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Although, Though, Despite and However - Online Language Quiz

Although, Though, Despite and However - Online Language Quiz
Related:  Transition and linking wordsusefulTransitions

Learn about Conjuctions - And/But - TurtleDiary The word that joins words or two parts of a sentence is called a conjunction. Conjunctions are also called 'joining words' or 'connecting words'. Conjunctions only join words or two parts of a sentence, they do no other work. The words 'and', 'but' are joining words or conjunctions. They are used to join words as well as sentences. Let's understand through examples, how 'and', 'but' can be used to join words or sentences. And is a connecting word that tells you more. Example: The bird can fly. But is a connecting word that makes a contrast between two words or sentences. Example: He hit the ball. Here, 'but' is used to join the sentences with unlike ideas. Thus, the conjunctions, 'and', 'but' are used to join words or sentences that are similar in structure.

Linking words Home » English Grammar » Linking words help you to connect ideas and sentences when you speak or write English. We can use linking words to give examples, add information, summarise, sequence information, give a reason or result, or to contrast ideas. Here's a list of the most common linking words and phrases: Giving examples For exampleFor instanceNamely The most common way to give examples is by using for example or for instance. Namely refers to something by name." Adding information AndIn additionAs well asAlsoTooFurthermoreMoreoverApart fromIn addition toBesides Ideas are often linked by and. "We discussed training, education and the budget." You can use also with not only to give emphasis." We don't usually start a sentence with also. As well as can be used at the beginning or the middle of a sentence." Too goes either at the end of the sentence, or after the subject and means as well." Apart from and besides are often used to mean as well as, or in addition to." Summarising Sequencing ideas

Hot Potatoes Home Page 10 Types of Transitions By Mark Nichol Writing is simply a matter of expressing ideas, but as we all know, it’s not so simple after all. One challenge is to coherently connect those ideas. These words and phrases can be used within a sentence as well as at the beginning. 1. “Besides, it would give me great satisfaction to help you.” “First, I’d like to thank you for inviting me to speak tonight.” 2. “Likewise, the sequel was very successful.” “Similarly, we observed no differences in response rate.” 3. “Naturally, the final decision is up to her.” “Of course, he will want to examine the documents himself.” 4. “However, I don’t see what that has to do with anything.” “Otherwise, how can they expect us to comply?” 5. “As a result, I’m not sure what to do.” “For this reason, we have decided to halt the project.” 6. “Certainly, he’ll find out for himself in time.” “In fact, they’re on their way right now.” 7. “In particular, I draw your attention to the stain on the carpet.” 8. “Eventually, we’ll see some improvement.” 9. 10.

INTRODUCTION FIRST,FIRSTLY (d'abord),FIRST OF ALL (tout d'abord),IN THE FIRST PLACE (en premier lieu),ABOVE ALL,FIRST AND FOREMOST,MOST OF ALL (avant tout).AT FIRST,INITIALLY,FOR A START,AS A STARTING POINT,TO START/BEGIN WITH, IN/AT THE BEGINNING (au début, pour commencer),STARTING WITH (en commençant par),AT FIRST SIGHT/GLANCE (à première vue, au premier abord). WHAT IS IT ALL ABOUT? (de quoi s'agit-il), WHAT IS THE MAIN POINT/PROBLEM/QUESTION/IDEA/ISSUE ? IT IS A MATTER/QUESTION OF... THEN,AFTERWARDS (puis, ensuite),NEXT,AFTER THAT (après cela),SECONDLY,IN THE SECOND PLACE (en second lieu), BESIDES,IN ADDITION,MOREOVER (de plus), SIMILARLY,IN THE SAME WAY (de la même facon),ALSO,TOO, AS WELL,EQUALLY (aussi, également),NEITHER ... BUT (mais), NEVERTHELESS,HOWEVER (cependant), YET (pourtant), ON THE CONTRARY (au contraire), IN THE OTHER HAND (en revanche), CONVERSELY (à l'oppposé), ON THE ONE HAND...ON THE OTHER HAND... PURPOSE : (but)

Strategies to Ensure Introverted Students Feel Valued at School When Susan Cain wrote Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking in 2012, it was a big success. The book made the cover of Time magazine, spent weeks on the New York Times best-sellers list and was the subject of one of the most-watched TED Talks, with more than 13 million views. From that grew The Quiet Revolution, a company Cain co-founded that continues to produce and share content about, and for, introverts. The site offers an online training course for parents and stories submitted by readers about being introverted. There’s even a podcast. Kids, Cain says, “are at the heart and center of it.” “Introverts often are really amazing, talented, gifted, loving children, and they feel like there’s something wrong with them,” she says. In her latest book, Quiet Power: The Secret Strengths of Introverts, she’s taking her message about introverts to teenagers. I talked with Cain about her mission of supporting introverts, and asked her advice on how to teach them.

Online Testing Free Quiz Maker Create the Best web-based quizzes ClassMarker 40 Useful Words and Phrases for Top-Notch Essays 17.7KGoogle +202 1702 2322 25 August, 2014 The secret to a successful essay doesn’t just lie in the clever things you talk about and the way you structure your points. To be truly brilliant, an essay needs to utilise the right language. General explaining Let’s start by looking at language for general explanations of complex points. 1. Usage: “In order to” can be used to introduce an explanation for the purpose of an argument. Example: “In order to understand X, we need first to understand Y.” 2. Usage: Use “in other words” when you want to express something in a different way (more simply), to make it easier to understand, or to emphasise or expand on a point. Example: “Frogs are amphibians. 3. Usage: This phrase is another way of saying “in other words”, and can be used in particularly complex points, when you feel that an alternative way of wording a problem may help the reader achieve a better understanding of its significance. Example: “Plants rely on photosynthesis. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Types of Conjunctions: Coordinate Conjunctions, Subordinate Conjunctions, and Correlative Conjunctions written by: Keren Perles • edited by: SForsyth • updated: 10/17/2014 What are conjunctions? Sure, they're joining words, but they're much more than that. Conjunctions are the words that decide the importance of the various other words in the sentence. Definition: Conjunctions are words that link other words, phrases or clauses. Some Excellent Rubric Generators for Teachers July 3, 2016 A few days ago we published here in EdTech and mLearning a collection of some interesting web tools teachers can use to create educational rubrics. Today, we are adding this wonderful resource from Teachnology which is basically a huge selection of pre-made rubrics and rubric generators that can be integrated into different subject areas. As we have argued elsewhere, rubrics are helpful for both teachers and students: teachers can use them when designing lesson plans and grading assignments; students can use them to make sure they meet the learning expectations and requirements of an assignment or project work. Teachnology’s rubrics are arranged into 10 main categories: general, language arts, learn about them, math, pre-made collection, process, rubric maker membership, science, social studies, and all rubrics. Basic Reading Skills Rubric Generator- Handwriting Rubric Generator 'A useful rubric for evaluating overall keyboarding skills.' Notebook Rubric Maker

Kärlek, vetenskap, empati och en jäkla fin textbindning - Robin Smith (Det här inlägget handlar om en skrivövning för engelska på gymnasiet) ”Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life:” så inleder Bertrand Russell prologen till sin självbiografi från 1956. Han fortsätter genom att lista de tre passioner som styrt hans liv: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. ”Mitt namn är Russell, Bertrand Russell” I undervisningen är prologen är ett väldigt fint verktyg för att lära eleverna att strukturera en text och ge dem möjligheten att reflektera över vuxenlivet. What I Have Lived for Three passions, simple but overwhelmingly strong, have governed my life: the longing for love, the search for knowledge, and unbearable pity for the suffering of mankind. I have sought love, first, because it brings ecstasy – ecstasy so great that I would often have sacrificed all the rest of my life for a few hours of this joy. With equal passion I have sought knowledge. This has been my life.

Linking words and transitional phrases in English - how to use them Linking words and phrases in English (also called 'connective' or 'transition' words) are used to combine two clauses or sentences presenting contrast, comparison, condition, supposition, purpose, etc. They enable us to establish clear connections between ideas. Most linking words can either connect clauses within a sentence, or start a sentence to form a link with the previous statement. ♦Note : A clause is a group of words that includes a subject and a verb. The following sentence contains two clauses: She lives in Mexico because she likes the climate. Below you will find some examples of linking words and how to use them. Examples of linking words within one sentence: Examples of linking words that connect two separate sentences or two clauses: ♦Note : If linking words start a sentence, they are followed by a comma. Try these online exercises back to lesson list

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