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Polymaps

http://polymaps.org/

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How to Zoom and Pan with SVG This topic shows you how to use Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) to zoom and pan, and ends with an example of a complex organizational chart that can be zoomed and panned. Basic HTML and JavaScript knowledge are assumed, as well as access to a browser that can render inline SVG in HTML5, such as Windows Internet Explorer 9 and later. Introduction From Paper Maps to the Web: A DIY Digital Maps Primer Leer versión en español Lire en Français I was invited to the National Library of Colombia’s 2nd Digital Book Week as a speaker and to give a workshop on digital mapping tools.

Consensus reality Consensus reality[1][2] is that which is generally agreed to be reality, based on a consensus view. The difficulty with the question stems from the concern that human beings do not in fact fully understand or agree upon the nature of knowledge or ontology, and therefore it is not possible to be certain beyond doubt what is real.[3][4] Accordingly, this line of logic concludes, we cannot in fact be sure beyond doubt about the nature of reality. We can, however, seek to obtain some form of consensus, with others, of what is real. How To Build an Interactive Map with Open-Source Tools My interactive migration map for Forbes, showing inbound (blue) and outbound (red) migration to and from Maricopa County, Arizona My latest interactive migration map on Forbes.com improves on the previous version in a few ways: it’s got five years of data instead of one; a brand-new layout; and some much-requested features like a search tool and the ability to switch off the lines. But the upgrade that I’m most excited about is in the code: I built the map using nothing but open-source software, from Python and MySQL to handle the data right down to JavaScript to display the map. I’ve been steadily moving much of my data handling to Python and MySQL, but this is the first map I’ve made using JavaScript, and interactive JS maps are still rare elsewhere, too. The previous map was built in Flash, and I used some other proprietary software to handle the data and tweak the presentation.

Photobox - CSS3 image gallery modal viewer A lightweight image gallery modal window script which uses only CSS3 for silky-smooth animations and transitions, utilizes GPU rending, which can be completely controlled and themed directly from the CSS. Lightweight! jquery.photobox.js is only 5kb (gziped & minified) Hardware accelerated, CSS3 transitions and animations Mobile friendly Support videos via iframe embedding Stunning UI and user-friendly UX Images & videos can be zoomed using mousewheel Thumbnails can be zoomed using mousewheel Keyboard & mouse navigation. Even using mousewheel left/right ;-) Exposed UX control up to 99%. No need to mess with the source code Observes DOM changes (if images were added/removed) Event-delegation on all thumbnails events (obviously...) HTML5 History support: update location with the currently viewed image No images at all!

Tropes: Text Analysis and Semantics Analysis of written or spoken texts requires that certain questions should be asked with regard to certain objectives. To obtain answers to these questions, texts must be reduced as far as possible to their essentials. Designed for Information Science, Market Research, Sociological Analysis and Scientific studies, Tropes is a Natural Language Processing and Semantic Classification software that guarantees pertinence and quality in Text Analysis.

Can I legally share this map? Copyrights of maps. A map is worth a thousand words, every map lover knows that. Many of us share maps on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and blogs like Geoaweosmeness write about them. But are we allowed to do that? Maps should be treaded like any other intellectual property or a piece of art. As a general rule, you can’t publish a map or an image which is not owned by you without the permission of the author or the owner, unless the image is covered by something like a Creative Commons license used by OpenStreetMap.

Introduction What is Arduino? Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open-source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board. Arduino can be used to develop interactive objects, taking inputs from a variety of switches or sensors, and controlling a variety of lights, motors, and other physical outputs. Arduino projects can be stand-alone, or they can communicate with software running on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP.)

Data Driven Journalism Originally published by Andy Kirk on Visualising Data, 1 May 2011. This article is republished with permission. This is the fourth part of a multi-part series designed to share with readers an inspiring collection of the most important, effective, useful and practical data visualisation resources. The series will cover visualisation tools, resources for sourcing and handling data, online learning tutorials, visualisation blogs, visualisation books and academic papers. Our 50 Favorite Web Development Resources from 2012 Let’s keep it simple: last year, we did a roundup of 50 of the most useful web development resources. Today, we bring to you the 2012 edition, but only better. And what can you expect to find in this years roundup? Pretty much everything a developer could ever need: CSS frameworks & tools, HTML5 resources, JavaScript frameworks & tools, web editors, mock-up tools, application frameworks, responsive layout tools and resources… and on and on. This post does not include any jQuery resources as we published its own round-up last week, you can check it out here Top 50 Useful jQuery Plugins from 2011.

Video Tapestries with Continuous Temporal Zoom ACM Transactions on Graphics (Proc. SIGGRAPH), August 2010 A multiscale tapestry represents an input video as a seamless and zoomable summary image which can be used to navigate through the video. This visualization eliminates hard borders between frames, providing spatial continuity and also continuous zooms to finer temporal resolutions. This figure depicts three discrete scale levels for the film Elephants Dream (Courtesy of the Blender Foundation).

5 books and atlases you need to have on your map shelf We love maps. Since you’re reading that post you must be a map addict as well. Our spatial obsession makes us not only make maps, use maps, play with maps and write about them.

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