity or heat for up to 3 weeks, so to be really safe - plan for at least 3 weeks. 2. Note: I have received arguments that boiling for longer than 5 minutes will just waste good water, but 15 minutes is safer to kill Cryptospiridium. 3. Wheat - 300 lbs. Rice - 100 lbs. Beans, Peas, Lentils, 50 lbs. each Honey or Sugar - 60 lbs.

s Homemade Soap Recipe by Robert Wayne Atkins Grandpappy's Homemade Soap Recipe Copyright © 2007,2008 by Robert Wayne Atkins, P.E. All rights reserved and all rights protected under international copyright law. Click Here for a Microsoft WORD printer friendly copy of this article. Introduction During hard times sooner or later everyone runs out of soap. To make soap you only need three things: rainwater,cold ashes from any hardwood fire, andanimal fat from almost any type of animal, such as a cow, pig, goat, sheep, bear, beaver, raccoon, opossum, groundhog, etc. Soap is not difficult to make and it does not require any special equipment. Soap is a "perfect consumer product" for the following five reasons: Soap is a legal product.Everyone everywhere uses soap.Soap is completely used up in a short period of time.When people run out of soap they want to buy more.Soap is relatively low in price so almost everyone can afford it. There are three major differences between homemade soap and commercial quality soap: Basic Soap Making Equipment

How to Stock Your Wet Bar - The International Association of Drunk Bastards Survival Foods: Cattail, Conifers, Grasses & Acorns Ever wondered what kinds of survival foods you could eat if you were caught in a survival situation? When I first came to Washington state all I could see was a wall of green plants. I knew nothing about what I could and could not eat if I were to get lost in the woods. Where Can I Find Cattails and How Do I Eat Them? Cattails can be delicious if prepared correctly. Cattail does have a look-alike, the iris. Cattails are almost always in or next to a water source. Young shoots are the tastiest part of the plant. Munching From Conifers Did you know that many types of conifer trees are edible? Survival Foods: The Grass Family More than 400 types of grasses can be eaten worldwide. Edible grasses include: bent, wheat, slough, brome, crab, switch, canary, timothy, blue and bristle grasses. Gathering Acorns Acorns are found on oak trees. I hope this provided a look into the edible possibilities of the natural world. Sources: Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast.

Homemade MREs For quite a while now, I've wanted to make up my own "MREs" for my Get Home Bag (GHB). I was recently out scouting some properties, and realized that my GHB only had some packs of tuna and some candy in them. I had broken my own Cardinal Rule - If you use it, replace it immediately. So, I went about making up some MRE packages. I assembled my "ingredients" based on "Best By" date, calories and protein content. The idea was to put long-life food together and vacuum seal it in a FoodSaver bag. For my first MRE, here's what I included - It includes: One individual serving of Beef-a-roni, 2 ounces (by weight - about 1/2 cup) of dry roasted peanuts, one pack of Land-o-Lakes French Vanilla cappuccio, one Promax energy bar, 4 pieces of Jolly Rancher hard candy, and utensiles (plastic spoon, knife and 2 napkins). Since the peanuts were loose, I wanted to separate them in the pouch. I then filled that with the peanuts and sealed it. Here are the stats - Here's the result - Times have changed!

CHEROKEE DICTIONARY INDEX Manataka American Indian Council There are 3,500 words and phrases on these five pages Each of the 85 letter characters in Cherokee (Tsa-la-gi) represents a unique sound of the soft and flowing language. Cherokee is a beautiful language full of colorful sounds, easily given to rousing oratory, poetry and song. The Cherokee (Tsa-la-gi) words are spelled like they are pronounced and likewise, words are pronounced as they are spelled. The language has 6 vowels and 17 consonants. a = as in bark e = as in late i = as the e in beat o = as the o in wrote u = as the double o in boot v = as the u in nut. All words begin with a consonant and end with a long or short vowel except the 'S' sound. Syllables qua, que, quo, quu and quv are pronounced with a "kw" sound before each vowel. Syllables beginning with the letter "d" are pronounced as in the English, but approach a "t" sound; do, du, and dv sound like to, tu and tv in some words. "ti" syllables are sometimes pronounced "di." Back to Index

Wild Food School - Urban Foraging Guide & eBooks Urban Foraging & Cornwall Forager Guides - FREE Foraging for food - even in a city - can be fun. But where do you start? This Foraging Guide is in PDF format and is designed to allow you to print out the pictures on standard 10 x 15 cm. photo paper and then bind them together (laminate the pages if you want). Correctly printed out you will find plant picture and text side by side like the example below. Click wfsURBFORAGER.pdf to downloador right click and Save. ** If you're more interested in dealing with food and water in disaster and emergency survival situations (also in urban areas) you might like to take a look at the new book Armageddon Kitchen and Doomsday Kitchen over on this page >>> ... There are also a 98 page TROPICAL FORAGING GUIDE [approx. 8Mb] plus the Cornish Foraging and a Riverside Foraging guide. See also the exciting range of Wild Food WISDOM Cooking with Weeds™ eBooks at wildfoodwisdom.co.uk Wild Food School Homepage

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