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Creative Commons Infographic: Licenses Explained

Creative Commons Infographic: Licenses Explained
Do you use images or photos? Do you check with the owner before saving or copying or using? Are you using Creative Commons (CC) images and think that it’s all OK because the image labelled as CC therefore you’ve done all your supposed to? Do you in fact understand what Creative Commons is? Right, so you understand CC now? Click to view full Infographic A photo or image placed under a Creative Commons license enables you, the ‘borrower’ to copy, distribute, and display the work providing the photo or image is correctly attributed to the owner. According to the infographic: more than 90% of CC photos are not attributed, and more than 99% of CC photos that are attributed are not attributed properly. That kind of makes me want to go back over my old posts to see if I’ve correctly attributed the CC images I’ve used in the past. Be safe with how you use CC materials – if in doubt, check! Posted in eLearning . By David Hopkins – January 3, 2013 Related:  Interesting apps for educationCopyright, Fair Share, Creative Commons

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: A list of All The Best iPad Apps Teachers Need Coming to you from the Canadian Maritimes ( Halifax), Educational Technology and Mobile Learning is an educational blog dedicated to curating, reviewing and sharing EdTech tools and mobile apps. The purpose is to help teachers and educators effectively integrate digital technologies into their day-to-day teaching, learning and professional development. For any questions regarding our website or the content we publish, please contact EdTech admin, editor and blog owner, Med Kharbach at: info@educatorstechnology.com. Med Kharbach is a doctoral researcher and a former teacher with 10 years of classroom teaching experience. Med's research interests include: language learning, linguistics, Internet linguistics, critical linguistics, discourse analysis, new (emerging) literacies, and educational technology. Here is how to cite any of our blog posts in APA style : Kharbach, M. Example: Kharbach, M. (2016, December 30). 9 Fundamental digital skills for 21st century teachers [Blog post].

A Printable Guide To Creative Commons Something you probably see a lot of these days as you browse the internet is Creative Commons licensing. You’ll see many graphics that say something like ‘shared under a Creative Commons license’, or you’ll see a little rectangular graphic with some signs in them. Since we live in an age where most of our information comes from the internet in some way or another, its useful to know when and how it is ok to use something that you’ve found. We’ve already taken a look at some fair use guidelines (which comes along with a brief mention of Creative Commons licensing), but we thought that this handy infographic below gave a great, easy to read and understand version of the different types of CC licenses available. Keep reading to learn more. These licenses allow you to easily give others the opportunity to share your work.

Copyright Infringement: 5 Myths vs Facts | Legal123.com.au Internet Copyright Infringement is not well understood – there are lots of myths and misunderstandings circulating online. So to help website owners, we designed this simple Infographic to explain how to avoid breaching Copyright and how to protect yourself using a Copyright Infringement Notice. Use this Infographic on your website Download a PDF version of this Infographic here or copy and paste the code below into the html of your website: <b>++ Click Image to Enlarge ++</b><br /><a href=" ><img src=" alt="Internet Copyright Infringement"></a><br />Source: Copyright Infringement: Myths vs Facts from <a href=" >Legal123.com.au</a> Video transcript … Copyright Infringement Notice »

How to Cite and Credit Images February 26, 2014 With the massive uptake of web 2.0 technologies knowledge becomes much more democratized and anyone with internet connection can virtually access, read, re-use, and share online content at a spectacular speed. And while this technological boom has destroyed the shackles and geographical barriers that used to stand in the way of a fully literate society, copyright issues have been on the raise particularly with this growing mindset among millennials that anything findable online is free to use. Our job as teachers is to draw our students attention to the fact that copy-paste culture is destructive and that appropriate citations and crediting back the sources, if ever we are allowed to, are two important things we always need to invoke as we are dealing with both digital and non digital content. I have an entire section in this blog packed full of resources, tools and tips on how to teach your students about copyright, check it out here to learn more.

How To Find Open Education Resources 10 Ways To Become A Better Online Learner 5.81K Views 0 Likes There are some quick and easy ways to become a better online learner. Whether you're taking a class or just researching, here are the DOs and DON'Ts. Free Pictures - FreeFoto.com Creative Commons Licenses Explained In Plain English Welcome to my blog! If you would like to keep updated on new posts, please consider subscribing via RSS feed or subscribe through email by using the box in the sidebar. In addition, consider following me on Twitter, Google+, or Facebook. Thanks for visiting SaraFHawkins.com! One of the best ways to find usable copyrighted works, especially images, is to find someone who wants to share their work under a Creative Commons license. Unfortunately, most people don’t know what all these little icons mean and how the licenses work. Many people who find works that are covered by one of the following license want to do right and not upset the original creator of the work. Key things to know: Every Creative Commons license requires giving appropriate credit. Note: These specifically reference Creative Commons 4.0, but the explanations also apply to prior versions. In reality, though, what I usually see is a “photo courtesy of” remark with a name. We’ve got a number of things going on here.

10 Great, Free Apps for Students for Notetaking and Class Planning These days, there are some great apps for students to use to take notes for class, or to use as class planners. 1. Evernote and EverStudent My favorite is Evernote. 2. Skitch also works with Evernote and allows you to create sketches and annotate, edit and save photos and your sketches. 3. MySchoolNotebook is another note taking app I just reviewed earlier here: 4. Memonic is similar to other note taking tools in that you can clip web content, take text notes, share notes, and access it from any computer. There is also a feature coming that will allow you to use Memonic's web clipper to save notes directly to your Evernote account. 5. SimpleNote is exactly what it's name says - it's a free, simple note taking app. 6. Springpad is a notes and organizing service that allows you to create and organize tasks in a different way than Evernote, and organizes your notes differently. 7. 8. 9a. 9b. 10.

Commons Fair Use U.S. Copyright Office Fair Use Index Welcome to the U.S. The Fair Use Index tracks a variety of judicial decisions to help both lawyers and non-lawyers better understand the types of uses courts have previously determined to be fair—or not fair. The Fair Use Index is designed to be user-friendly. Although the Fair Use Index should prove helpful in understanding what courts have to date considered to be fair or not fair, it is not a substitute for legal advice. We hope you find the Fair Use Index a helpful resource. Please note that the Copyright Office is unable to provide specific legal advice to individual members of the public about questions of fair use.

The 20+ Apps To Know About In 2013 Education got a lot more mobile in 2012 as in-school iPad initiatives , the iPhone 5 launch and online learning providers in general made classroom experiences more interesting—and don’t expect to see teaching head back to desktop PC’s in 2013. In fact, as MOOCs and hybrid programs continue to evolve, mobile should have an ever more significant role to play. Looking back at some of 2012′s most significant app launches and updates, Education Dive assembled a list of a few of the best apps on iOS and Android devices that we think educators should know about for 2013. 1. Spin is bringing interactive learning into the 21st century—the TogetherLearn mobile app allows online learners to virtually recreate traditional classroom elements. 2. The coming year will have far-reaching implications for massive open online courses (MOOCs) and, consequently, the future of education. 3. Desire2Learn’s suite of options for its campus apps is always evolving. 4. 5. 6. Tired of saving receipts? 7. 8. 9.

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