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Eric Weisstein's World of Chemistry

Eric Weisstein's World of Chemistry
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Hi-Res Images of Hydrogen Nonmetal, mass: 1.008 u, 2 stable isotopes (1, 2), abundance rank (earth/space): 9/1 Click image to magnify. Vial of glowing ultrapure hydrogen, H2. Original size in cm: 1 x 5. Hydrogen is the lightest and simplest element and, with a ratio of 80%, is the main ingredient of the visible universe. 20% consist of helium, the ratio of the heavier elements is below 1%. Right: The Great Orion Nebula, 80% hydrogen. The images are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License, unless otherwise noted. Neutron stars M. Coleman Miller Professor of Astronomy, University of Maryland Welcome to my neutron star page! For those who want a quick intro to selected cool things about neutron stars and black holes, check out a poster I made for a science fair at the University of Chicago. I also have a link to some questions I have received about neutron stars, and my answers. Getting started on neutron stars Neutron stars are the collapsed cores of some massive stars. At these incredibly high densities, you could cram all of humanity into a volume the size of a sugar cube. All in all, these extremes mean that the study of neutron stars affords us some unique glimpses into areas of physics that we couldn't study otherwise. So, like, how do we get neutron stars? Neutron stars are believed to form in supernovae such as the one that formed the Crab Nebula (or check out this cool X-ray image of the nebula, from the Chandra X-ray Observatory). The guts of a neutron star The decline and fall of a neutron star

Alcoholic Liquor English Oatmeal Stout by BevShots Have you ever wondered what your favourite libation looks like under a microscope? Picture a scientist, drunk off White Russians; staring into his glass and thinking — I bet this would look really cool if I magnified it! To the Lab-Mobile! A few years and a few sloshy nights later, BevShots was born. A company that sells beautiful magnified prints of your favourite alcoholic drinks. Whiskey Magnified Gin Closeup The images are made by first crystallizing the drink of choice on a lab slide. Each image is created by using a pipette of each particular drink and squeezing a drop onto a slide. White Russian Tequila! Pina Colada Cocktails can have fruit and soft drinks in them which contain citric acids and complex sugars which dry out well and look great photographed. American Amber Ale Scotch Scotch Scotch. Vodka Tonic Some drinks such as vodka do not have as many impurities in them as cocktails such as a pina colada. Japanese Rice Lager English Pure Brewed Lager

Chemistry News Easier Way to Predict How Chemical Compounds Will Interact Apr. 25, 2018 — New research has revealed that simple, commercially available computer programmes could be used to design next generation drug-delivery systems by predicting more easily how different chemical ... read more Apr. 23, 2018 — Neutron scattering has revealed, in real time, the fundamental mechanisms behind the conversion of sunlight into energy in hybrid perovskite materials. A better understanding of this behavior will ... read more Apr. 20, 2018 — A novel solution to antimicrobial resistance -- medical chemists discover peptic ulcer treatment metallodrug effective in 'taming' ... read more Apr. 20, 2018 — A new theory of how compression and tension can affect the reactivity of metal catalysts could be helpful in designing new and better ... read more Porous Salts for Fuel Cells Apr. 19, 2018 — Getting the results of a cancer biopsy can take up to two weeks. Portable Device to Sniff out Trapped Humans

WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements Artificial Robotic Hand Transmits Feeling To Nerves Astro Teller has an unusual way of starting a new project: He tries to kill it. Teller is the head of X, formerly called Google X, the advanced technology lab of Alphabet. At X’s headquarters not far from the Googleplex in Mountain View, Calif., Teller leads a group of engineers, inventors, and designers devoted to futuristic “moonshot” projects like self-driving cars, delivery drones, and Internet-beaming balloons. To turn their wild ideas into reality, Teller and his team have developed a unique approach. It starts with trying to prove that whatever it is that you’re trying to do can’t be done—in other words, trying to kill your own idea. As Teller explains, “Instead of saying, ‘What’s most fun to do about this or what’s easiest to do first?’ The ideas that survive get additional rounds of scrutiny, and only a tiny fraction eventually becomes official projects; the proposals that are found to have an Achilles’ heel are discarded, and Xers quickly move on to their next idea.

Personal and Historical Perspectives of Hans Bethe How do Pop Rocks candy work?" "Pop Rocks" is an extremely cool candy to some people, but to other people it is just plain weird and they won't touch the stuff. Regardless of which view you subscribe to, you have to admit that it is definitely a technology candy -- nothing in nature works like Pop Rocks do! So how do they work? Here's the basic idea. To make Pop Rocks, the hot sugar mixture is allowed to mix with carbon dioxide gas at about 600 pounds per square inch (psi). When you put the candy in your mouth, it melts (just like hard candy) and releases the bubbles with a loud POP!

Royal Society of Chemistry | Advancing the Chemical Sciences UNC Chemistry Fundamentals An Interactive Educational Exercise Because of special formatting tags needed to display exponents, this site is best viewed with Netscape 3.0 or higher. If needed, use the link under Useful Materials to download Netscape About the Chemistry Fundamentals Course This exercise is designed for anyone who wants an introduction or review of the fundamentals of chemistry that will be used in freshman level chemistry classes. This interactive course was used for the first time during the summer of 1997. Evaluations from last year's materials suggested that, while the mathematics and calculator sections were useful, one of the most appreciated benefits of the materials was the review of basic high school chemistry. Currently, this site is used as a resource that can be beneficial to any student that is enrolled in a freshman chemistry course. About these materials How to use these materials The basic procedure is as follows:Take the pre-test for a certain sections. About the Sidebar

Penn study shows why sleep is needed to form memories PHILADELPHIA – If you ever argued with your mother when she told you to get some sleep after studying for an exam instead of pulling an all-nighter, you owe her an apology, because it turns out she's right. And now, scientists are beginning to understand why. In research published this week in Neuron, Marcos Frank, PhD, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience, at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, postdoctoral researcher Sara Aton, PhD, and colleagues describe for the first time how cellular changes in the sleeping brain promote the formation of memories. "This is the first real direct insight into how the brain, on a cellular level, changes the strength of its connections during sleep," Frank says. The findings, says Frank, reveal that the brain during sleep is fundamentally different from the brain during wakefulness. "We find that the biochemical changes are simply not happening in the neurons of animals that are awake," Frank says. A molecular explanation is emerging.

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