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Map Warper: Home

Map Warper: Home
The NYPL Map Warper is a tool for digitally aligning ("rectifying") historical maps from the NYPL's collections to match today's precise maps. Visitors can browse already rectified maps or assist the NYPL by aligning a map. Play the video above to tour the site and learn how to rectify a map yourself. Everyone is welcome to participate! Recipient of the 2012 Cutting Edge Technology in Library Services Award from the Office of Information Policy of the American Library Association

http://maps.nypl.org/warper/

Related:  Data geoutile !Cartografia

List of GIS data sources This is a list of GIS data sources that provide information sets that can be used in geographic information systems (GIS) and spatial databases for purposes of geospatial analysis and cartographic mapping. This list categorizes the sources by location of interest. Global[edit] National Geologic Map Database HomeCatalogLexiconMapViewStandardsComments Find Us: Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

argyle knitwear (Texture) This is one of over 5262 textures generated by Filter Forge, a Photoshop plugin that allows you to create your own filters. With Filter Forge, you can: change the look of this texture easily; browse through its 30,000 variations; get a normal map for a 3D model. Download Filter Forge to use this texture To open this filter, you must have Filter Forge 1.0 or higher installed on your computer.

1746 map of London now available as an incredibly detailed Google map The Centre for Metropolitan History and Museum of London Archaeology wanted a map that could help them visualise data from the 18th and 19th centuries. They started by taking John Rocque’s 1746 map of London, putting the 24 parts together, then georeferencing it. (For non-cartographers, georeferencing is “the process by which an electronic image of the earth is located on to the earth in the right place, so that the features it depicts overlie the same features shown on a current measured reality”.) The results were overlaid onto a Google map, and voila! You can travel through London as it was in 1746, and, as a added bonus, see the differences between then and now by moving the StreetView icon around. Example: in 1746, Southwark was mainly a giant field, but look at all the blue lines on top of it!

Importing 100 years of climate change into R This is a flashback post, I was working on species distribution shifts over the last 40 years last summer and recently Rémi Genevest contacted me asking me how I managed to import the CRU TS 1.2 dataset into R. As always a more readable version of the code can be found here. At that time I used a not very elegant coding involving SpatialPixels and SpatilGridDataFrame, scrolling back to the question I asked to the R-sig-geo mailing list back then I stumbles across the answer from Robert Hijmans that I did not take into account at that time. Now one year after I found his answer going in the right direction and made some heavy change in the coding. #the standard deviation in temperature for the years 1901 and 2000 sd_100<-stack(calc(temp[[grep("1901",names(temp))]],sd),calc(temp[[grep("2000",names(temp))]],sd)) plot(sd_100) The only mathematical magic involve here is changing the row numbers.

Grunge Photoshop brush roundup We’ll be starting a regular series of roundups of the best free Photoshop brushes, in various themes; this week’s Photoshop brush roundup is on the Grunge theme. Grunge is a very bold style choice, and is characterized by its gritty style, dark, washed-out colors, and irregular shapes. Grunge textures can be so varied, from wood to metallic surfaces, fabric, paper and more as far as textures go, but also characterizing themselves by sharp cuts, or slow fades. They are all very similar in style, but offer subtle variations which can be used in conjunction with other similar or contrasting textures to create depth and wear. Double Circle

Cartographies of Time: A Visual History of the Timeline by Maria Popova A chronology of one of our most inescapable metaphors, or what Macbeth has to do with Galileo. I was recently asked to select my all-time favorite books for the lovely Ideal Bookshelf project by The Paris Review’s Thessaly la Force and artist Jane Mount. Natural Spaces - Scottish Natural Heritage Apologies for any inconvenience, but we are having technical problems with the login and download functionality. Our team is working on resolving this issue, please try again later. Natural Spaces provides an online data download facility giving access to a wide range of datasets including protected areas, habitats and species, landscape, open space and access.

12 Maps That Changed the World "All cultures have always believed that the map they valorize is real and true and objective and transparent," Brotton, a professor of Renaissance studies at Queen Mary University of London, told me. "All maps are always subjective.... Even today’s online geospatial applications on all your mobile devices and tablets, be they produced by Google or Apple or whoever, are still to some extent subjective maps." There are, in other words, no perfect maps—just maps that (more-or-less) perfectly capture our understanding of the world at discrete moments in time. In his new book, A History of the World in 12 Maps, Brotton masterfully catalogs the maps that tell us most about pivotal periods in human history. I asked him to walk me through the 12 maps he selected (you can click on each map below to enlarge it).

Related:  Historia