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Mythologies

Mythologies
Coyote and Opossum appear in the stories of a number of tribes. The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Such spiritual stories are deeply based in Nature and are rich with the symbolism of seasons, weather, plants, animals, earth, water, sky and fire. The principle of an all embracing, universal and omniscient Great Spirit, a connection to the Earth, diverse creation narratives and collective memories of ancient ancestors are common. Traditional worship practices are often a part of tribal gatherings with dance, rhythm, songs and trance (e.g. the sun dance). Algonquian (northeastern US, Great Lakes)[edit] Plains Natives[edit] Blackfoot mythology – A North American tribe who currently live in Montana. Muskogean (southern US) and Iroquois (Eastern US)[edit] Alaska and Canada[edit] See also[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mythologies_of_the_indigenous_peoples_of_North_America

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Ten Types of Goblins The term “goblin” can apply to many types of magical creatures around the world. However, the one unifying feature is a sense of evil, or at least mischievousness, embodied in a grotesque or off-putting form with a general link to nighttime or merely dark places. Goblins have been around for a very long time to the point of having a specific term for them in Medieval Latin. The English word “goblin” actually comes from the Greek “kobalos” which means rogue.

Native American Legends (Folklore, Myths, and Traditional Indian Stories) Indigenous languages Native American cultures What's new on our site today! This page is our collection of Native American folktales and traditional stories that can be read online. We have indexed these stories tribe by tribe to make them easier to locate; however, variants on the same native legend are often told by American Indians from different tribes, especially if those tribes are kinfolk or neighbors to each other.

Aztec mythology Mictlantecuhtli (left), god of death, the lord of the Underworld and Quetzalcoatl (right), god of wisdom, life, knowledge, morning star, patron of the winds and light, the lord of the West. Together they symbolize life and death. Aztec mythology is the body or collection of myths of Aztec civilization of Central Mexico.[1] The Aztecs were Nahuatl speaking groups living in central Mexico and much of their mythology is similar to that of other Mesoamerican cultures. According to legend, the various groups who were to become the Aztecs arrived from the north into the Anahuac valley around Lake Texcoco. The location of this valley and lake of destination is clear – it is the heart of modern Mexico City – but little can be known with certainty about the origin of the Aztec. There are different accounts of their origin.

Sex magic Paschal Beverly Randolph[edit] The earliest known practical teachings of sex magic in the Western world come from 19th-century American occultist Paschal Beverly Randolph, under the heading of The Mysteries of Eulis: If a man has an intelligent and loving wife, with whom he is in complete accord, he can work out the problems [of how to achieve magical results] by her aid. They are a radical soul-sexive series of energies...The rite is a prayer in all cases, and the most powerful [that] earthly beings can employ...it is best for both man and wife to act together for the attainment of the mysterious objects sought. Success in any case requires the adjuvancy of a superior woman. THIS IS THE LAW!

Meditation Monday: Accessing Inner Beauty For today’s meditation, I thought I’d offer another excerpt from the “Writing to Connect with the Elves” online class. Access beauty, restore balance of the masculine and feminine energies within you, and release your deepest desires from resistance. “To see this realm – the realm of thought forms, is to see resistance to your desires. It is to see yourself in a mirror; it is to see wounds, to see joy, and forgotten bliss. It takes courage to enter this realm. The Encyclopedia of Arda The Encyclopedia of Arda is a personal project - a tribute to and a celebration of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. The site is evolving into an illustrated hypertext encyclopedia of Tolkien's realms and peoples. It already contains about four thousand entries, and we're constantly adding new entries and expanding existing ones. Inside the encyclopedia

Shasta Secrets « Mt Shasta Spirit ysterious Shasta beckons the world-weary traveler, eager to escape from the world of the mundane into the world of the divine. Even the stark, rolling beauty of the northern California highway, flirting with the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, sharply gives way to the sublime majesty of mighty Shasta’s peak. Upon approaching the scenic beauty of the great mountain and its numerous secondary features, one feels somehow transported to another land, to a magical, former time when life was simpler, and grander. My first experience with Shasta was as a side trip while visiting relatives in northern California one summer. I was expecting to experience the typical day trip: a good day’s hike, some nice scenery, a good meal at a local restaurant, some nice souvenirs to take home, and perhaps some interesting experiences to talk about around the dinner table. After some window shopping in cozy downtown Mount Shasta city, a luxurious hike on Shasta’s

Moai Moai facing inland at Ahu Tongariki, restored by Chilean archaeologist Claudio Cristino in the 1990s Moai i/ˈmoʊ.aɪ/, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people from rock on the Chilean Polynesian island of Easter Island between the years 1250 and 1500.[1] Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter. The Return of the Elder Race & Opening the Gateway of the Fifth Kingdom Nefertiti, reportedly ‘a princess from a foreign country’ became married to Akhenaton. By VICTORIA LEPAGE René Guénon’s assertion, culled from ancient esoteric sources, that in the remote past humanity’s first civilisation arose in the ice-free Arctic zone is not without geological support. According to the well-known researcher J.S.

makeyourownhealth Hello! It’s been a while. It’s springtime now- a time of cleansing, rebirth, and change. I’m feeling positive as my health mission continues. Family tree of the Greek gods Key: The essential Olympians' names are given in bold font. See also List of Greek mythological figures Notes A Primer on Native American Spirituality: It’s History, Influence & Legacy “Benjamin Franklin, Tom Paine, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams, among others, openly acknowledged their debt to Native Americans for the structure of the democracy they crafted. The same revolutionary concepts of government they learned from the Indians were later exported to Europe, where they were carried directly by Thomas Paine.” As American Indians emerged during the past century from the controlling influence of Christian missionaries on the reservations, they have fought to reclaim their religious heritage and to guard it from distortion by the dominant white culture of North America. Some Native Americans have expressed the feeling that their religion is not appropriate for use by outsiders, and that non-Indians have no business participating in Indian rituals such as the sweat lodge and vision quest.

Spirituality is the basis of the Native American culture. The tales and mythical stories inspire themselves from nature: the seasons, the weather, the plants, the animals... Every tribe has its own legends. Nevertheless, they commonly share the same beliefs such as the existence of the Great Spirit. by kissiakovzhou Oct 20

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