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Centralia, Pennsylvania. All properties in the borough were claimed under eminent domain and therein condemned by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1992 and Centralia's ZIP code was revoked by the Postal Service in 2002.[6] State and local officials reached an agreement with the remaining residents on October 29, 2013, allowing them to live out their lives there, after which the rights of their properties will be taken through eminent domain.[7] History[edit] Early history[edit]

Centralia, Pennsylvania

Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About. Scientists scanning the human brain can now tell whom a person is thinking of, the first time researchers have been able to identify what people are imagining from imaging technologies.

Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About

Work to visualize thought is starting to pile up successes. Recently, scientists have used brain scans to decode imagery directly from the brain, such as what number people have just seen and what memory a person is recalling. They can now even reconstruct videos of what a person has watched based on their brain activity alone. Cornell University cognitive neuroscientist Nathan Spreng and his colleagues wanted to carry this research one step further by seeing if they could deduce the mental pictures of people that subjects conjure up in their heads.

“We are trying to understand the physical mechanisms that allow us to have an inner world, and a part of that is how we represent other people in our mind,” Spreng says. “Humans are social creatures, and the social world is a complex place,” Spreng says. 6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America. When it comes to the birth of America, most of us are working from a stew of elementary school history lessons, Westerns and vague Thanksgiving mythology.

6 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About the Founding of America

And while it's not surprising those sources might biff a couple details, what's shocking is how much less interesting the version we learned was. It turns out our teachers, Hollywood and whoever we got our Thanksgiving mythology from (Big Turkey?) All made America's origin story far more boring than it actually was for some very disturbing reasons. For instance ... #6. How to Tell if Your City is Dying. Geodesic dome. Typically a geodesic dome design begins with an icosahedron inscribed in a hypothetical sphere, tiling each triangular face with smaller triangles, then projecting the vertices of each tile to the sphere.

Geodesic dome

The endpoints of the links of the completed sphere are the projected endpoints on the sphere's surface. If this is done exactly, sub-triangle edge lengths take on many different values, requiring links of many sizes. To minimize this, simplifications are made. The most beautiful suicide. On May 1, 1947, Evelyn McHale leapt to her death from the observation deck of the Empire State Building.

The most beautiful suicide

Photographer Robert Wiles took a photo of McHale a few minutes after her death. The photo ran a couple of weeks later in Life magazine accompanied by the following caption: On May Day, just after leaving her fiancé, 23-year-old Evelyn McHale wrote a note. 'He is much better off without me ... Haast's eagle. The Haast's eagle (Harpagornis moorei) is an extinct species of eagle that once lived in the South Island of New Zealand, commonly accepted to be the Pouakai of Maori legend.[1] The species was the largest eagle known to have existed.

Haast's eagle

Its primary prey was suspected to consist of moa. This eagle's massive size may have been an evolutionary response to the size of its prey, as both would have been much smaller when they first came to the island, and would have grown larger over time due to lack of competition (see island gigantism). Haast's eagle became extinct around 1400, when its major food source, the moa, were hunted to extinction by Maori, and much of its dense-forest habitat was cleared by them. Taxonomy[edit] Evolution[edit] Description[edit] Artist's rendition of a Haast's eagle attacking moa Haast's eagles were one of the largest known true raptors.

They had a relatively short wingspan for their size. Behaviour[edit] Extinction[edit] Relationship with humans[edit] 100+ LGBTQ Black Women You Should Know: The Epic Black History Month Megapost. Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and transgender women represent a vibrant and visible portion of the LGBTQ community.

100+ LGBTQ Black Women You Should Know: The Epic Black History Month Megapost

In addition to the legends of the Harlem Renaissance and the decades of groundbreaking activism spearheaded by women like Audre Lorde, Barbara Smith and Angela Davis, many of the most prominent coming out stories of the past two years have been black women like Brittney Griner, Raven-Symonè, Diana King and Robin Roberts. Meanwhile, Laverne Cox and Janet Mock have become the most visible transgender women in media. So, in honor of Black History Month, below you’ll find over 100 lesbian, bisexual, gay, queer and transgender women you should know about. If she was still alive, the oldest person in this list would be 189 years old.

The youngest person on this list is a mere 21 years of age. Keep in mind, there are so many more prominent black LGBT women than are represented below. Frances E.W. Edmonia “Wildfire” Lewis (1844-1907), Sculptor. Two-Spirit. "Berdache" redirects here.

Two-Spirit

For the glaive polearm, see Bardiche. Two-Spirit (also two spirit or twospirit) is a modern umbrella term used by some indigenous North Americans to describe gender-variant individuals in their communities.[1] The term was adopted in 1990 at an Indigenous lesbian and gay international gathering to encourage the replacement of the anthropological term berdache.[2] It is a spiritual role that is recognized and confirmed by the Two-Spirit's indigenous community. While some have found the term a useful tool for intertribal organizing, not all Native cultures conceptualize gender this way, and most tribes use names in their own languages.[2][3] While pan-Indian terms are not always appropriate or welcome, the term has generally received more acceptance and use than the term it replaced.[2] Third and fourth gender roles traditionally embodied by two-spirit people include performing work and wearing clothing associated with both men and women.

Terminology[edit] Stonewall riots. The Stonewall Inn, taken September 1969.

Stonewall riots

The sign in the window reads: "We homosexuals plead with our people to please help maintain peaceful and quiet conduct on the streets of the Village—Mattachine. "[1] The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the gay (LGBT) community[note 1] against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, located in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. They are widely considered to constitute the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.[2][3] Very few establishments welcomed openly gay people in the 1950s and 1960s. After the Stonewall riots, gays and lesbians in New York City faced gender, race, class, and generational obstacles to becoming a cohesive community. Background[edit]