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100 Diagrams That Changed the World

100 Diagrams That Changed the World
Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the Earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even concretize abstract concepts like consciousness and love. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World (public library) by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web. It appears that no great diagram is solely authored by its creator. Most of those described here were the culmination of centuries of accumulated knowledge. Most arose from collaboration (and oftentimes in competition) with others. Christianson offers a definition:

https://www.brainpickings.org/2012/12/21/100-diagrams-that-changed-the-world/

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10 Lame Documents that Would Be Better as Infographics Infographics, it seems, have taken the media by storm. Because they are visually attractive, eye-catching, accessible, fun, and–if done well–quickly and effectively informative, people are drawn to them. And businesses have caught wind of this. We see infographics in magazines, on blogs, and even on corporate “About Us” pages in order to sell news, ideas, and products. But what if infographics were used for more “common” documents–the stuff we use day-to-day? Would they make our lives easier?

The Music of the Spheres, or the Metaphysics of Music by Robert Kelly “[In] sound itself, there is a readiness to be ordered by the spirit and this is seen at its most sublime in music.” —Max Picard Despite the popular Romantic conception of creative artists as inspired madmen, composers are not idiots savants, distilling their musical inspiration from the ether. Rather, in their creative work they respond and give voice to certain metaphysical vi- sions. Most composers speak explicitly in philosophical terms about the nature of the reality that they try to reflect. When the forms of musical expression change radically, it is always because the underlying metaphysical grasp of reality has changed as well.

Lost Paris: Documenting the disappearance of a Medieval City If you can’t make it to Paris (or time travel), the next best thing is to head to a very interesting show of pictures currently being held at the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris is a collection of photographs of a Paris lost, moments before its disappearance. Before it became the city of light, before the Eiffel Tower became its unmistakable symbol, photographer Charles Marville was commissioned to document the transition from medieval Paris, a city that would be all but destroyed to make way for a modern, symmetric and more efficient Paris. Under the order of Napoleon III, General Haussmann was in charge of tearing up streets and razing entire neighbourhoods.

David Byrne’s Hand-Drawn Pencil Diagrams of the Human Condition by Maria Popova “Science’s job is to map our ignorance.” David Byrne may have authored both one of last year’s best albums and best music books, but he is also one of the sharpest thinkers of our time and a kind of visual philosopher. About a decade ago, Byrne began making “mental maps of imaginary territory” in a little notebook based on self-directed instructions to draw anything from a Venn diagram about relationships to an evolutionary tree of pleasure — part Wendy MacNaughton, part Julian Hibbard, yet wholly unlike anything else. In 2006, Byrne released Arboretum (UK; public library), a collection of these thoughtful, funny, cynical, poetic, and altogether brilliant pencil sketches — some very abstract, some very concrete — drawn in the style of evolutionary diagrams and mapping everything from the roots of philosophy to the tangles of romantic destiny to the ecosystem of the performing arts. Möbius Structure of Relationships

We Should Be Teaching Infographics A couple decades ago or so USA Today did something monumental in the world of news: they made information much more visual. In an effort to boost readership (and sales) they did something that, at the time, seemed entirely radical: increase the size of the images to make the news much more picture-heavy. Reduce textual content, in other words, and increase visualization. Philographics — Genis Carreras Philographics Philographics is a series of posters that explain big ideas in simple shapes. They are the result of combining the world of philosophy with graphic design. You can get the entire set of 95 designs as a book or a selection of them as posters. Cart - 0 items

Samhain Samhain (pronounced /ˈsɑːwɪn/ SAH-win or /ˈsaʊ.ɪn/ SOW-in)[1] is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the "darker half" of the year. It is celebrated from sunset on 31 October to sunset on 1 November, which is nearly halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice. Along with Imbolc, Beltane and Lughnasadh it makes up the four Gaelic seasonal festivals. It was observed in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Kindred festivals were held at the same time of year in other Celtic lands; for example the Brythonic Calan Gaeaf (in Wales), Kalan Gwav (in Cornwall) and Kalan Goañv (in Brittany). Samhain is mentioned in some of the earliest Irish literature and is known to have pre-Christian roots.

The Best Data Visualization Projects of 2014 It's always tough to pick my favorite visualization projects. I mean, it's a challenge to pick and rank your favorite anything really. So much depends on what you feel like at the time, and there's a lot of good work out there. Nevertheless, I gave it a go. These are my favorites for the year, roughly in order of favorite on down and based on use of data, design, and being useful. Mostly though, my picks are based on gut. A Tube map of the London Underground that's far more useful than the 'official' one - UK - News The new map, by a user called Sameboat, has been praised for being clearer than the old, 80-year old template. Unlike in the official version, different branches of the fast-expanding London Overground Network are now in different colours, handy interchanges are highlighted and the correct geographical relationship between the two stations in Bethnal Green, east London, is shown. Planned line extensions are also highlighted, meaning that the map is more likely to be 'future proof' compared to the version used by Transport for London.

Suhrawardi First published Wed Dec 26, 2007; substantive revision Wed Apr 4, 2012 Trained in Avicennan Peripateticism, Shihab al-Din al-Suhrawardi (1154–1191) became the founder of an Illuminationist (ishraqi) philosophical tradition in the Islamic East. Since none of his works were translated into Latin, he remained unknown in the West; but from the 13th century onwards, his works were studied in a number of philosophical circles in the Islamic East. In the mid-20th century, Henry Corbin worked relentlessly to edit and study his writings, which led to renewed interest in Suhrawardi's works and thought, especially in the later part of the 20th century. Suhrawardi provided an original Platonic criticism of the dominant Avicennan Peripateticism of the time in the fields of logic, epistemology, psychology, and metaphysics, while simultaneously elaborating his own epistemological (logic and psychology) and metaphysical (ontology and cosmology) Illuminationist theories. 1.

Scientists Have Found That Memories Can Be Passed Down Through Generations In... New research from Emory University School of Medicine, in Atlanta, has shown that it is possible for some information to be inherited biologically through chemical changes that occur in DNA. During the tests they learned that that mice can pass on learned information about traumatic or stressful experiences – in this case a fear of the smell of cherry blossom – to subsequent generations. According to the Telegraph, Dr Brian Dias, from the department of psychiatry at Emory University, said: ”From a translational perspective, our results allow us to appreciate how the experiences of a parent, before even conceiving offspring, markedly influence both structure and function in the nervous system of subsequent generations. “Such a phenomenon may contribute to the etiology and potential intergenerational transmission of risk for neuropsychiatric disorders such as phobias, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder.” Sources: UTAOT

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