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John Hattie: Visible Learning Pt1. Disasters and below average methods.

John Hattie: Visible Learning Pt1. Disasters and below average methods.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sng4p3Vsu7Y

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Explicit Teaching: A Lesson Structure That Delivers Results How should you organise your lessons? What lesson structure should you adopt? Your answer to these questions will have a profound effect on how successful your lessons will be. Making learning Visible (John Hattie) Auckland University Professor John Hattie has recently authored a study, based on research into 83 million students, studying effective teachers around the world and has come up with some reassuring results for creative teachers. It's all about trusting relationships and 'oodles of feedback'. Note - it is not about national testing, our government's highly unoriginal plan. Click here for latest blogA link For more undated thinking about Hattie It seems hard to avoid the brief press releases of Auckland University Professor John Hattie's research in our newspapers. It is a shame that the papers haven't done more in depth research of their own into Hattie's findings.

Rethinking Whole Class Discussion Whole class discussions are, after lecture, the second most frequently used teaching strategy, one mandated by the Common Core State Standards because of its many rewards: increased perspective-taking, understanding, empathy, and higher-order thinking, among others. These benefits, however, do not manifest without a skillful and knowledgeable facilitator. Unfortunately, a preponderance of evidence demonstrates that many teachers mistakenly conflate discussion with recitation.

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. Um, I don't think she thought it was so cute. I think she was treading lightly on the ever-so shaky ego of a brand-new teacher while still giving me some very necessary feedback. So that day, I learned about wait/think time. A Blog for Principals and Teachers - School Matters Confessions of a Former SAT Hater Ask a progressive educator about standardized tests, and more often than not you will receive a negative response. Ask more specifically about the SATs, and you... The SAT Controversy The news that the SAT’s will be modified to more appropriately accord with today’s high school academic experience has been met with both strong approval...

Teacher credibility: why it matters and how to build it DEAD POETS SOCIETY, Robin Williams, 1989 When your students view you as a credible teacher, they are more likely to do well in school. According to John Hattie’s latest results (2016), teacher credibility has a massive impact (d = 0.9) on the subsequent learning that happens in the classroom. To put this in perspective, teacher credibility has more than twice the impact of student motivation. Making Thinking Visible – Headlines Routine Project Zero, an educational research group at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, has been working to enhance student learning, thinking and creativity since the 1960s. Founded by the philosopher Nelson Goodman it’s impacted global education and been guided by such education luminaries as Howard Gardner and David Perkins. Utilizing it’s core concepts and adding a dash of Socrative will bolster student reflection, critical thinking, and creativity while developing independent learners for the 21st century. Let’s Dig In!

Time Management: Planning for the Adventure Image credit: iStockphoto As we leave summer and approach back to school in a frenzy, the "To Do" list can become overwhelming. As teachers, we find ourselves pulled in different directions -- setting up our classrooms, learning student profiles, meeting with parents, lesson planning, collaborating with administrators -- the list seems eternal! There is one important element that we sometimes forget: focus. In the words of Dave Burgess from Teach Like a Pirate , my favorite summer read, "Time is our most precious commodity, and it is definitely a finite resource."

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