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Center for Biological Diversity

Center for Biological Diversity

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/

Related:  Biodiversity in India

Wolves Come Home to Oregon Wolves in Oregon Gray wolves (Canis lupus) were once common in Oregon, occupying most of the state. However, a deliberate effort to eradicate the species was successful by the late 1940s. In fact, trouble for wolves began almost 100 years earlier, in the years before Oregon became a state. In 1843 the first wolf bounty was established and Oregon's first legislative session was called in part to address the "problem of marauding wolves." By 1913, people could collect a $5 state bounty and an Oregon State Game Commission bounty of $20. 7 Extinct Animals: Rare Photographs Last Thylacine yawning: Note the unusual extent to which it was able to open its jaws From panthers and pandas to rhinos and tigers, dwindling animal numbers speak of the need to step up conservation efforts – if it’s not already too late. As a kind of wake-up call, we decided to take a look at seven extinct species captured on camera. With modern photography having only been invented in the 1820s, these snapshots are visible testament to just how recently the creatures shown were wiped out – and a jarring reminder of the precarious situation for many species still left on the planet.

Indian Botanists: Plant Vs Plant, and what about stars? Gangadhar Panday Founder Babul Films Society- non-profit NGO It is an ancient Indian tradition to plant trees corresponding to each sign of the moon. FWS designates critical habitat for imperiled Southern Calif. plant E&E News , February 13, 2013 FWS designates critical habitat for imperiled Southern Calif. plant Laura Petersen, E&E reporter The Obama administration yesterday designated 9,600 acres in Southern California's Coachella Valley as critical habitat for an endangered plant. The Riverside County area -- known for its big spring music festival and booming development -- is home to the Coachella Valley milk vetch, a flowering foot-tall plant added to the endangered species list in 1998. Dependent on sandy dunes and flats, the milk vetch has been nearly wiped out by development sprawling east of Los Angeles.

Indian Botanists: Light Action and Camera with Plant Sciences (Series-1: Indian Cinema born with Botany) Gangadhar Panday Actor & short filmmaker. Author runs Babul Films to spread ecological awareness. Email: gangadhar@babulfilms.in Indian Botanists: Will 'Glowing Plants' Replace Street Lights? Gangadhar Panday Actor & short filmmaker Email: gangadhar@babulfilms.in Can you recall the glowing vegetation in Avatar, an Oscar winning sci-fi movie by James Cameroon? Send a voice message to BabulFilms 4 Eco-awarenes (babulfilms) 1. Adjust your microphone volume 2. Click Allow to enable your microphone We would love to hear from you!Please record your message.

Students become ‘eco doctor,’ test globe Cashing in on the craze among the youngsters about uploading their pictures in different poses to the social media networking sites, city-based EGREE Foundation has conducted a novel event on the sidelines of the International Biodiversity Day celebrations here. ‘Eco Doctor’ is the concept designed by Hyderabad-based Babul Film Society, co-sponsor of the programme, in which all the participating students were given doctor’s coat and stethoscope and were asked to test the globe. The idea is to create awareness among the students about the need for protecting the environment and make them contribute their mite to protect the ecosystem. Students participated in the photo session enthusiastically, following an assurance from the organisers that the photographs would be sent to them immediately after the event, so that they could upload the same on their social networking sites.

International Day for Biological Diversity - 22 May 2015 - Biodiversity for Sustainable Development Biodiversity for Sustainable DevelopmentThis year’s theme reflects the importance of efforts made at all levels to establish a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as part of the United Nations Post-2015 Development Agenda for the period of 2015-2030 and the relevance of biodiversity for the achievement of sustainable development. The selection of the theme also underlines the adoption of the Gangwon Declaration, by ministers and participants to the High-level Segment of the twelfth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The Gangwon Declaration welcomed the importance given to biodiversity in the outcome document of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals and called for the further integration and mainstreaming of biodiversity in the Post-2015 Development Agenda.

7 new frog species reported from Western Ghats and Sri Lanka A team of researchers from India and Sri Lanka has discovered seven new species of golden-backed frogs in the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka global biodiversity hotspot, throwing new light on the highly distinct and diverse fauna in the two countries. The results of the decade-long survey published in the latest issue of Contributions to Zoology, an international journal brought out by the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in the Netherlands, show that the frogs in Sri Lanka and those in India belong to distinctly different species. It was earlier believed that some of the golden-backed frogs (Genus Hylarana) found in the two countries were of the same species. DNA study The team, led by Delhi University’s Prof.

BBC News - World wildlife populations halved in 40 years - report 29 September 2014Last updated at 17:29 ET By Roger Harrabin BBC environment analyst In Nepal, habitat loss and hunting have reduced tigers from 100,000 a century ago to just 3,000 The global loss of species is even worse than previously thought, the London Zoological Society (ZSL) says in its new Living Planet Index.

Tiger died of shock: Autopsy Hyderabad: The killing of a tiger in Nagarjunasagar Srisailam Tiger Reserve near Mannanur in the Nallamalais took a new turn on Friday as the Mahbubnagar police booked a case against the person who had alerted the authorities in the first place. Cases were booked against P. Vedantam, a news contributor of a vernacular daily, a teacher, an electricity department employee, a driver and others for entering the forest without the permission of the department. The case was based on a complaint filed by Mannanur forest range officer B. Lakshman. The forest department has also booked a preliminary offence report under several sections of the Wildlife Protection Act.

Related:  BiologyImpact Environnemental en général/ Environment ImpactPacific Wolf Coalition