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Grammar Newsletter - English Grammar Newsletter

Grammar Newsletter - English Grammar Newsletter
With Grammar.net's Grammar Checker you can check and correct grammar and spelling mistakes and use Thesaurus feature to find synonyms. It’s easy to check your texts using our Grammar Checker – just download this Free program. Then you need to highlight the text you want to check and press CTRL+G button. Or use Grammar.net's Rich Text for editing and checking your text with rich mark-up, just copy-paste it and then check your text. Grammar mistakes are underlined with a green wave line and spelling errors with a red one. To correct mistakes you just need to select a word from the Suggestions list.

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Randy Glasbergen - Today's Cartoon Education Cartoons by Randy Glasbergen. My Education Cartoons are available at budget-friendly rates for magazines, newspapers, books, presentations, newsletters, websites, social media, greeting cards, advertising, calendars, textbooks, any kind of print or electronic media. To use a cartoon from my website, please contact me for authorization and a rate quote. Day 10 of my Grammarly Christmas: an activity for teaching there is/are Welcome once again to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now day ten of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon! Today’s post focuses on a great tool for teaching there is/there are… Being an expat English language teacher, it shouldn’t be too surprising that I’m something of a traveler and a geography nut. I love the natural world and exploring all it has to offer, especially when I get the chance to use this theme in the classroom.

Punctuation Rules Commas and periods are the most frequently used punctuation marks. Commas customarily indicate a brief pause; they're not as final as periods. Rule 1. Use commas to separate words and word groups in a simple series of three or more items. Lesson Plans to Download This page was originally designed to share my materials with other English teaching assistants in France, especially those who have no experience in teaching ESL yet. I've also included worksheets that I used for private English lessons in France as well as some of the materials I used in my ESL classes in the United States. Feel free to use them as you'd like. Some of the lessons listed under the Assistant section can also be used for private lessons and vice versa. There is a page of English grammar if you need a review.

Language Exchange - Find conversation partners & improve your speaking We have over 100,000 users waiting to meet you. Find native speakers to improve and practice your foreign language skills. Connect with them using email, chat or send them a personal message on their wall. REL Northwest Serving Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington Connections Between Teacher Perceptions of School Effectiveness and Student Outcomes in Idaho’s Low-Achieving SchoolsAre teacher perceptions of school effectiveness reflected in student outcomes? Find out what we learned in our new report. REL Northwest is part of the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Program funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences. Operated by Education Northwest for nearly 50 years, REL Northwest serves the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

Day 9 of my Grammarly Christmas: fun and motivating grammar activities for beginner classes Welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ For twelve days in the month of December I’m posting either an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and sometimes maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the ninth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m moving slowly but surely towards the end of my blogging marathon! Grammar exercises are a fundamental ingredient of many language lessons, but can become a bit of a drag for both us and our learners if we’re not careful.

How is "contrarily" different from either "conversely" or "inversely" The three words have a similar flavor and considerable overlap. Prefer contrarily when you are emphasizing disagreement. Prefer conversely when things are flipped over where left becomes right and right becomes left. Prefer inversely when thing are flipped such that top becomes bottom and bottom becomes top. worksheets Free ESL EFL English worksheets, lessons and resources for teachers and adult learners of ESL – English as a second language. Our free English lesson resources are designed for teachers and adult language learners of English as a second operating language. The context and topics used in the free ESL lesson plans, worksheets, printables and grammar exercises on our site are specifically designed around either business themes, or topics that have real day-to-day context for adult students of English. To access the materials on our site, there are a number of ways to find what you are looking for. The easiest is to select Free ESL Lessons on the top menu to access all our resources. You can use the Search Box in the sidebar, which is available on every page, or select from the list of Categories, or pick a topic from the Tag Cloud.

About 6+1 Trait® Writing Working together, teachers and Education Northwest curriculum experts developed the 6+1 Trait® Writing Model in the early 1980s. But, the framework remains even more relevant today as trait-based instruction helps students achieve the high-quality writing called for in the Common Core State Standards. Our 6+1 Trait® Writing Model of Instruction & Assessment is now used in virtually every state in the country, not to mention countries from American Samoa and China to Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. It's the model or the source of the model used to score student papers in numerous state and district assessments throughout the nation.

Day 8 of my Grammarly Christmas: demonstrative adjectives and pronouns A very warm welcome back to my ‘12 Grammarly Days of Christmas.’ To bring you up to speed if you haven’t been frequenting the blog recently, every day for twelve days I’m posting an infographic highlighting the rules that govern the ways we use a certain grammatical point, along with ideas to help those of us who get confused by said grammar point, and maybe even a few activities thrown in for good measure. Today is now the eighth day of my Christmas marathon which means I’m well and truly on the downward slope and can see light at the end of the tunnel! Let’s continue with another old classic, demonstratives…

The Oxford Comma-otion Share “Who gives a [insert expletive] about an Oxford comma,” asked the Vampire Weekend boys in 2008, shocking many an English teacher and publishing industry professional. Now, three years later, the usefulness of the oxford comma (also known as the serial comma) has come into question again. Let me preface this article by assuaging your worried souls: despite rumours to the contrary, the Oxford comma is not dead. On Wednesday last week news that the Oxford style guide had declared that the Oxford comma as a “general rule” should be avoided went viral faster than Usain Bolt.

English usage If you're trying to improve your conversational English, you're in the right place. The sections below include a variety of references on everyday English usage from an American English perspective. Whether you need to expand your vocabulary, master some new idioms, or pick a good English name, these pages will serve you well. Vocabulary

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