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Addition and contrast

Addition and contrast
Related:  Transition and linking wordspracticing at home

English Grammar Pill: How to use “unless”? A fellow teacher asked me a few weeks ago if I had written anything about the use of the conjunction “unless”, and if I hadn’t, would I be prepared to write something about it? Not one to refuse a challenge, I thought to myself: “Why not?” Well, it took me longer than I thought to get round to researching this pesky grammar word and when I finally got down to working on it, I realised why I had delayed the process. There are certain grammar rules and parts of speech that are used naturally and without thinking by native speakers all their lives until that moment when someone asks them how a certain word or expression is used and everything falls apart! You begin to wonder whether you have grasped your native language at all. I decided to give it a go and I sincerely hope that my explanation makes sense. STRUCTURE As mentioned above, unless is a conjunction which we use in conditional phrases. When unless comes before a main clause we use a comma: They won’t come unless you invite them.

Free Online English Lessons and Exercises Types of Conjunctions: Coordinate Conjunctions, Subordinate Conjunctions, and Correlative Conjunctions written by: Keren Perles • edited by: SForsyth • updated: 10/17/2014 What are conjunctions? Sure, they're joining words, but they're much more than that. Conjunctions are the words that decide the importance of the various other words in the sentence. Definition: Conjunctions are words that link other words, phrases or clauses.

English Worksheets CONJUNCTIONS A conjunction is a word that links words, phrases, or clauses. Conjunctions come in three broad types: coordinating conjunctions, correlative conjunctions, and subordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions join single words or groups of words, but they must always join similar elements: subject + subject, verb phrase + verb phrase, sentence + sentence, etc. Coordinating conjunctions and correlative conjunctions are listed below. To help remember the coordinating conjunctions, think of the word FANBOYS. Click on the conjunction to read a bit more about it. Commas and coordinating conjunctions: 1. Marty had thought he had a date with Sarah, but Sarah went to the movies with Jesse, instead. 2. I bought apples, oranges, and bananas. 3. She thought she loved him, but she really didn't. In most of their other roles as joiners (other than joining independent clauses, that is), coordinating conjunctions can join two sentence elements without the help of a comma. AND: Its uses and functions.

English Activities and Exercises Conjunctions, connectors, coordination and subordination Coordinating and subordinating words : conjunctions connectors and conjunctive adverbs. Key points : Connectors - also called conjunctive words - are words that link two similar elements in a sentence. The four categories of connector are A small number of conjunctions and conjunctive adverbs can link individual words or phrases; but the majority can only link two clauses.A coordinated clause or phrase must follow the clause or phrase to which it is connected.A subordinate clause normally follows the main clause, but in some cases may preceed it. See below. The problem with conjunctions : where linguists disagree Most traditional grammars just repeat the established classification of conjunctions as being either coordinating conjunctions or subordinating conjunctions. OK Though he did not win, he took part in the competition. This suggests that the pertinent distinction between different types of conjunction is not actually one of function, but one of usage. Part 1. 1. Examples: 2. 3.

English Language Centre Study Zone: Welcome! About the Study Zone The Study Zone is for students of the English Language Centre (ELC) at the University of Victoria. ELC teachers create the English language lessons and practice exercises. The site is designed for our adult English language learners, but all are welcome to read the lessons and use the exercises. News and Feedback We occasionally post news on the Study Zone blog and we're happy to receive comments on the blog's Feedback Page. Who visits Study Zone? This map shows the visitors to this page only. What do I do? First, choose your level. Study Zone is made up of levels. Where am I now? The menu at the top of each page tells you where you are. 10 Types of Transitions By Mark Nichol Writing is simply a matter of expressing ideas, but as we all know, it’s not so simple after all. One challenge is to coherently connect those ideas. These words and phrases can be used within a sentence as well as at the beginning. 1. “Besides, it would give me great satisfaction to help you.” “First, I’d like to thank you for inviting me to speak tonight.” 2. “Likewise, the sequel was very successful.” “Similarly, we observed no differences in response rate.” 3. “Naturally, the final decision is up to her.” “Of course, he will want to examine the documents himself.” 4. “However, I don’t see what that has to do with anything.” “Otherwise, how can they expect us to comply?” 5. “As a result, I’m not sure what to do.” “For this reason, we have decided to halt the project.” 6. “Certainly, he’ll find out for himself in time.” “In fact, they’re on their way right now.” 7. “In particular, I draw your attention to the stain on the carpet.” 8. “Eventually, we’ll see some improvement.” 9. 10.

11 Free Websites to Practice English at Home RTlibrary on FlickrAt the New York Public Library's Adult Learning Centers, where adults work on basic English and literacy skills, we're often asked for recommendations of websites for adults to practice English at home. Below you'll find eleven sites, some with a focus on listening, some on vocabulary, others on grammar, and some with a range of activities. Happy learning! Easy World of Englisheasyworldofenglish.com An attractive, user-friendly website including grammar, pronunciation, reading and listening practice and an interactive picture dictionary. Many Thingsmanythings.org This website includes matching quizzes, word games, word puzzles, proverbs, slang expressions, anagrams, a random-sentence generator and other computer-assisted language learning activities. Dave's ESL Cafeeslcafe.com A forum for both ESL teachers and students around the world. Activities for ESL Studentsa4esl.org Grammar and vocabulary practice for all levels, including many bilingual quizzes for beginners.

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