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Connectors

Connectors
Connector Diagnostic: identify specific points that need review Quiz 1: beginning – intermediate Quiz 2: intermediate – advanced Overview of Coordinators, Subordinators & Prepositional Heads Connector Review: overview of connective words that relate phrases and clauses Intermediate– Advanced ESL, Native Speaker The day was cold and windy. They day was cloudy, windy and also cold. It was cloudy and windy. The wind was strong as well as cold. Besides being windy, it was also cold. The day was windy and cold. It was bright, clear and windy. It was bright, clear and windy. Coordinators FANBOYS: join words, phrases and clauses with coordinators Beginning–Advanced ESL, Native Speaker She danced and waved a fan. She danced and waved a fan, and he played the flute. Coordinators—Addition And / In addition: join sentence elements and sentences Intermediate–Advanced ESL, Native Speaker Anne is an actress. Anne acts, sings and dances. You should see Anne. Hire him because he is young and smart. Coordinators—Paired

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Linkers and connectors - English Subject Area Contrast . In spite of / Despite Link two contrasting ideas. Types of Conjunctions: Coordinate Conjunctions, Subordinate Conjunctions, and Correlative Conjunctions written by: Keren Perles • edited by: SForsyth • updated: 10/17/2014 What are conjunctions? Sure, they're joining words, but they're much more than that. Linking Words — A complete List of English Connecting Words Linking & Connecting Words It is essential to understand how Linking Words, as a part of speech, can be used to combine ideas in writing - and thus ensure that ideas within sentences and paragraphs are elegantly connected - for the benefit of the reader. This will help to improve your writing (e.g. essay, comment, summary (scientific) review, (research) paper, letter, abstract, report, thesis, etc.). It is also fundamental to be aware of the sometimes subtle meaning of these "small" words within the English language.

The Earth and Beyond Welcome to The Earth and Beyond Hello, my name is Tim O'Brien. I'm an astronomer working at The University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory. As an astronomer my job is to try and understand how the universe works and my main interest is why some stars explode - more about this later! No one could see the colour blue until modern times This isn’t another story about that dress, or at least, not really. It’s about the way that humans see the world, and how until we have a way to describe something, even something so fundamental as a colour, we may not even notice that it’s there. Until relatively recently in human history, “blue” didn’t exist. As the delightful Radiolab episode “Colours” describes, ancient languages didn’t have a word for blue — not Greek, not Chinese, not Japanese, not Hebrew. And without a word for the colour, there’s evidence that they may not have seen it at all.

Tony Blair on The World at One, BBC Radio 4 audioBoom News & Current Affairs | Featured post | The World at One / The World This Weekend play Tony Blair on The World at One, BBC Radio 4 CONJUNCTIONS A conjunction is a word that links words, phrases, or clauses. Conjunctions come in three broad types: coordinating conjunctions, correlative conjunctions, and subordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions join single words or groups of words, but they must always join similar elements: subject + subject, verb phrase + verb phrase, sentence + sentence, etc. Correlative conjunctions also connect sentence elements of the same kind but with one difference: correlative conjunctions are always used in pairs. Subordinating conjunctions connect subordinate clauses to a main clause. These conjunctions are adverbs used as conjunctions.

Linking words Linking words help you to connect ideas and sentences, so that people can follow your ideas. Giving examples For exampleFor instanceNamely Educational Leadership:Technology-Rich Learning:New Literacies and the Common Core A group of high school students stares intently at the famous crop-duster sequence from Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest. Cary Grant is standing alone at the side of a deserted highway. As film buffs know, Grant isn't alone for long; a mysterious crop-duster plane soon appears out of nowhere and begins dive-bombing him, chasing him down the road until he is forced to take cover in a cornfield.

10 top writing tips and the psychology behind them There are plenty of folks happy to tell you how to write better, just as any doctor will tell you to “eat right and exercise.” But changing your writing (or eating) habits only happens when you understand why you do what you do. I can help you with that.

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