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Sugata Mitra shows how kids teach themselves

Sugata Mitra shows how kids teach themselves

http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_shows_how_kids_teach_themselves.html

Related:  Educational Models

Riesman model of Education and Culture In April 1997 the Harvard University Gazette reported, "The journal Contemporary Sociology has named the best-selling sociology book ever... The Lonely Crowd (Yale University Press) by David Riesman, [with] Nathan Glazer, and Reuel Denney, which the journal says has sold some 1.4 million copies since it was published in 1950." Interestingly, if the web is anything to go by, it is the fact of its popularity and influence which is most remarked, rather than what it says. Why Schools Need to Get Social, Local and Mobile Troy Williams is Vice President and General Manager of Macmillan New Ventures, the global media company’s division that discovers, develops and markets innovative technologies that make learning more engaging. It’s not revelatory that the academic and the tech worlds move at vastly different paces. Education often lags behind when it comes tech adoption and integration. But there has never been a better time for innovation in the classroom. Although public school systems face drastic budget cuts and harsh public scrutiny, we continue to see the private sector (as well as government initiatives) invest in vibrant and disruptive education tech. SEE ALSO: Why Education Needs to Get Its Game On

The student authored syllabus Author: Suz Burroughs In either formal learning, informal learning or models which transition between the two, there are many opportunities for learners to co-create the syllabus and/or outline their own course of action. The sage on the stage of formal instruction must become at the most a guide on the side who acts as a coach appearing only when needed rather than as a lecturer who determines the content that the learners need to master. Why Education Needs to Get Its Game On Gerard LaFond is the VP of marketing for Pearson’s College and Career Readiness division and the co-founder of Persuasive Games. He’s currently working on the gamification of education through the Pearson start-up, Alleyoop. Kids spend hours a day on sites like Facebook and YouTube. They play highly immersive video games, watch engrossing shows on their HDTVs and interact with apps on their mobile devices. All of this is in stark contrast to how they spend their days at school, where educators lecture and write on blackboards, then ask kids to read boring textbooks and practice abstract skills or memorize obscure facts.

Journal of e-Learning and Knowledge Society The Challenge of Open Education Eleonora Pantò, Anna Comas-Quinn Abstract Digital culture and the remix culture it has generated have changed the way in which knowledge and learning are constructed.‬ The last decade since the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) launched the Open Courseware initiative (OCW) in 2002 has seen a significant increase in the number of initiatives related to Open Educational Resources (OER) and open education in general. New institutions, with different objectives and business models, are emerging rapidly outside traditional universities: start-ups that offer free Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC), consortia of universities from four continents that share teaching materials and infrastructure, and universities where classes are taught by the students themselves.‬

New Report Reimagines Learning in a Networked Society A research report released today by the Connected Learning Research Network tackles the big issues in education and fundamentally reimagines what learning looks like in the 21st century. The Connected Learning Research Network – a group of nine interdisciplinary thinkers (including our own Katie Salen) – is focused on understanding the opportunities and challenges that arise for learning in today’s changing media ecology, and developing a new model of connected learning: learning that is socially-connected, interest-driven, and geared towards educational opportunity for all. In response to these trends, the document offers a new framework to expand the reach of meaningful and sustained learning. Connected learning, the report argues, embodies the values of equity, participation, and social belonging by integrating the divergent spheres of peer culture, interests, and academic content.

Back to School : Got a new interactive whiteboard? So it’s mid-August and for many teachers the new school year has begun and for others it’s not too far away. Some of you will be starting at new schools and with that there’s a chance that you’ll be coming to terms with a new interactive whiteboard. You may already be familiar with whiteboards already, and are just starting at a school with a different brand. Company's skills tests offer glimpse of alternative credentialing The big enchilada of potential disruptions to higher education is if employers go outside of the academy to size up job seekers. While that prospect remains fanciful, for now, new approaches to skills assessment show what the future could look like. Take Smarterer, a Boston-based start-up that offers 800 free online tests for people to prove their chops in areas ranging from C++ programming to speaking English for business or understanding Gothic architecture.

Education Needs a Digital-Age Upgrade If you have a child entering grade school this fall, file away just one number with all those back-to-school forms: 65 percent. Chances are just that good that, in spite of anything you do, little Oliver or Abigail won’t end up a doctor or lawyer — or, indeed, anything else you’ve ever heard of. According to Cathy N. Davidson, co-director of the annual MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competitions, fully 65 percent of today’s grade-school kids may end up doing work that hasn’t been invented yet. The contemporary American classroom, with its grades and deference to the clock, is an inheritance from the late 19th century. So Abigail won’t be doing genetic counseling.

10 talks from inspiring teachers Professor John Keating of “The Dead Poets Society.” Calculus teacher Jaime Escalante of “Stand and Deliver.” Marine-turned-teacher Louanne Johnson of “Dangerous Minds.” P2PU How we test ideas about learning. Current projects Use the drop down list above to see all current projects. Why Anti-Authoritarians are Diagnosed as Mentally Ill (Note: Read Bruce Levine’s latest post: Anti-Authoritarians and Schizophrenia: Do Rebels Who Defy Treatment Do Better? In my career as a psychologist, I have talked with hundreds of people previously diagnosed by other professionals with oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, anxiety disorder and other psychiatric illnesses, and I am struck by (1) how many of those diagnosed are essentially anti-authoritarians, and (2) how those professionals who have diagnosed them are not. Anti-authoritarians question whether an authority is a legitimate one before taking that authority seriously. Evaluating the legitimacy of authorities includes assessing whether or not authorities actually know what they are talking about, are honest, and care about those people who are respecting their authority.

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