background preloader

Rangi and Papa

Rangi and Papa
Papa and Rangi held each other in a tight embrace In Māori mythology the primal couple Rangi and Papa (or Ranginui and Papatuanuku) appear in a creation myth explaining the origin of the world. In some South Island dialects, Rangi is called Raki or Rakinui.[1] Union and separation[edit] Ranginui and Papatuanuku are the primordial parents, the sky father and the earth mother who lie locked together in a tight embrace. They have many children[2] all of which are male, who are forced to live in the cramped darkness between them.[3] These children grow and discuss among themselves what it would be like to live in the light. But his brother Tāne disagrees, suggesting that it is better to push them apart, to let Ranginui be as a stranger to them in the sky above while Papatuanuku will remain below to nurture them. War in heaven and earth[edit] Tāne adorned Ranginui with stars And so the children of Ranginui and Papatuanuku see light and have space to move for the first time. Yearning[edit] B.G.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rangi_and_Papa

Related:  Asian and Oceanic Sky DeitiesSORT: MISC PEARL: IN PROGRESS

Ao (mythology) In Māori mythology, Ao ("daylight") is one of the primal deities who are the unborn forces of nature. Ao is the personification of light and the ordinary world, as opposed to darkness and the underworld. makeyourownhealth Hello! It’s been a while. It’s springtime now- a time of cleansing, rebirth, and change.

Zeus Name The Chariot of Zeus, from an 1879 Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church. The god's name in the nominative is Ζεύς Zeús /zdeús/. It is inflected as follows: vocative: Ζεῦ / Zeû; accusative: Δία / Día; genitive: Διός / Diós; dative: Διί / Dií. Diogenes Laertius quotes Pherecydes of Syros as spelling the name, Ζάς.[10] The earliest attested forms of the name are the Mycenaean Greek 𐀇𐀸, di-we and 𐀇𐀺, di-wo, written in the Linear B syllabic script.[14]

Tane-rore In Maori mythology, Tane-Rore is the personification of shimmering air as he performs a haka for his mother Hine-ruamati. Family[edit] Tama-nui-te-ra had two wives, Hine-takurua and the Summer maid Hine-raumati. 10 Reasons Clay Should Be In Every Mama’s Cupboard By Kresha Faber, Contributing Writer This post contains affiliate links. So let me state for the record that I am officially crackers. I let my kids eat dirt. And not only that, I make sure they eat dirt. Okay, okay – it’s not just any dirt, although I will argue that eating dirt while they play can actually be quite a healthy thing, the dirt to which I am referring is mineral-rich clay. Wākea "Wakea" redirects here. For the frog genus proposed as separate from Mantidactylus, see Mantidactylus. In Hawaiian mythology, Wākea is a god of the sky, the eldest son of Kahiko ("Ancient One"), and lives in Olalowaia. He is the ancestor of the aristocracy (alii) and grandson of Welaahilaninui. The priests and common people come from his brothers, one of whom was called Makuʻu.

Marici (Buddhism) Marici Marici is usually depicted in one of the following ways: She has been depicted with one, three, five or six faces and two, six, eight, ten or twelve arms; three eyes; in her many-faced manifestations one of her faces is that of a sow. The origins of Marici are obscure, however, she appears to be an amalgamation of Brahmanical, Iranian, and non-Aryan[1] antecedents spanning 1500 years. Marici with eight-arms & four faces riding on a boar. Blue-eyed Humans Have A Single, Common Ancestor New research shows that people with blue eyes have a single, common ancestor. A team at the University of Copenhagen have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye colour of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today. What is the genetic mutation "Originally, we all had brown eyes," said Professor Hans Eiberg from the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

Jupiter (mythology) The consuls swore their oath of office in Jupiter's name, and honoured him on the annual feriae of the Capitol in September. To thank him for his help (and to secure his continued support), they offered him a white ox (bos mas) with gilded horns.[10] A similar offering was made by triumphal generals, who surrendered the tokens of their victory at the feet of Jupiter's statue in the Capitol. Some scholars have viewed the triumphator as embodying (or impersonating) Jupiter in the triumphal procession.[11]

Tāwhirimātea In Māori mythology, Tāwhirimātea (or Tāwhiri) is the god of weather, including thunder and lightning, wind, clouds and storms. He is a son of Papatūānuku (earth mother) and Ranginui (sky father). In his anger at his brothers for separating their parents, Tāwhirimātea destroyed the forests of Tāne (god of forests), drove Tangaroa (god of the sea) and his progeny into the sea, pursued Rongo and Haumia-tiketike till they had to take refuge in the bosom of their mother Papa, and only found in Tūmatauenga a worthy opponent and eternal enemy (Tregear 1891:499). To fight his brothers, Tāwhirimātea gathered an army of his children, winds and clouds of different kinds - including Apū-hau ("fierce squall"), Apū-matangi, Ao-nui, Ao-roa, Ao-pōuri, Ao-pōtango, Ao-whētuma, Ao-whekere, Ao-kāhiwahiwa, Ao-kānapanapa, Ao-pākinakina, Ao-pakarea, and Ao-tākawe (Grey 1971). Other children of Tāwhirimātea are the various kinds of rain, mists and fog. References[edit]

Related: