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6 Strategies for Differentiated Instruction in Project-Based Learning

6 Strategies for Differentiated Instruction in Project-Based Learning
Project-based learning (PBL) naturally lends itself to differentiated instruction. By design, it is student-centered, student-driven, and gives space for teachers to meet the needs of students in a variety of ways. PBL can allow for effective differentiation in assessment as well as daily management and instruction. PBL experts will tell you this, but I often hear teachers ask for real examples, specifics to help them contextualize what it "looks like" in the classroom. We all need to try out specific ideas and strategies to get our brains working in a different context. Here are some specific differentiation strategies to use during a PBL project. 1. We all know that heterogeneous grouping works, but sometimes homogenous grouping can be an effective way to differentiate in a project. 2. Reflection is an essential component of PBL. 3. This is probably one of my favorites. 4. 5. Formative assessments can look the same for all students. 6.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/differentiated-instruction-strategies-pbl-andrew-miller

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Project-Based Learning Idea: Students Create Their Own Viral Video I am continuously inspired by the increasing number of shared video content which let’s face it, in this digital age, we can’t really avoid. The sharing and re-sharing of videos via email and through Facebook and Twitter have undoubtedly given rise to the phenomenon of these ‘viral’ videos. It goes without saying that shared video content is more popular than ever before, with more than 48 hours worth of video being uploaded to YouTube every single minute. Given that YouTube is the most popular video sharing website on the web, and only six years old, there is huge potential for virtually any video content to go viral. What Is A Viral Video? A viral video is quite simply a video that becomes popular through internet sharing.

Six Steps for Planning a Successful Project Sure, King Middle School has some amazing projects, but the Portland school has been refining its expeditionary learning projects for nearly two decades. David Grant, who guides the school's technology integration and curriculum development, has put together a six-step rubric for designing a project. He says Fading Footprints, which became a model for King and Expeditionary Learning Schools, doesn't take an entire school, or even a team of twelve, to plan and carry out; one or two teachers can tailor this one to fit their time and resources. Six Steps to Planning a Project The Fading Footsteps project is a twelve-week interdisciplinary ecology unit centered around the guiding question: How does diversity strengthen an ecosystem?

Are Teachers of Tomorrow Prepared to Use Innovative Tech? Getty Images With a new generation of teachers coming into the work force, there’s a discrepancy between what principals expect of teachers-in-training and what they’re actually learning in school. A new Project Tomorrow report surveying principals concluded that they want to hire new teachers with creative ideas about how technology can be leveraged to create authentic and differentiated learning experiences. But student-teachers report that their tech training focuses only on simple management tools. At the same time, the report concludes that those who have the biggest influence on new teachers — veteran educators — don’t always embrace new ways of using technology to engage students.

How to create a magical miniature garden that will add a touch of coziness to any home A terrarium is a miniature garden grown inside a covered glass or plastic container. It is extremely easy to take care of and is an ideal choice for homeowners who have little time for gardening. Moreover, a terrarium is a fun way to make your home seem more cozy and modern. While creating a miniature garden at home may seem a tricky task, with a little bit of creativity and patience you will be able to make an absolutely wonderful terrarium in no time at all. We at Bright Side will tell you how to create and maintain your own green masterpiece.

A New Infographic on Project-based Learning for Teachers July 12, 2016 According to BIE, project based learning is “an instructional approach built upon authentic learning activities that engage student interest and motivation. These activities are designed to answer a question or solve a problem and generally reflect the types of learning and work people do in the everyday world outside the classroom.”In its essence , project based learning is all about engaging learners in meaningful and goal-oriented learning activities.Technology is proved to be an effective means of creating and enhancing a PBL-based culture in and outside class. Today we are sharing with you this handy infographic we created based on a previous post we published here a few months ago.

How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from Thinking Through Project-Based Learning: Guiding Deeper Inquiry by Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss. It was published this month by Corwin. Take a moment and imagine a creative work environment. Don't worry about the kind of work going on. Just focus on the space. Using Google Classroom to Support PBL Project Based Learning has been a revelation for me. It is the first instructional “plate” I have encountered that simultaneously blends significant content and 21st century skills, and meets my teaching philosophy. I have come to believe however, that utilizing the PBL “plate” with my sixth graders is akin to going through a buffet line at your favorite restaurant. Without a predetermined method of organization, your food (or instructional) choices run together into a cluttered mess impossible to separate. I knew I needed to find a way to organize my project into a singular entity that did not cause my appetizer (entry event), main course (significant content) and dessert (final presentations) to become confusing and inaccessible for kids.

15+ Readiness Resources for Driving Student Success Learning how to drive is an exhilarating experience, unless you're the parent sitting in the passenger seat. My son passed driver's ed, and he needs to clock hours driving with a parent -- that would be me. I plan those driving experiences based on his readiness, such as empty parking lots, neighborhood streets, light and heavy traffic, highway, and night driving. (The latter two may be more an issue of my comfort level.) With each planned experience, his confidence grows toward passing his driving exam.

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