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Ofsted 2012: Questioning to promote learning — From Good to Outstanding

Ofsted 2012: Questioning to promote learning — From Good to Outstanding
Have you ever noticed that often, when someone is being interviewed, they say “That’s a good question.”? It’s usually when it’s a question they can’t answer quickly and easily. Indeed, “good” questions are ones that generally need thinking about. Inspectors must consider whether: “teachers use questioning and discussion to assess the effectiveness of their teaching and promote pupils’ learning” School inspection handbook from September 2012 Notice, in this instance it does not say “ASSESS” learning, although clearly this is undeniably a major purpose for questioning. Questions that are easy to answer don’t move learning on; they might indicate that learning has happened, or that at least something has been noticed, thought about or memorised, but they don’t promote learning. How do questions promote learning? Questioning can fail because: Questioning succeeds when: What kinds of questions do you routinely ask, and how do you ask them ? E.g. E.g. T: How might you describe a hexagon? E.g. Applying Related:  Learninginteractive teaching

How The Memory Works In Learning How The Memory Works In Learning By Dr. Judy Willis, M.D., M.Ed. Teachers are the caretakers of the development of students’ highest brain during the years of its most extensive changes. As such, they have the privilege and opportunity to influence the quality and quantity of neuronal and connective pathways so all children leave school with their brains optimized for future success. This introduction to the basics of the neuroscience of learning includes information that should be included in all teacher education programs. Teaching Grows Brain Cells IQ is not fixed at birth and brain development and intelligence are “plastic” in that internal and environmental stimuli constantly change the structure and function of neurons and their connections. It was once believed that brain cell growth stops after age twenty. High Stress Restricts Brain Processing to the Survival State Memory is Constructed and Stored by Patterning Memory is Sustained by Use The Future References Ashby, C.

Knowing Our Students as Learners Today, research and experience in increasingly global classrooms are revealing the complex interplay of factors that influence a student's learning. Educators understand that the business of coming to know our students as learners is simply too important to leave to chance—and that the peril of not undertaking this inquiry is not reaching a learner at all. The story of our friend Arthur is a reminder of the consequences of ignoring a student's unique learning circumstances. Arthur: Dropping in from Another Planet Arthur was born in the Dutch West Indies, now Indonesia, and had just seen his sixth birthday when the Japanese invaded. For the duration of the war, Arthur, his parents, and his siblings were interred in a Japanese concentration camp in West Java. Given the amount of schooling that he had missed, Arthur was placed in a class with children three years younger than himself. Because I was behind in my reading, the teacher treated me as she would a much younger child.

Socratic Questions | PCET.NET Socrates was one of the greatest educators who taught by asking questions and thus drawing out (as ‘ex duco’, meaning to ‘lead out’, which is the root of ‘education’) answers from his pupils. Rather stupidly, he martyred himself by drinking hemlock rather than compromise his principles. Bold, but not a good survival strategy. Here are the six types of questions that Socrates asked his pupils. The overall purpose, by the way, is to challenge accuracy and completeness of thinking in a way that acts to move people towards their ultimate goal. Conceptual clarification questions Get them to think more about what exactly they are asking or thinking about. Why are you saying that? Probing assumptions Probing of assumptions makes them think about the presuppositions and unquestioned beliefs on which they are founding their argument. What else could we assume? Why is that happening? Questioning viewpoints and perspectives Most arguments are given from a particular position.

He's not the messiah .. - news Comment:5 average rating | Comments (2)Last Updated:23 September, 2012Section:news … but for many policymakers he comes close. John Hattie, possibly the world’s most influential education academic, has the ear of governments everywhere. Professor John Hattie is, quietly, one of the most divisive figures in world education. For someone reputed to be unafraid to speak his mind, Hattie is remarkably blase about both points of view. So what is it that has made Hattie - often referred to the world’s most important educational researcher - the focus of such global attention and controversy? Speaking from Australia, where he has been director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne since March 2011, Hattie initially comes across as relaxed and laid back. It is this characteristic outspokenness that has galvanised many of Hattie’s fiercest critics. Hattie’s confidence in his statements is well founded. Following the evidence “There are critics out there.

Home | Global Digital Citizen Foundation Revision techniques - the good, the OK and the useless 17 May 2013Last updated at 21:34 ET By Deborah Cohen Health Check, BBC World Service It's the time of year where students are poring over their books, trying to ensure they are prepared for their exams. Revision charts, highlighter pens and sticky notes around the room are some of the methods people use to ensure information stays in their mind. But now psychologists in the US warn many favourite revision techniques will not lead to exam success. Universities, schools and colleges offer students a variety of ways to help them remember the content of their courses and get good grades. These include re-reading notes, summarising them and highlighting the important points. Others involve testing knowledge and using mnemonics - ways of helping recall facts and lists, or creating visual representations of the knowledge. But teachers do not know enough about how memory works and therefore which techniques are most effective, according to Prof John Dunlovsky, of Kent State University. Plan ahead

Socratic Questioning Techniques > Questioning > Socratic Questions Conceptual | Assumptions | Rationale | Viewpoint | Implications | Question | See also Socrates was one of the greatest educators who taught by asking questions and thus drawing out answers from his pupils ('ex duco', means to 'lead out', which is the root of 'education'). Sadly, he martyred himself by drinking hemlock rather than compromise his principles. Here are the six types of questions that Socrates asked his pupils. The overall purpose of Socratic questioning, is to challenge accuracy and completeness of thinking in a way that acts to move people towards their ultimate goal. Conceptual clarification questions Get them to think more about what exactly they are asking or thinking about. Why are you saying that? Probing assumptions Probing their assumptions makes them think about the presuppositions and unquestioned beliefs on which they are founding their argument. What else could we assume? Probing rationale, reasons and evidence

6 different ways of getting student feedback in your iPad lesson. Update 14-09-2012: Syncing Notability with Dropbox is possibly the easiest and best way of keeping track of your students’ work. One of the most difficult challenges for the teachers at my school is changing from workbooks and worksheets to get students to work and monitor their answers on the iPad. There are many ways to go about it. 1. This one, is my go to tool form creating questionnaires. 2. In my mentor class last year there were almost no students who did not have a twitter account. 3. Socrative allows you to fire questions at students in a game like setting. 4. iBooks Widgets I’ve previously written a post about making worksheets in iBooks. 5. Nearpod is the most advanced educational app I have used yet. 6. Keynote is often overlooked as a workbook app. Related posts:

Mnemonic Dictionary - Fun and easy way to build your vocabulary! Ed-U-Like: DIFFERENTIATION Part 2: What it probably is So, it might be a slightly simplistic argument, but we can perhaps start making the links between what differentiation is, what it’s not and why by paring a lesson down into its simplest form. And this means reviewing the stuff that we might have thought of as being ‘differentiation’ previously and reconsidering it. As you may have hopefully read in my previous blogpost here, I think that differentiation is not: A box to tick as the last consideration on your lesson planA box for someone else to tick when they are observing you as an add-on3 or 5 or 79 levels of worksheets that have taken longer to prepare than copying out the catalogue by handSomething that requires said worksheets to be wheeled out every year when the lesson or schemes are taught without any thought as to whether they suit the learners in that classSomething that is ‘not needed’ because your school sets by abilitySo what is it then? Ta-dah! And in that vein, here are some strategies that can make this happen. Literacy

Questions Where would I be without Twitter? I have decided to elaborate on this AfL strategy, following this tweet from my @TeacherToolkit account on #ukedchat 3.11.11. My tweet said "#ukedchat Missed out tonight, look forward to reading ideas. My favourite T&L strategy at the moment is "Pose, Pause...Pounce, Bounce" #AfL". Firstly, this concept is not mine. So it is at this point, where I will be honourable and credit a colleague who I think has a money-spinning idea here. The fabulous Mrs Pam Fearnley delivered the session. What is it? It is a simple, yet sophisticated, AfL (Assessment for Learning) questioning technique to help teachers move from good-to-outstanding. Why is it useful? For many reasons. The strategy encouraged teachers to take risks and tease out the "learning" in class. How does it work? I have listed the four-part approach below with additional information that I hope explains the method. • Give the context of your approach to the class. This is the hard part. Explore! 1. 2. 3.

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