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The Dimensions of Colour Figure 2.1. Glossy sphere (billiard ball) under a single direct light source, showing effects of specular and diffuse reflection. Photograph by David Briggs. Light is reflected from most surfaces by two simultaneous processes, known as specular (or surface) reflection and diffuse (or body) reflection. Specular (literally "mirror-like") reflection creates the highlight as its most conspicuous expression (Figure 2.1). On our ball, as on most substances apart from the coloured metals like copper and gold, the specular reflection retains the colour of the (white) light source.

Big Doodle Big sharpie doodle! Big Doodle - sharpie on mat board - 40" x 32" Artwork © Lawrence Yang 2009 my blog | my site | purchase inquiries Tissue.prn: Desktop Printer Technology Used to Lay Down Regenera The same printer technology that sits on your desk could soon be a common fixture in rebuilding human tissue, treating burns by laying down layers of a patients' own skin or even rebuilding whole organs. A team at Wake Forest University has built a "bioprinter" that uses cells instead of ink. It even uses an ordinary, off-the-shelf printhead, connected to test tubes full of different cell types instead of wells full of colored inks. Led by Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Winston–Salem, N.C., the team is working on treating burns. Such wounds can be hard to treat, because in severe cases there might not be enough healthy skin on the patient to harvest or culture for a graft.

How to Draw the Nose Update 09-26-2012 – Above is a video version of this tutorial. For more video tutorials visit Proko.com and subscribe to the newsletter In this tutorial I will go over the structure of the nose and give detailed information about the bridge, ball, and nostrils of the nose. At the end, I will show a step by step of a nose drawing. Drawing Eyes For a video version of this tutorial visit www.proko.com/how-to-draw-eyes-structure This tutorial is a continuation of How to Draw the Head from Any Angle. I will go over the structure of the eye and detailed information on drawing the brow ridge, eyeball, eyelids, eyelashes, iris, cornea, and pupil. The Basic Forms

What is the difference between polmer clay and sculpey 111 clay? - Yahoo!7 Answers . Sculpey III is just one brand (and line) of "polymer clay." It's often the cheapest of the small pre-colored brands polymer clay (at least when Michaels *isn't* having one of their sales --which is right now!). Polymer clays must be heat "cured" at a certain temperature for a certain length of time or they won't harden (they don't harden in the air by "drying" like "air-dry" clays do). "Modeling" clays (the older type primarly used by kids) also won't harden in the air, but if baked it will actually melt. When most people say "Sculpey," thery usually mean Sculpey III which comes in 2 oz bars, but other "Sculpeys" are the original Sculpey (white or terracotta color only, generally comes in 2 lb boxes), SuperSculpey (translucent flesh colored clay, in 1 lb box), or one of the other specialized Sculpeys, like Ultralight or Eraser Clay, etc.

fingerings Growing up in Asia, I have only come across the Chinese finger paintings which uses finger and black ink that the painter draws traditional paintings mostly of flowers, animals or scenery. And now there's Judith Braun who uses her fingers to draw but in a totally new way which she dipped her fingers in charcoal or pastel and mostly her drawings are in abstract forms and bilateral symmetry. Fingerings by Judith Braun ~

Windows To The Soul: Eyeball Closeups This is a series of eyeball closeups taken by Suren Manvelyan. Why anybody would want to take a bunch of freaky macro eyeball pictures is beyond me, but I suspect Suren is trying to steal souls. WHAT THE HELL KIND OF POTIONS ARE YOU MIXING, WIZARD?! Hit the jump for a ton more ookiness. Your beautiful eyes [behance] Thanks to David, who wears dual eyepatches for fear of getting his soul stolen by photographers.

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