background preloader

Mobile Computing with iPhone and Android

Mobile Computing with iPhone and Android
The dates for each paper presentation are listed below. For each paper, a student or group of students will be asked to present the paper. The presentation should present a technical overview of the paper and argue the merits and flaws of the paper. Each paper presentation should be 25-30 minutes, plus time for questions. There will be 2 paper presentations per class. All students are required to read the papers before they are presented. Presentations will be graded based on apparent understanding of the material in the paper, presentation style, and entertainment value. In creating your presentations, you are free to use any additional material beyond the content of the paper. The class will be held in an AcIS Electronic Classroom and we strongly encourage you to use the presentation equipment available there. January 22 - First day of class Roy Levin and David D.

Related:  general knowledge

Great Works in Programming Languages In September, 2004, I posted a query to the Types list asking people to name the five most important papers ever written in the area of programming languages. This page collects the responses I received. (A few are missing because I am still tracking down bibliographic information.) Many thanks to Frank Atanassow, David Benson, Nick Benton, Karl Crary, Olivier Danvy, Mariangiola Dezani, Dan Friedman, Alwyn Goodloe, Pieter Hartel, Michael Hicks, Robert Irwin, Luis Lamb, Rod Moten, Rishiyur Nikhil, Tobias Nipkow, Jens Palsberg, and John Reynolds for contributing. Additional suggestions are welcome.

10 Papers Every Programmer Should Read (At Least Twice) I spent most of yesterday afternoon working on a paper I’m co-writing. It was one of those days when the writing came easy. I was moving from topic to topic, but then I realized that I was reaching too far backward – I was explaining things which I shouldn’t have had to explain to the audience I was trying to reach. When I first started writing, one of the pieces of advice that I heard was that you should always imagine that you are writing to a particular person.

Bit Twiddling Hacks By Sean Eron Anderson Individually, the code snippets here are in the public domain (unless otherwise noted) — feel free to use them however you please. The aggregate collection and descriptions are © 1997-2005 Sean Eron Anderson. Beginning Game Development: Part I – Introduction Part I – Introduction Welcome to the first article of an introductory series on game programming using the Microsoft .NET Framework and managed DirectX 9.0. This series as aimed at beginning programmers who are interested in developing a game for their own use with the .NET Framework and DirectX. The goal of this series is to have fun creating a game and learn game development and DirectX along the way. Game programming and DirectX have their own terms and definitions that can be difficult to understand, but after awhile, you’ll crack the code and be able to explore a new world of possibilities. I will keep things as straightforward as possible and decode terms as they appear.

13 Really Useful Online CSS Tools to Streamline Development CSS is nearly used on every modern website design. However, having to write and structure CSS code from scratch every time you have a project is extremely time consuming. Below, we present you with 13 amazingly useful CSS tools for hacking on writing time consuming code. We tried to place emphasis on unknown tools that every developer should have a looksy at, however don’t be surprised if we included a few known sources. Advanced Programming Languages Introduction Research Syntax Semantics Home Network Security This section provides a basic introduction to the technologies that underlie the Internet. It was written with the novice end-user in mind and is not intended to be a comprehensive survey of all Internet-based technologies. Subsections provide a short overview of each topic.

The Brainfuck Programming Language Brainfuck is the ungodly creation of Urban Müller, whose goal was apparently to create a Turing-complete language for which he could write the smallest compiler ever, for the Amiga OS 2.0. His compiler was 240 bytes in size. (Though he improved upon this later -- he informed me at one point that he had managed to bring it under 200 bytes.) 30 free programming eBooks - Since this post got quite popular I decided to incorporate some of the excellent suggestions posted in the comments, so this list now has more than 50 books in it. BTW: I’m not very strict on the definition of “ebook”, some of them are really just HTML versions of books. [UPDATED: 2012-01-18] Learning a new programming language always is fun and there are many great books legally available for free online. Here’s a selection of 30 of them:

A Simple JavasScript Preloader A JavaScript Preloader for HTML5 Apps PxLoader is a Javascript library that helps you download images, sound files or anything else you need before you take a specific action on your site (like showing a user interface or starting a game). You can use it to create a preloader for HTML5 games and websites. It let's you monitor download status by providing progress and completed events and it lets you prioritize the order in which items are downloaded. You can even tag groups of files and then prioritize downloads or register for events by tag. Hallmarks of a Great Developer - Test Guide If you ask me, I'll tell you a great developer Plans before coding A great developer takes the time to plan an approach before designing or coding. A great developer knows that the time required to do so will be more than paid back by the time saved by getting it more right the first time. A great developer plans all scales of work, from envisioning multiple versions of a product to writing or modifying a small method. Always knows why

Related:  EducateprogrammingLearning!Computer/g/Coding