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DESIGN SQUAD NATION . Home

DESIGN SQUAD NATION . Home
Come play again later! Come play again tomorrow!

http://pbskids.org/designsquad/

Related:  STEM Lesson IdeasGT LEADEngineering Design ChallengesSTEMSTEM Resources

ME Program Schools > Living Toolbox fast house sale scotland | RagRetail | watch game of thrones online free GCISD Aspire Academy The Grapevine-Colleyville ASPIRE Academy serves highly gifted students in grades 1-5 and is designed to meet the academic and affective needs of exceptional students within the GCISD gifted population. In order to be eligible for the Academy, students must be identified as a GT student and have a qualifying aptitude score of 140 or above in any one area. Additional assessments may be administered at the local campus level as necessary. Spaghetti & Marshmallow Exercise Goal: To encourage students to work together to practice several design thinking mindsets: Radical Collaboration, Bias to Action, Build to Think, Failing Fast, Test and Iterate. Design Thinking Modes: Prototype, Test Difficulty: BeginnerDuration: 45 minutesGroup Size: Groups of 3-4, up to 40 participants WHAT is it?

Candy Corn Catapults! (Four ways to build a catapult out of items from around the house!) This week, several excellent bloggers have teamed up to provide a play series of ideas for what to do with ALL of the candy that will be entering our homes this month! Here is our contribution to the series – candy corn catapults! We’re going to show you four different catapult versions that can all be built with items from around this house. However, it would also be fun to just provide the materials and let your kids experiment with building the best catapult. Building and testing catapults to see which shoot candy corn the farthest would make a fun fall playdate! Some friends of ours helped us come up with good catapult designs, and all of the boys (8 boys total!)

9 Maker Projects for Beginner Maker Ed Teachers Maker education (often referred to as “Maker Ed”) is a new school of educational thought that focuses on delivering constructivist, project-based learning curriculum and instructional units to students. Maker education spaces can be as large as full high school workshops with high-tech tools, or as small and low-tech as one corner of an elementary classroom. A makerspace isn't just about the tools and equipment, but the sort of learning experience the space provides to students who are making projects. Maker Ed places a premium on the balance between exploration and execution. Small projects lend themselves to indefinite tinkering and fiddling, while larger projects need complex, coordinated planning. Often, small projects can organically grow into larger and larger projects.

STEAM tips and resources you can use right now By Laura Devaney, Managing Editor, @eSN_Laura Read more by Laura Devaney March 3rd, 2014 STEAM advocates and supporters can share these tips with curriculum directors and teachers The need for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and proficiency is nothing new. But a movement is growing for STEAM education, in which the “a” stands for Arts. Cultivating scientific and mathematical viewpoints and experiences through arts education is a critical need in today’s schools, STEAM advocates say. Each of these tips, resources, or tools will help you as you attempt to integrate arts education and arts experiences into STEM education.

100 Awesome Engineering Projects for Kids By Kristie Lewis Engineering and fun aren't always two things that kids naturally associate with one another, but there are hundreds of ways to make engineering, physics and design fun and challenging for kids. Here are 100 great experiments that will let kids construct, play, learn and grow, all while they study the fundamentals of engineering. Basics These projects focus on the basics of motion, force and other essentials of physics. Balls and Ramp.

DESIGN SQUAD . Resources Skip Navigation PBSKids Go! Design Squad Parents, Educators & Engineers RESOURCES: Green Create an Engineering Mystery Bag Challenge for Kids This is a sponsored post for the littleBIGidea competition. If you are a fan of the hit TV reality competition, Masterchef, then you would be familiar with the concept of the mystery box challenge – it’s actually my favourite part of the show! For those who don’t know, the contestants are each presented with a box of identical, mystery ingredients from which they are required to create a mouthwatering dish. They don’t have to use every ingredient in the box but apart from a few, very basic pantry staples, what they discover in the box is pretty much it. It’s fun to see the dishes created by the talented and very creative contestants.

Improving Schools Through Design Thinking Design thinking is a human-centered approach to problem solving that begins with developing empathy for those facing a particular challenge. It serves as a framework that helps to define problems, empathize with others, develop prototypes of possible solutions, and hone those prototypes through multiple iterations until they have generated a viable solution to the challenge at hand. Design thinking encourages a bias toward action and, because of its reliance on rapid prototyping, frees practitioners to embrace the notion of failing forward because it's OK to make mistakes -- that's where breakthrough ideas are born. While a growing number of schools around the world are using design thinking in classrooms and empowering students to solve authentic challenges as part of an inquiry-based curriculum, this powerful process can also be used to improve the overall school experience.

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