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Plagiarism

Plagiarism
You have something in common with the smartest people in the world. You see, everyone has ideas. We use our minds to create something original, whether it’s a poem, a drawing, a song, or a scientific paper. Some of the most important ideas are published and make it into books, journals, newspapers and trustworthy websites that become the building blocks for things we all learn. But ideas are also very personal, and we need dependable ways to keep track of the people behind the ideas we use because they deserve credit for their contribution, just as you do if someone uses your idea. Passing off another person’s ideas or words as your own, without credit, is called plagiarism. Meet Cassie, a university student. She’s not the kind of person who would plagiarize by turning in someone else’s work, but she is aware that plagiarism can happen accidentally, so she follows some basic rules: Second, she’s careful to use only her own words when she’s not quoting directly.

http://www.commoncraft.com/video/plagiarism

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4 Great Online Citation Tools For Students (for MLA, APA, or Chicago Manual of Style citation styles) Guest post by Johnamarie Macias This time of year, many students are knee-deep in writing papers and other assignments that may require citing sources. One thing is for sure: few students enjoy creating citations in the required citation styles. However, there are tools out there that can help students understand the breakdown of citations. Following are several online citation builders that are geared towards helping students with the main academic citation styles: American Psychological Association (APA), Modern Language Association (MLA), and Chicago Manual of Style. Even though these online citation builders have been developed to provide consistent citations with the rules set out by the citation style guides, users are ultimately responsible for the citations and should be sure to proofread them for accuracy.

The Art of Being Right The Art of Being Right: 38 Ways to Win an Argument (1831) (Eristische Dialektik: Die Kunst, Recht zu Behalten) is an acidulous and sarcastic treatise written by the German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer in sarcastic deadpan.[1] In it, Schopenhauer examines a total of thirty-eight methods of showing up one's opponent in a debate. He introduces his essay with the idea that philosophers have concentrated in ample measure on the rules of logic, but have not (especially since the time of Immanuel Kant) engaged with the darker art of the dialectic, of controversy. Whereas the purpose of logic is classically said to be a method of arriving at the truth, dialectic, says Schopenhauer, "...on the other hand, would treat of the intercourse between two rational beings who, because they are rational, ought to think in common, but who, as soon as they cease to agree like two clocks keeping exactly the same time, create a disputation, or intellectual contest." Publication[edit]

Writing "Original” Papers § Harvard Guide to Using Sources Some writing assignments you receive at Harvard will explicitly ask you to present an "original" thesis, claim, or idea. But even when the word "original" isn't mentioned, you should assume that your professor expects you to develop a thesis that is the product of your own thinking and not something drawn directly from a source and planted in your paper. Occasionally an assignment will require only a summary of your reading, particularly if the instructor wants to make sure you have understood a particularly complex concept; however, some assignments may be worded in a way that leaves expectations ambiguous (you may be asked, for example, to "discuss" or "consider" a source), and you may think you are only expected to summarize when, in fact, you are expected to make an argument. When in doubt about whether you are supposed to make an argument in your paper, always check with your instructor to make sure you understand what you're expected to do.

Moglue: Create interactive ebooks and release as apps! Featured Post What it is: I never learned HTML, sure I know a few basics but nothing that will build me a good looking, functional website. Wix has long been my secret weapon. How Google Impacts The Way Students Think How Google Impacts The Way Students Think by Terry Heick It’s always revealing to watch learners research. When trying to understand complex questions often as part of multi-step projects, they often simply “Google it.” Why do people migrate?

The Power of Google Google.com is pretty self explanatory. Right? If you said yes, there’s a good chance you’re not using Google to its full potential. Recently, I found that there’s this complete underground world of mind-blowing search tools for Google, never before mentioned to me. The infographic says that three out of every four students couldn’t perform a “well-executed search”. Typing “regular show death punchies” instead of simply “regular show” does not constitute a well-executed search. Chickens, Clouds and the View Outside Your Window Photo Each Friday we post three Common Core-aligned reading and writing tasks inspired by New York Times content, and classroom-designed and tested by the teachers Sarah Gross and Jonathan Olsen, along with their ninth-grade humanities students. Tell us what you think, and how you use The Times to teach and learn. Common Core Practice Tasks | Week of Oct. 22 – 26, 2012

How To Make Students Better Online Researchers I recently came across an article in Wired Magazine called “ Why Kids Can’t Search “. I’m always interested in this particular topic, because it’s something I struggle with in my middle and high school classes constantly, and I know I’m not alone in my frustrations. Getting kids to really focus on what exactly they are searching for, and then be able to further distill idea into a few key specific search terms is a skill that we must teach students, and we have to do it over and over again. We never question the vital importance of teaching literacy, but we have to be mindful that there are many kinds of “literacies”.

Beyond the Book Report: Ways to Respond to Literature Using New York Times Models Victor J. Blue for The New York TimesWord, a bookstore in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, provides guidance to browsers with irreverent “shelf talkers,” like this one for “The Book of Night Women,” by Marlon James.Go to related article » | Go to related slide show » Below, we present some alternatives to that classic classroom assignment, the book report. a literature review as collective and inner library I recently mentioned in passing in this blog, in relation to writing book reviews in fact, the book by Pierre Bayard provocatively entitled How to talk about books you haven’t read (2007). I want to suggest now that this is actually a book worth reading – not so that you can literally do what the title suggests, although you might feel this is very acceptable after you’ve read it – but rather worth reading for the key points that Bayard makes. I contend that these are as relevant to academic reading – and the dreaded ‘literature review’ in particular – as any of the how-to-do it texts, including my own. The first section of the book – on books you haven’t read, books you’ve skimmed, books you’ve never heard of and books you’ve forgotten – contains ideas highly relevant to academic work.

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