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What Makes a Leader?

What Makes a Leader?
It was Daniel Goleman who first brought the term “emotional intelligence” to a wide audience with his 1995 book of that name, and it was Goleman who first applied the concept to business with his 1998 HBR article, reprinted here. In his research at nearly 200 large, global companies, Goleman found that while the qualities traditionally associated with leadership—such as intelligence, toughness, determination, and vision—are required for success, they are insufficient. Truly effective leaders are also distinguished by a high degree of emotional intelligence, which includes self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill. These qualities may sound “soft” and unbusinesslike, but Goleman found direct ties between emotional intelligence and measurable business results. Every businessperson knows a story about a highly intelligent, highly skilled executive who was promoted into a leadership position only to fail at the job. Evaluating Emotional Intelligence

http://hbr.org/2004/01/what-makes-a-leader/ar/1

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The Emotion Which Drives People To Work The Hardest People prone to this emotion work the hardest. People prone to feeling guilty are amongst the hardest workers, a new study finds. Not only that but people prone to feeling guilty are also highly ethical and are less likely to take advantage of other people’s skills to get paid more. The results come from research published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, in which psychologists carried out 5 studies to test the effects of feeling guilty on work performance (Wiltermuth & Cohen, 2014). Dr. Try This One Phrase to Make Feedback 40% More Effective Employees deserve feedback. So we give it--sometimes with great results, sometimes not so much. But there's one phrase you can use that will instantly improve the impact of the feedback you give--whether the actual feedback is positive or negative. The following comes from Daniel Coyle, author of The Talent Code (one of the few books I actually give to friends) and The Little Book of Talent (a book I've written about before) and a blog about performance improvement that belongs on your must-read list.

The 5 Ways to Spot an Emotionally Intelligent Leader Research has shown us that more than 90 percent of top leadership performers have a high amount of emotional intelligence, or EI. The higher up the ladder that leaders are, the more people they impact and their EI becomes increasingly important. The person at the top sets the atmosphere that permeates the organization, including the emotional temperature. Not only does a leader with low emotional intelligence have a negative impact on employee morale, it directly impacts staff retention. We know that the biggest reason that people give for leaving an organization is the relationship with those above them. Here are five ways to spot an emotionally intelligent leader:

Six Emotional Leadership Styles - Leadership Training From MindTools Choosing the Right Style for the Situation Find out how emotional leadership styles can affect your team's happiness. © iStockphoto/Kuklev Notes From The Classroom: Tell Your Own Story Before Others Tell It For You - Ariel Group Notes From The Classroom: Tell Your Own Story Before Others Tell It For You By: Kate Nugent Kate Nugent is a director, consultant, and coach. She has conducted leadership development programs for organizations such as American Express, General Electric, Deloitte Consulting, and Merrill Lynch. She has taught acting... Creative Thinking: 18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently Businessman thinking about a new creative idea Creativity works in mysterious and often paradoxical ways. Creative thinking is a stable, defining characteristic in some personalities, but it may alsochange based on situation and context. Inspiration and ideas often arise seemingly out of nowhere and then fail to show up when we most need them, and creative thinking requires complex cognition yet is completely distinct from the thinking process. Neuroscience paints a complicated picture of creativity.

When Power Goes To Your Head, It May Shut Out Your Heart Neuroscientists have found evidence to suggest feeling powerful dampens a part of our brain that helps with empathy. Vladgrin/istockphoto.com hide caption toggle caption Vladgrin/istockphoto.com Neuroscientists have found evidence to suggest feeling powerful dampens a part of our brain that helps with empathy. Storytelling: A Story of Self, a Story of Us, and a Story of Now - Ariel Group Storytelling: A Story of Self, a Story of Us, and a Story of Now By: Richard Richards Richard Richards has traveled wide and far in a number of leadership and training roles in both corporate and non-profit arenas.

Maintaining a Strong Player Mindset - compLexity Gaming by Jordan “TheJordude” Hong Tai Hey everyone, TheJordude from compLexity Gaming here. In this article, I wanted to touch the topic of a player’s mind set when queuing into games, and how significant this is to their performance and overall deciding the outcome of the game. As I specialize in Hearthstone, I will be referring most of my points to this game, however you may see this topic applicable to anything in life so I will try to broaden my words accordingly. This also does not only refer to new or amateur players, even pro players relate, or even relate more to this topic than the average person.

What Makes a Leader? Every businessperson knows a story about a highly intelligent, highly skilled executive who was promoted into a leadership position only to fail at the job. And they also know a story about someone with solid—but not extraordinary—intellectual abilities and technical skills who was promoted into a similar position and then soared. Such anecdotes support the widespread belief that identifying individuals with the “right stuff” to be leaders is more art than science. After all, the personal styles of superb leaders vary: Some leaders are subdued and analytical; others shout their manifestos from the mountaintops. And just as important, different situations call for different types of leadership. Most mergers need a sensitive negotiator at the helm, whereas many turnarounds require a more forceful authority.

The Plus Side of Pissing People Off Tim Ferriss, author of The 4-Hour Work Week Right alongside the cash and credit cards, I keep a number of strange things in my wallet. The largest is a folded-up page from the July 6, 2009, issue of Fortune magazine. In a profile, Scott Boras, widely regarded as the most powerful agent in professional baseball, describes a dinner with one of his mentors after a record-breaking contract: “He said that if you are really effective at what you do, 95% of the things said about you will be negative. Keep your head on straight, don’t get emotional, take the heat, and just make sure your clients are smiling.” Time to Develop One Hour of Training Designing training is as much of an art as it is a science. However, that doesn’t mean we should abandon the act of trying to figure out how long it takes to develop an hour of training. Scientific measures and standards can be applied at least as rough guidelines. With some type of standard, it becomes possible to gain a general idea of how much time a training project might take. While many may argue about using “one hour of training” as a measuring stick because of the difficulty of determining exactly what one hour means, it is a common term and has some traction with managers trying to plan resources.

It pays to have an eye for emotions Attending to and caring about the emotions of employees and colleagues -- that's for wimps, not for tough businesspeople and efficient performers, right? Wrong! An extensive international study has now shown: The "ability to recognize emotions" affects income. The corresponding author of the study is Professor Dr. Gerhard Blickle of the Department of Psychology at the University of Bonn. The results are published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior. The CEO Of The Future Is A "Designer-In-Chief" A century ago, the CEO was a fearsome whip-cracker. Fifty years ago, he was motivator dangling corporate incentives. And now, according to the 2015 Wolff Olins Leadership Report, the CEO has evolved into something new: The designer-in-chief of corporate culture, a mentoring figurehead who gets into the trenches with his employees and inspires them to create the next great innovation.

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