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Mycoted

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Realistic Lateral Thinking Puzzles Lateral Thinking Puzzles, unlike most puzzles, are inexact. In a sense, they are a hybrid between puzzles and storytelling. In each puzzle, some clues to a scenario are given, but the clues don't tell the full story. Your job is to fill in the details and complete the story. Obviously, there is usually more than one answer to any given puzzle, but, in general, only one solution is truly satisfying. You can try solving these puzzles on your own -- that's certainly a legitimate way to go about this -- but usually you can have more fun if you involve other people.

The Daily Rituals Of The World's Most Creative People And What You Can Learn From Them The novelist Patricia Highsmith worked in bed surrounded by cigarettes, an ashtray, matches, a mug of coffee, a doughnut and a cup full of sugar. According to Mason Currey, the author of the entertaining and enlightening new book, Daily Rituals: How Artists Work, she also liked to have a stiff drink before she settled down to write, “to reduce her energy levels, which veered toward the manic.” Daily Rituals chronicles the routines of genius-level artists, writers, composers, and philosophers--Beethoven, Kafka, Chuck Close, and John Cheever are among those included. Their quotidian schedules tended to be as regular as they were idiosyncratic.

Creativity techniques Creativity techniques are methods that encourage creative actions, whether in the arts or sciences. They focus on a variety of aspects of creativity, including techniques for idea generation and divergent thinking, methods of re-framing problems, changes in the affective environment and so on. They can be used as part of problem solving, artistic expression, or therapy.

Developing Questions for Critical Thinking “Education must be increasingly concerned about the fullest development of all children and youth, and it will be the responsibility of the schools to seek learning conditions which will enable each individual to reach the highest level of learning possible.” Benjamin Bloom Handbook on Formative and Summative Evaluation of Student Learning Bloom’s original taxonomy (developed in the 1950's) divided the way people learn into three domains: cognitive, affective, and psychomotor. In the 1990's Lorin Anderson, a former student of Bloom revised the original cognitive domain. The original Bloom's taxonomy is still relevant, but under the new revisions the six major categories of the cognitive domain were changed from noun to verb format and some subcategories were reorganized.

100 Websites To See Before You Die (Part 1) Here at Maximum PC, we've always done our fair share of website recommendation articles--including a couple of doozies from the past few years. And of course we're not the only ones who do this sort of article either; it's a proven popular format. But this year, we thought we'd mix things up a little bit. Why Grumpy People Can Be Super Productive When we say that we're "waiting for the right time" to start on something, we tend to mean that we want to feel good about what we're doing--but new research suggests that a pinch of negativity can actually be a creative spark. How so? Creativity, as we know, is both an emotional and intellectual process: Psychologists have found that positive emotions open up your inventory of possible actions--one of the many reasons that it's good to feel good.

Computers and Creativity Since the beginning of the computer revolution people have been asking: Can computers be truly creative? That's a question best left to the philosophers. It probably all depends on what we mean by computer and what we mean by creativity - and, in the end, what we mean by human. Fascinating subjects but beyond the scope of this website.

The Best Resources For Helping Teachers Use Bloom’s Taxonomy In The Classroom Bloom’s Taxonomy is talked about a lot in educational circles. However, if you believe a recent survey of visits to 23,000 U.S. classrooms, the higher-order thinking skills it’s ideally designed to promote doesn’t get much use. And I can understand why. It’s easy to get caught-up in the day-to-day work involved in teaching a class or multiple classes, and it’s easy to fall into the trap of doing the “usual stuff” and not “think out of the box.” I thought it might be useful to share in a “The Best…” list the resources that help me try to use Bloom’s Taxonomy in my classroom.

My Collection of Funny Emails. Send funny emails to your friends! Why didn’t I think of that? You’ll be uttering those words more than once at these ingenious little tips, tricks and ideas that solve everyday problems... some you never knew you had! Hull strawberries easily using a straw. Rubbing a walnut over scratches in your furniture will disguise dings and scrapes.

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