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Linkers and connectors - English Subject Area

Linkers and connectors - English Subject Area
Contrast . In spite of / Despite Link two contrasting ideas. Followed by a noun phrase. . Although / (Even) though Link two contrasting ideas. . . . . Reason and cause . . Purpose . . Consequence . . . Addition . . . For example / For instance Introduces an example referring to previously stated ideas. . . but / yet: followed by a noun phrase or a sentence. ‘The book is short but / yet interesting’ . in spite of / despite: It is placed at the beginning or in the middle of the sentence. ‘He arrived on time despite / in spite of getting up late’ although / though/ even though / in spite of the fact that: followed by a complete sentence. ‘Although / though / even though / in spite of the fact that the pupils had not studied, they all passed their exams’. . however, nevertheless, even so, on the one hand, on the other hand, on the contrary: ‘He was quite ill however/ nevertheless/ even so, he went to school’ . while, whereas ‘This film is very interesting, while/whereas that one is quite boring’ Result .

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makeover25 Name: Danielle School: 'Cultura Inglesa' (English Culture) I had never felt so nervous before as in {1} the day I was chosen by my teacher to explain something. The simple idea of talking in front of all my friends scared me. Connectors Connector Diagnostic: identify specific points that need review Quiz 1: beginning – intermediate Quiz 2: intermediate – advanced Overview of Coordinators, Subordinators & Prepositional Heads Linking words Linking words help you to connect ideas and sentences when you speak or write English. We can use linking words to give examples, add information, summarise, sequence information, give a reason or result, or to contrast ideas. Here's a list of the most common linking words and phrases: Giving examples For exampleFor instanceNamely The most common way to give examples is by using for example or for instance.

Linking Words — A complete List of English Connecting Words Linking & Connecting Words It is essential to understand how Linking Words, as a part of speech, can be used to combine ideas in writing - and thus ensure that ideas within sentences and paragraphs are elegantly connected - for the benefit of the reader. This will help to improve your writing (e.g. essay, comment, summary (scientific) review, (research) paper, letter, abstract, report, thesis, etc.). Cohesion: linking words and phrases 1.33 Cohesion: linking words and phrases You can use words or short phrases which help to guide your reader through your writing, and to link sentences, paragraphs and sections both forwards and backwards. Good use will make what you have written easy to follow; bad use might mean your style is disjointed, probably with too many short sentences, and consequently difficult to follow. Your mark could be affected either way. The best way to "get a feel" for these words is through your reading.

FCE Writing Guide: Writing a review Look at this task. You have been asked to write a short film review for a school /college magazine. Choose any film which you think might be of interest to your fellow students. The film can be in any language and it can be of any type: comedy, thriller, science fiction, romance, historical drama etc. Your brief is to include a clear description of the story/contents, to comment on what you think the most successful and least successful features are, and to give an overall recommendation. Write about 250 words. Tony Blair on The World at One, BBC Radio 4 audioBoom News & Current Affairs | Featured post | The World at One / The World This Weekend play English Grammar Pill: How to use “unless”? A fellow teacher asked me a few weeks ago if I had written anything about the use of the conjunction “unless”, and if I hadn’t, would I be prepared to write something about it? Not one to refuse a challenge, I thought to myself: “Why not?” Well, it took me longer than I thought to get round to researching this pesky grammar word and when I finally got down to working on it, I realised why I had delayed the process.

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