background preloader

The First Zombie-Proof House

The First Zombie-Proof House
Somehow, ritual drunk-conversation concerning team captains for the apocalypse has become a major part of the lives of 20-somethings. Having been matured in the Grandaddy-crowned masterpiece film (put “A.M. 180” on and forget that you have a job) 28 Days Later and the best-selling Zombie Survival Guide, we’re all a little too ready to deal with the 2012 zombie apocalypse of our dreams. “The Safe House,” designed by KWK Promes, starts to get eerily close to something I could work with, if say 200 bludgeoned members of the undead army came over to eat their way into borrowing some sugar. “The most essential item for our clients was acquiring the feeling of maximum security,” begins the designers’ website in the summary of the structure. Who wouldn’t feel safe in a concrete rectangle that folds in upon itself to become completely sealed? Even the windows are covered with a slab of concrete when the structure is on nap time.

http://all-that-is-interesting.com/post/4956385434/the-first-zombie-proof-house

Related:  Modern UndergroundSurvivalArchitecture / Buildingshome

Subtle Subterranean House is Underground & Understated Many underground homes have relatively extreme designs, either due to ultra-wealthy clients who give their architects a (literal or at least metaphorical) blank check to design a luxury dream house, or because of existing conditions (for instance; retrofitting an old military base and/or missile silo to be a new home). This modest alternative shows the power of simplicity in a nonetheless remarkable minimalist home in the ground. BCHO Architects started by carving a basic box-shaped void into the earth, holding a place for the space with likewise simple retaining walls of rough and raw board-formed concrete. A side stairway starts the sequence of movement down into this space, slowly taking into increasingly more enclosed areas. Along the way, the naturalistic texture of this bounding structure is reprised in real-dirt exterior courtyard floors, rammed-earth walls outside and natural-finish wooden furniture inside.

Best places in the U.S. to survive the apocalypse: Silohome Interested in uplifting stories on the natural world, sustainable communities, simple food, and new thinking on how to live well? Please enter a valid email address and try again! No thanks Thatched houses in England Thatching is the craft of building a roof with dry vegetation such as straw, water reed, sedge, rushes and heather, layering the vegetation so as to shed water away from the inner roof. It is a very old roofing method and has been used in both tropical and temperate climates. Thatch is still employed by builders in developing countries, usually with low-cost, local vegetation. By contrast in some developed countries it is now the choice of affluent people who desire a rustic look for their home or who have purchased an originally thatched abode.

Secret Underground Passage Connects Barn to Hidden Home You might remember the last time we covered this gorgeous subterranean inside out abode high up in the Swiss Alps, but before it was available for rent … and fully revealed with an ingenious secret entrance passage. No one would suspect this old neighboring stone-and-wood barn structure would provide the concealed entry such a cool and contemporary home set back from the road, half-hidden in a hollowed-out crater on the hill. Plans, sections and 3D diagrams from the designers show how the core structure is tucked into the hillside, while an earth-carved tunnel connects to the main understated entryway.

How to build a Taser for free! Now this is going to be a fairly dangerous part, open up the camera and get the circuit out safely without getting shocked by the capacitor... (The capacitor in the camera is a large black cylinder thing, it is used for making flashes for the camera, but now we are going to use it to shock people!) First, pry open the camera's case apart with a flat-head screwdriver or just use your hands if you like, but you are more likely to get shocked by the capacitor. After you taken the camera's case off, discharge the capacitor with a insulated screw driver, and you may get a big loud spark, and after that, the capacitor is discharged... (Use a screwdriver you hate so much, because a fully charged capacitor will leave a scar on the metal part of the screwdriver!)

Underground Home Design: How to Build & Bury a House Living underground sounds disturbing – cavernous designs, claustrophobic images of cramped quarters and fuzzy pictures with low light levels come quickly to mind. A well-planned underground home, however, can be designed precisely around these problems to have all of the advantages of a cozy and private above-ground house as well as the sustainable and structural benefits of an fully-enclosed living space – entirely under the surface of the Earth. William Lishman sums up the design advantages nicely: “Why build underground?

Survive The Zombie Apocalypse Well here we are—2012. End of the world time. Sucks, doesn’t it? The Abandoned Palace At 5 Beekman Street Update 9/11/2013 – Been meaning to update for a while. 5 Beekman is NO LONGER AVAILABLE FOR FILMING, EVENTS, OR ANY OTHER RENTAL PURPOSE due to ongoing construction. 5 Beekman Street has a secret. You’ve probably passed it a million times in your travels through downtown Manhattan. Certainly anyone who has ever visited J&R Row or hit the Starbucks on the opposite corner for a post-Brooklyn-Bridge-walk bathroom break has noticed its twin towers, and perhaps wondered how much its wealthy tenants pay to live behind its beautiful brick and terra-cotta facade.

Zombie Proof House: Compare to the old school nuke silos. by sgtwidget Jun 28

Related:  ExteriorStrange and bizarre pagesArch+Interior+Designeye candyGeeky / Randomcarpe_digiteArchitecture IISleak, Efficient Architecture and DesignMiscellaneousbbiresZombies :PSurvival RetreatsFunnyDesignvickyskaggsanthonyday313funny stuff