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History of Philosophy without any gaps

History of Philosophy without any gaps

http://www.historyofphilosophy.net/

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100 Diagrams That Changed the World Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the Earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even concretize abstract concepts like consciousness and love. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World (public library) by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web. It appears that no great diagram is solely authored by its creator. Most of those described here were the culmination of centuries of accumulated knowledge. Most arose from collaboration (and oftentimes in competition) with others. Christianson offers a definition:

Guide to Philosophy on the Internet (Suber) Welcome to my collection of online philosophy resources. If you are stuck in a frame, click here to escape. If you are a frequent visitor, press reload or refresh on occasion to be sure that you are viewing the most recent version of the page, not the version cached on your hard drive from your last visit. I've marked recommended sites with a red star

Israel's Time To Know Aims To Revolutionize The Classroom This is the story of Time To Know, an enigmatic Israeli startup that has somehow managed to remain under the radar of Israel’s tightly knit startup scene. What makes this feat wondrous is not only because of the daunting challenge the company has chosen to meet, but that it has quietly ramped to 350 employees and no less than $60M in funding—all without attracting attention. Time To Know is the realization of a single man’s vision to un-root teaching methodologies from their 19th century origins and thrust them into the 21st century. The entrepreneur is Shmuel Meitar, co-founder of Israeli hi-tech posterchild Amdocs. To appreciate Meitar’s commitment, consider this: He is TimeToKnow’s sole investor.

100 Best Classical Recordings Beneath its unruffled, Mediterranean surface, Mozart’s sublime yet cruel comedy comes to life in Bernard Haitink’s interpretation from Glyndebourne, with a cast including Carol Vaness and Claudio Desderi. 3 Mozart Die Zauberflöte (conductor Otto Klemperer) EMI £17.60, RRP £17.99 The dialogue may be cut, but no CD collection should be without Mozart’s 'opera for everybody’ or a cast that includes Lucia Popp’s Queen of the Night and Nicolai Gedda’s Tamino. 4 Puccini Tosca (conductor Victor de Sabata) EMI £17.60, RRP £17.99

Logic and Ontology 1. Introduction Both logic and ontology are important areas of philosophy covering large, diverse, and active research projects. These two areas overlap from time to time and problems or questions arise that concern both. The Music of the Spheres, or the Metaphysics of Music by Robert Kelly “[In] sound itself, there is a readiness to be ordered by the spirit and this is seen at its most sublime in music.” —Max Picard Despite the popular Romantic conception of creative artists as inspired madmen, composers are not idiots savants, distilling their musical inspiration from the ether. Rather, in their creative work they respond and give voice to certain metaphysical vi- sions. Most composers speak explicitly in philosophical terms about the nature of the reality that they try to reflect. When the forms of musical expression change radically, it is always because the underlying metaphysical grasp of reality has changed as well.

Wittgenstein’s Ethics and the Value of the Mystical « Douglas Duhaime Although Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) famously declared that “ethics cannot be put into words,” ethical issues continue to pose perennial problems for philosophy, and Wittgenstein’s writings on ethics continue to earn philosophy’s interest and accolades (2005 p.183). In what follows, I outline Wittgenstein’s writings on ethics and briefly discuss the value his approach lends to the mystical objects and experiences in life. In his “Lecture on Ethics” (1929), Wittgenstein informs us that he means many things by the word “ethics,” including: the enquiry into what is good, valuable, or important; the enquiry into the meaning of life; the inquiry into that which makes life worth living; and the enquiry into the right way of living (P.5).

Cooperative Catalyst In Wounded by School, Kirsten Olson validates the experiences we have all had. Whether that’s the formation of a self-image that we are incapable or stupid, reflecting the narrow and inflexible curriculum of public schools; or the dulling of our senses and joy for learning as we do rote memorization in order to regurgitate on a scan-tron sheet; or being afraid of not being correct and of taking chances; we all know the wounds very well. Regarding the book, let me say it’s worth reading, I am not going to provide a recap or highlights, but rather discuss where it has led me. My wound described in my graduate school application as “my passion for learning persists in spite of my formal education,” is what fueled me to become involved in education again. My graduate work at Goddard College has healed many of the fractures I had, and empowers me to bring forth learning through wholeness with others. Luckily, I am resilient.

Galileo Galilei 1. Brief Biography Galileo was born on February 15, 1564 in Pisa. By the time he died on January 8, 1642 (but see problems with the date, Machamer 1998, pp. 24–5) he was as famous as any person in Europe. Descartes, Rene [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy] René Descartes is often credited with being the “Father of Modern Philosophy.” This title is justified due both to his break with the traditional Scholastic-Aristotelian philosophy prevalent at his time and to his development and promotion of the new, mechanistic sciences. His fundamental break with Scholastic philosophy was twofold. First, Descartes thought that the Scholastics’ method was prone to doubt given their reliance on sensation as the source for all knowledge. Second, he wanted to replace their final causal model of scientific explanation with the more modern, mechanistic model. Descartes attempted to address the former issue via his method of doubt.

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