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Peer Learning Handbook

Peer Learning Handbook
Welcome to the Peeragogy Handbook! Peeragogy is a collection of techniques for collaborative learning and collaborative work. By learning how to “work smart” together, we hope to leave the world in a better state than it was when we arrived. Indeed, humans have always learned from each other. But for a long time — until the advent of the Web and widespread access to digital media — schools have had an effective monopoly on the business of learning. Now, with access to open educational resources and free or inexpensive communication platforms, groups of people can learn together outside as well as inside formal institutions.

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Rhizomatic Education : Community as Curriculum Below is my paper as it appears in Innovate – Journal of Online Education. Many, many thanks to the fine folks there for all their help. Note: this journal has since gone ‘out of print’. the originals are still available at archive.org but i have adjusted the links here so that they continue to work. Survival Tips for Teaching with Technology “Technology is just a tool. In terms of getting the kids working together and motivating them, the teacher is the most important.” ~ Bill Gates I have been integrating technology with students since 1997. I remember some of the first technologies I used with students were a TV/VCR, cassette recorders, cameras, polaroids, large video cameras, large desktop computers, microscopes, telescopes, the Internet, a transparency projector, and a video projector.

The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model by Terry Heick As a follow-up to our 9 Characteristics of 21st Century Learning we developed in 2009, we have developed an updated framework, The Inside-Out Learning Model. The goal of the model is simple enough–not pure academic proficiency, but instead authentic self-knowledge, diverse local and global interdependence, adaptive critical thinking, and adaptive media literacy. By design this model emphasizes the role of play, diverse digital and physical media, and a designed interdependence between communities and schools. The attempted personalization of learning occurs through new actuators and new notions of local and global citizenship.

Google Launches Open Course Builder Google launched an open source course building web application for the growing list of K-12 and big-name universities developing online classes. The barebones website is a lightweight way to bring course material online, track student engagement (with web traffic and surveys), and evaluate performance. “We want to use this launch to show that Google believes it can contribute to technology in education,” says Google’s Director of Research, Peter Norvig.

Immigration to the US - , 1789-1930 Immigration to the United States, 1789-1930, is a web-based collection of historical materials from Harvard's libraries, archives, and museums that documents voluntary immigration to the United States from the signing of the Constitution to the onset of the Great Depression. Concentrating heavily on the 19th century, Immigration to the US includes over 400,000 pages from more than 2,200 books, pamphlets, and serials, over 9,600 pages from manuscript and archival collections, and more than 7,800 photographs. By incorporating diaries, biographies, and other writings capturing diverse experiences, the collected material provides a window into the lives of ordinary immigrants. In addition to thousands of items that are now accessible to any Internet user, the collection includes contextual information on voluntary immigration and quantitative data. The site offers additional links to related digital resources on immigration to the US, including vital materials on the African diaspora.

Rhizomatic Learning – Why we teach? It’s my week at #change11. My topic? Rhizomatic Learning. Goal 23 – 10 ways I Utilize a Computer with No Internet Connection in the Classroom Goal 23 of the 30 Goals Challenge is to integrate Technology Effectively. Here’ s what I do with our classroom computer, which has no Internet connection (we got this up-to-date computer less than a year ago): 1) Showcase students’ slideshows. Every year we would reserve the computer room and see the slideshows pupils made for their literature project.

Teach Systems Thinking Hide Caption Researchers from NASA Goddard’s Global Modeling and Assimilation Office ran a simulation of the atmosphere that captured how winds whip aerosols around the world. Such simulations allow scientists to better understand how these tiny particulates travel in the atmosphere and influence weather and climate. This visualization shows how dust and sea salt swirl inside cyclones, carbon bursts from fires, sulfate streams from volcanoes.

Open Course: Social Media & Open Education I will be facilitating an open graduate course this Fall titled EC&I 831: Social Media & Open Education. This will be the 5th time I have taught the course (first time was 2007), and it’s different each time. It looks like I will have about 25 graduate students taking this for credit (which is well over the usual limit), and I’m also inviting anyone out there interested in the experience to participate for free. If you would like to learn more about the course, go to If you’re familiar with the course (from past iterations), you’ll notice that I’ve abandoned the old wiki and moved over to a WordPress site as the ‘central’ space. If you are interested in participating, see the page for non-credit participants. 40 Maps That Explain The Middle East Maps can be a powerful tool for understanding the world, particularly the Middle East, a place in many ways shaped by changing political borders and demographics. Here are 40 maps crucial for understanding the Middle East — its history, its present, and some of the most important stories in the region today. Middle East History

etmooc: Rhizomatic learning in philosophy courses I recently watched Dave Cormier‘s “Intro to rhizomatic learning” presentation as part of my participation in etmooc. Here, I’ll explain what rhizomatic learning is as briefly as I can, discuss what it might look like in a university level philosophy course, and ask a few questions. In the next post I explore a possible critique that I’ve been mulling over. I’m not just assuming here that rhizomatic learning is a good thing (though obviously I find it interesting enough to write about), but rather just at this point examining the idea to help me better work to evaluate it. What is “rhizomatic learning”? Learning to Go: Lesson Ideas for Teaching with Mobile Devices, Cell Phones, and BYOT Every day, people around the world communicate, connect, and learn digitally on the go. Our students spend hours with their devices and digital tools. Imagine if some of that time was spent learning your content. Imagine your students learning by creating, playing, translating, editing, curating, researching, and brainstorming digitally on cell phones, mobile devices, laptops, tablets, iPads, Chromebooks, and consoles.

Critical Thinking How do we think? What processes do we use to solve problems? Can these processes be learned? Although many aspects of human cognition are still a mystery, psychologists have begun to flesh out critical thinking, or the strategies we use to think in organized ways to analyze and solve problems.

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