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The Tower of London: an introduction

The Tower of London: an introduction

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6iUU9wbM3k

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How the Mind Works: 10 Fascinating TED Talks How memory works, what visual illusions reveal, the price of happiness, the power of introverts and more… 1. Peter Doolittle: How “working memory” works Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. If you would like to suggest another topic, please send it and a set of questions to begin the topic. Copyright © 1997-2010 by The Internet TESL Journal Pages from this site should not be put online elsewhere.Permission is not required to link directly to any page on our site as long as you do not trap the page inside a frame.

Stonehenge - Tour around Britain Stonehenge is a mystical place. Its stone circles are probably more than 4,000 years old. The huge stones come from an area about 30 km north of Stonehenge. 150 Years of The Tube- listening comprehension activity You are going to listen to a radio clip about the London Undergrounddo a comprehension activity Discuss Does your city have a metro or underground railway?How old is it?

Listening: A Tour of London Tower Bridge, London (Copyright: Getty) When you visit a city for the first time, a good way to explore it is to go on an organised sightseeing tour. The tour will give you an overview of what there is to see and also provide you with some historical background. TEDx Talks How much do we really know about our food? Our global food system is precariously reliant on large, non-agile systems that offer little information about the source of our food and leaves much of the world's population struggling with food insecurity. The desire to better understand what makes it to our plate has sparked local and slow food movements, however, these strategies are not alone scalable to feed the next 2 billion people. Telephoning in English Here are some useful tips and phrases for making telephone calls in English. Spelling on the phone If you need to spell your name, or take the name of your caller, the biggest problem is often saying vowel sounds: 'a' is pronounced as in 'may''e' is pronounced as in 'email' or 'he''i' is pronounced as in 'I' or 'eye''o' is pronounced as in 'no''u' is pronounced as 'you' Saying consonants'g' is pronounced like the 'j' in 'jeans''j' is pronounced as in 'DJ' or 'Jane''w' is pronounced 'double you''x' is pronounced 'ex''y' is pronounced 'why''z' is pronounced 'zed' (rhymes with 'bed' in British English), or 'zee' (rhymes with 'sea' in American English).

Let's talk about the UK (still with Scotland) At the beginning of the new school year teachers usually explain to their students what they are going to study. Sometimes efl teachers not only teach grammar but also British culture, so one of the first cultural topics they discuss with their students are the geography of the UK and its form of government. Here you can find an interactive mindmap, a digital poster and a collection of useful websites, just to simplify the work. Click on the Glogster digital poster below, you will find general information about the United Kingdom and some videos.

Sherlock Holmes' London In the novels, the legendary detective Sherlock Holmes lived and solved many mysteries in Victorian London. London is the only city where you can feel what it is like to walk in Sherlock's footsteps and visit his home. The BBC series, Sherlock, stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman as modern day interpretations of the classic Conan Doyle characters, Sherlock Holmes and Dr John Watson. David Epstein: Are athletes really getting faster, better, stronger? When you look at sporting achievements over the last decades, it seems like humans have gotten faster, better and stronger in nearly every way. Yet as David Epstein points out in this delightfully counter-intuitive talk, we might want to lay off the self-congratulation. Many factors are at play in shattering athletic records, and the development of our natural talents is just one of them. This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

Wooden Spoon Speculations Copyright © 2014 Emma Gore-Lloyd I found this game on a party games website sometime a couple of years ago. It’s a guessing game that works well in a class of students who are fairly comfortable with each other and have a good sense of humour.

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