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Gabe Zichermann: How games make kids smarter

Gabe Zichermann: How games make kids smarter

http://www.ted.com/talks/gabe_zichermann_how_games_make_kids_smarter.html

Guest Post: Auditing Astronomy Class I’m not sure exactly where this story begins, but maybe it’s here: Sometime this summer, my mom decided to take an astronomy class. She had taken drama and philosophy classes through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UC Berkeley and audited a history of theater course. She’d heard that this particular astronomy class was aimed at non-science majors, and that the professor, Alex Filippenko, had won all sorts of teaching awards. She emailed him to see if it was okay for her to sit in – it was – and then convinced a few friends to join her. Maybe what I should say next is that my mom has never been that interested in science.

Sebastian Deterding – Closing keynote: Don’t play games with me with me Web Directions @media 2011, London, May 27th 1:40pm. Presentation slides Session description In 1960, Milton Bradley published “The Game of Life”: a capitalist wet dream of a board game, won by the lucky one who retired richest. How to run a successful research lab without having a lab At the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Atul Butte gave a talk entitled, "Translational Medical Discoveries Through Data Transparency and Reuse." It could just as easily been called "how to run a successful research lab without having a lab." Butte, who is faculty at Stanford, was part of a panel that discussed the open sharing of data, and he used his own experience to provide a compelling case study that showed that, when researchers share their data, it enables others to drive a field forward in new ways. Butte focused on a specific type of data, generated by what are called DNA or gene chips.

Gamification: the Future of Employee Training? « Marie Wiere's Blue Sky Management Blog June 3, 2012 by Marie Wiere A screen shot of the True Office application In recent months I have read several articles in he business press of forward-thinking companies who are incorporating the gamification trend in to their training programs. Gamification in this context can transform a training program in to a story telling video game experience with progress-based scoring and rewards. Newsmaker: James Gee on Why the Power of Games to Teach Remains Unrealized Gee: “We need to begin to get teams of people — game designers, content people, assessment people, learning people — who can get on the same page.” For more than a decade, James Paul Gee has been writing about the potential power of games and game mechanics to change the way we learn, to create new “deep” learners. But in this newsmaker interview Gee says most of the possibilities of games remain unfulfilled as the American education system continues to focus on tests and fact retention. He worries that even as learning games become more prevalent, they are in danger of being changed by the schools they seek to sell to rather than changing the school itself.

40 Photo-Illustrated Questions to Refocus Your Mind Asking the right questions is the answer… It’s not the answers you get from others that will help you, but the questions you ask of yourself. Here are 40 thought-provoking questions to help you refresh and refocus your thinking: Please share your thoughts with us in the comments section below. “This Game Sucks”: How to Improve the Gamification of Education (EDUCAUSE Review Sarah "Intellagirl" Smith-Robbins (sabsmith@indiana.edu) is Director of Emerging Technologies and a faculty member at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University. With this issue of EDUCAUSE Review, she begins a one-year term as Editor of the New Horizons department. Comments on this article can be posted to the web via the link at the bottom of this page. "Focusing on the ways that entertainment technology engages us can result in methods that we can transfer to any learning situation." Gamification.

Social And Emotional Benefits Of Video Games: Metacognition and Relationships Brad Flickinger Part 4 of MindShift’s Guide to Games and Learning. For years, most people thought that video games were like candy: mostly bad, tempting to children, but okay in moderation.

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