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What Is The Role Of Content In Flipped Classrooms?

What Is The Role Of Content In Flipped Classrooms?
In a flipped classroom, students ‘attend’ the lesson outside of the classroom, typically in the form of teacher presentation videos or animated slide shows that can be viewed online, and in more sophisticated instances, followed by some diagnostic tests to indicate the progress of each student in the understanding of the material presented in that lesson. The intent is for students to know enough of the topic (to be taught in class) and, having reflected adequately on the ideas they encountered at home, return to class with questions to clarify their understanding. The benefits of a flipped classroom are progressively recognized and relatively well-documented (Fulton, 2012; Bergmann & Sams, 2013; Bergmann 2011; Ash, 2012). In its ideal state, a flipped classroom can transform the learning experience of students. Why Flip? Getting students to spend more time studying or learning can be a tall order, especially when faced with a topic that they do not see much need for knowing.

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10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom 10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom by Kelly Walsh, emergingedtech.com What have you heard about the flipped classroom? That it’s just the latest education fad? Evaluating Technology Use in the Classroom Evaluating the use of technology in a classroom environment is not something most administrators are trained to do. It is easy to walk into a classroom and see that every student is using a computer, but how do you really assess if and what type of learning is taking place? In the past, I have had administrators tell me “I walked into the teacher’s room and all the students were on laptops.”

Mme Burton: Flip Your Classroom Here it is!! Introducing my new website to help teachers to flip: flip.mrsburton.com Welcome to my Flipped Classroom page! If you are here, you are probably looking for resources that you could use to impliment the Flipped Method in your classroom. My story goes like this: I started flipped to help my level 2 French students improve their scores. Assessment Strategies for Flipped Learning Experiences Flipped classroom assessment strategies that work It goes without saying that the flipped class design differs in fundamental ways from more traditional learning environments. Knowing which tool to use and at what time can help you monitor students' progress and make efficient changes to the course design throughout the school year. Assessment Strategies for Flipped Learning Experiences, a Magna Online Seminar, aims to show educators in flipped learning classrooms the assessment options available and how to use them for the best results.

Three Good Tools for Building Flipped Lessons That Include Assessment Tools In the right setting the flipped classroom model can work well for some teachers and students. I recently received an email from a reader who was looking for a recommendation for a tool would enable her to add an assessment aspect to her flipped lesson. Here are some tools that can accomplish that goal. eduCanon is a free service for creating, assigning, and tracking your students' progress on flipped lessons. eduCanon allows teachers to build flipped lessons using YouTube and Vimeo videos, create questions about the videos, then assign lessons to their students. Teachers can track the progress of their students within eduCanon. To create lessons start by identifying a topic and objective then searching YouTube and Vimeo from within the eduCanon site.

The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea Check out my two-part Education Week Teacher series on the flipped classroom here I’m a bit wary/skeptical about whole “Flipped Classroom” idea and how it works in practice. Diana Laufenberg spoke for me, also, in some of her tweets about the concept: But I’m still open to learning, and I invite your suggestions for additions to list. In the meantime, though, here are some posts that some of my questions more eloquently than I could: The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. They had a lot of students that regularly missed class and saw an opportunity to make sure that missing class didn’t mean missing out on the lessons. Once students had the option of reviewing the lessons at home, the teachers quickly realized the shift opened up additional time in class for more productive, interactive activities than the lectures they’d been giving.

Flipped Classroom – The Movie The Flipped Classroom got a lot of attention in the media during 2013, and this shows no sign of abating as we move into 2014. And why shouldn’t it? When I work with teachers and introduce them to the concept of flipped instruction, most of them quickly realize that it just makes sense. This form of blended learning has a lot to offer the student and teacher, and once educators realize they don’t need to go “all in” all at once to use flipped teaching techniques, they get inspired to try it! I’ve been having some fun learning iMovie lately, inspired by the awesome student created content I saw at the November Teaching and Learning with the iPad Conference.

3 Ways To Relinquish Control Students + Control = Motivation = Teacher – Control? Here’s the thing about control… It’s difficult to share. I actually don’t know if it can be shared. It can definitely be distributed though. When I learned to drive, my instructor had one of those cars that had a brake and a clutch on the passenger’s side as well as the driver’s side. Useful links Here a link (in French) about flipped teaching in different school subjects: Here some sites to prepare lessons: – Scoop.it – Pearltrees – YouTube

The Power of Imagery in Teaching and Writing 808 Flares Twitter 9 Facebook 783 Google+ 10 LinkedIn 6 inShare6 808 Flares × Once upon a time there was a girl who had great admiration for trees, paths, and open spaces. She often went on long, lonely walks accompanied by a willful imagination and a quest for ‘ahas’ m-attacks. Flipped Courses: A Few Concerns about the Rush to Flip I have some concerns about flipping courses. Maybe I’m just hung up on the name—flipping is what we do with pancakes. It’s a quick, fluid motion and looks easy to those of us waiting at the breakfast table. I’m not sure those connotations are good when associated with courses and that leads to what centers my concerns. I keep hearing what sounds to me like “flippant” attitudes about what’s involved. In theory, I couldn’t be more supportive of the idea—it’s learner-centered from the inside out.

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