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6 Ways to Honor the Learning Process in Your Classroom

6 Ways to Honor the Learning Process in Your Classroom
Roughly put, learning is really just a growth in awareness. The transition from not knowing to knowing is part of it, but that's really too simple because it misses all the degrees of knowing and not knowing. One can't ever really, truly understand something any more than a shrub can stay trimmed. There's always growth or decay, changing contexts or conditions. Understanding is the same way. It's fluid. Yes, this sounds silly and esoteric, but think about it. In fact, so little of the learning process is unchanging. Design, engineering, religion, media, literacy, human rights, geography, technology, science -- all of these have changed both in form and connotation in the last decade, with changes in one (i.e., technology) changing how we think of another (i.e., design). And thus changing how students use this skill or understanding. And thus changing how we, as teachers, "teach it." The Implications of Awareness The implications of awareness reach even farther than that, however. 1. 2. 3.

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How Student Centered Is Your Classroom? In the education world, the term student-centered classroom is one we hear a lot. And many educators would agree that when it comes to 21st-century learning, having a student-centered classroom is certainly a best practice. Whether you instruct first grade or university students, take some time to think about where you are with creating a learning space where your students have ample voice, engage frequently with each other, and are given opportunities to make choices. Guiding Questions

A Taxonomy Tree: A Bloom's Revised Taxonomy Graphic A Taxonomy Tree: A Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy Graphic by TeachThought Staff If you’re a TeachThought reader, you know that thought is at the core of our content–curiosity, critical thinking, self-direction, and play among other slivers of learning. This is especially true as it relates to teaching, learning, and technology. At the point where teaching, learning, and thinking overlap sits the concept of a learning taxonomy. And at that the center of that overlap is Bloom’s Taxonomy, certainly the most iconic of the thinking frameworks we use today.

Six Things That Make College Teachers Successful 1. Study the knowledge base of teaching and learning. You have chosen to teach in higher education because you are a subject-matter specialist with a tremendous knowledge of your discipline. As you enter or continue your career, there is another field of knowledge you need to know: teaching and learning. What we know about teaching and learning continues to grow dramatically. It includes developing effective instructional strategies, reaching today’s students, and teaching with technology.

Making Sure They Are Learning Sarah Kaufmann: I think of authentic assessment as my ability to teach each student where they actually are. I'm Sarah Kaufmann. I teach sixth grade humanities at School of the Future. In order to know where they actually are, I have to be able to assess them really specifically and in a variety of ways that are appropriate for that student, so that what I'm doing is every day giving that child an environment where they're challenged, where they feel good about what they're learning and they feel like they're learning. Stacy Goldstein: What's been amazing to watch in Sarah's class as a sixth grade teacher is also, she just is extremely rigorous in what she demands from the kids. And so her class really has high standards. How Engaged Are Students and Teachers in American Schools? By Anya Kamenetz, Hechinger Report Gallup recently released a major report on the State of American Schools. Their data paints a picture of schools performing as a complex ecosystem, with the wellbeing, engagement, and performance of teachers, students, and principals all intertwined. The report combines decades of surveys of 5 million American teachers and principals with the results of the Gallup Student Poll, now billed as the largest survey of American students with 600,000 5th through 12 grade participants, and several large follow-up studies. Gallup’s also drawing on its background developing the Employee Engagement Survey, which has been administered to a total of almost 30 million people in all professions.

Using “Frameworks” to Enhance Teaching and Learning September 17, 2012 By: Patrice W. Hallock, PhD in Teaching and Learning Green School Weekly News - Alternate Education Philosophies This week I wish to share some of the influences that have developed Green School’s approach in learning and teaching. At Green School we do review, adapt and refine ideas from a wide range of sources. Here are seven key pedagogies. Dr. Comprehensive Assessment: An Overview Narrator: They are dueling with robots in Florida, and study microorganisms in New York, designing future schools in Seattle, and racing electric cars in Hawaii. All across the country students are being called upon to show what they know in challenging tests of their abilities. Man: Here we go! The national championship on the line. Narrator: These are the fun tests. Teacher: Today we're going to take SAT I, the reasoning test.

Education Week This post is by Libby Woodfin, a former teacher and school counselor and the director of publications for Expeditionary Learning. It's not as easy as you might think. Teachers have many tools at their disposal that can facilitate deeper learning--long-term projects, hands-on activities, and, often, new technologies. You'll often find find deeper learning in that context, but not always. You also may find deeper learning in the context of a more traditional classroom environment. Research in Critical Thinking The Center conducts advanced research and disseminates information on critical thinking. Each year it sponsors an annual International Conference on Critical Thinking and Educational Reform. It has worked with the College Board, the National Education Association, the U.S. Department of Education, as well as numerous colleges, universities, and school districts to facilitate the implementation of critical thinking instruction focused on intellectual standards. The following three studies demonstrate: the fact that, as a rule, critical thinking is not presently being effectively taught at the high school, college and university level, and yet it is possible to do so.

Teacher Appreciation: Why We Teach All good teaching originates from the motive of generosity. To help others understand history, literature, mathematics or science is the ground upon which all learning stands. Fundamentally, education is the transmission of wisdom from one scholar to another. The Leader Who Serves Indeed, this is what great teachers do every day. Big Thinkers: Howard Gardner on Multiple Intelligences Howard Gardner: We have schools because we hope that someday when children have left schools that they will still be able to use what it is that they've learned. And there is now a massive amount of evidence from all realms of science that unless individuals take a very active role in what it is that they're studying, unless they learn to ask questions, to do things hands-on, to essentially recreate things in their own mind and then transform them as is needed, the ideas just disappear. The student may have a good grade on the exam. We may think that he or she is learning, but a year or two later there's nothing left.

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