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10 Tips for (journalists) Designing Infographics

10 Tips for (journalists) Designing Infographics
This article was originally published on “Digital Newsgathering”, a class blog for Journalism 226 at San Francisco State University, Instructor: Staci Baird. I wrote this post as a guest author, and with permission I am republishing it here. Assuming you’re not working for a media corporation with huge graphics and statistics departments at your disposal, you may want to create some infographics for your own articles. With today’s flood of information, infographics allow readers to quickly digest and understand complex data. A good infographic will not only inform readers, but will also create interest and convince people to read your article similar to how good headlines and photos attract readers. In contrast, both boring and overly complex graphics will quickly convince readers to ignore your article. Here are 10 tips for designing better infographics (click the images to go to their original sites): 1) Be Concise: Design your infographic to convey one idea really well. Related:  Information and Knowledge ManagementData Management

20+ Tools to Create Your Own Infographics A picture is worth a thousand words – based on this, infographics would carry hundreds of thousands of words, yet if you let a reader choose between a full-length 1000-word article and an infographic that needs a few scroll-downs, they’d probably prefer absorbing information straight from the infographic. What’s not to like? Colored charts and illustrations deliver connections better than tables and figures and as users spend time looking back and forth the full infographic, they stay on the site longer. Plus, readers who like what they see are more likely to share visual guides more than articles. While not everyone can make infographics from scratch, there are tools available on the Web that will help you create your very own infographics. Read Also: The Infographic Revolution: Where Do We Go From Here? What About Me? “What About Me?” Vizualize.me Vizualize.me allows you to create an online resume format that is beautiful, relevant and fun, all with just one click. Piktochart easel.ly

David McCandless So you want to be a Data Visualization Librarian? So you know that you want to be a librarian, but have you thought about specializing in a certain field? Maybe you have an interest in emerging technologies or you want to work with researchers and students across the disciplines? Data visualization is a hot topic in librarianship, and specializations in data analytics and visualization is an exciting area of growth in the profession. I sat down with four visualization specialists who work within the University of Michigan Library system to get an idea of what their jobs entail. Meet our contributors: Marci Brandenburg is a bioinformationist at the Taubman Health Sciences Library at the University of Michigan. Justin Joque is a visualization librarian at the University of Michigan Library. Stephanie O’Malley is an Interactive Imaging and Production Specialist at the University of Michigan’s 3D Lab. Ted Hall is an Advanced Visualization Specialist also at the University of Michigan’s 3D Lab. 1. 2. 3. 4. Stephanie: I would say think big.

9 Ways You Can Improve Your Infographic Pitches to Blogs & Websites Over the past year, I’ve worked on approximately 20 different infographics for a single client. One of the most frustrating things about the process has been the unevenness of the response. Even if we do everything seemingly right, an infographic might not take off. After a string of disappointing infographics, I decided to go back over every step and figure out what we had missed. After fixing the way we work with our design firm (hint: for best results, compile your own research and craft your infographic’s storyline before handing it off), we revamped our outreach process. Infographics are a unique type of content. But the bottom line is that standards are going to be different. Is it correct? Once all this sunk in, we started debugging our outreach process. The following checklist is based on my experience and their advice, and designed to improve your outreach messages. What Works Personalize. What Doesn’t Work? Image Credit: Ivan Cash

10 best book and library infographics of 2015 In the list below, you’ll find the most spectacular and engaging infographics about books, libraries, and reading, that were created in 2015. Infographics are still one of the greatest and most appealing ways of sharing facts, numbers, mechanisms, and ideas. When it comes to books, libraries, and everything related to writing and reading, it was a good year. And very well documented in numerous charts, infographics, and other visuals. One big trend to observe in 2015 was about highlighting characters, objects, props, or quotes from the works of literature. We’ve seen memorable literary animals, plants, or monsters. There is also an infographic (and you can see it below) that lists most famous fictional books – the ones you can read about in other books, but can’t actually read. Click or tap on each infographic to open it in full resolution. 10 best book and library infographics of 2015 1. Parents don’t have to be convinced their children should be reading more. ⇢ Credits and more info 2. 3.

Data, data everywhere WHEN the Sloan Digital Sky Survey started work in 2000, its telescope in New Mexico collected more data in its first few weeks than had been amassed in the entire history of astronomy. Now, a decade later, its archive contains a whopping 140 terabytes of information. A successor, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, due to come on stream in Chile in 2016, will acquire that quantity of data every five days. Such astronomical amounts of information can be found closer to Earth too. All these examples tell the same story: that the world contains an unimaginably vast amount of digital information which is getting ever vaster ever more rapidly. But they are also creating a host of new problems. Alex Szalay, an astrophysicist at Johns Hopkins University, notes that the proliferation of data is making them increasingly inaccessible. Epistemologically speaking, information is made up of a collection of data and knowledge is made up of different strands of information. More of everything

40 Useful and Creative Infographics Six Revisions Menu Main Categories CSS HTML JavaScript Web Design WordPress Web Development Design Inspiration UX Design UI Design Freebies Tutorials Tools Links About Contact Advertise RSS Twitter Facebook 40 Useful and Creative Infographics By Jacob Gube Information graphics (or infographics) are graphical depictions of data and information. In this collection, you’ll find forty beautiful and educational infographics, displaying the uncommon spectacle of "art meets science". 1. The proportion of ingredients for popular coffee drinks and their pronunciation keys. 2. This infographic showcases the history of the Swine Flu, starting from 1976. 3. 4. 5. The top breweries and beers in the U.S. 6. 7. 389 Years Ago A rundown of the historic events in African-American culture. 8. 9. 10. 11. An illustrated guide at how the Global Warming phenomenon works. 13. A packed visual piece on tobacco chemicals and tobacco trade worldwide. 14. 15. 16. A graphical representation of consumer spending across the globe. 17.

The 7 ½ Steps to Successful Infographics You know when you’ve been doing something for a long time and it gets ingrained? For me, that’s infographics. I’ve created a lot of chartage over the last 20 years Take a look: Here’s me when I started at the New York Times, where I was a graphics editor. I worked there for 15 years, on all the news desks, with the investigative team, and ran the biz section graphics desk. The middle i.d. is my stint at Fortune Magazine, where I was the Infographics director and got to work with the awesome folks at CNNMoney.com (I’m fading!). Anyway, when Nishant from MIX asked me to write about what I do, it was kind of arresting, like the time that Montana patrolman intercepted my husband doing 94 on a long stretch of highway. So here I am, pulling over. 1. Where does one procure an idea? Usually they’re found in the shower. Don’t wake up with an idea? Our stories are driven by the news, so our graphics are framed by ‘what’s new’ and sometimes ‘what’s different’ and hopefully, ‘what’s relevant.’ 2. 3.

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