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U.S. Army Survival Manual FM 21-76 - EQUIPPED TO SURVIVE (tm)

U.S. Army Survival Manual FM 21-76 - EQUIPPED TO SURVIVE (tm)
Related:  SURVIVALSurvivalism

Survival skills Survival skills are techniques a person may use in a dangerous situation (e.g. natural disasters) to save themselves or others. These techniques are meant to provide basic necessities for human life: water, food, shelter, habitat, the ability to think straight, to signal for help, to navigate safely, to avoid unpleasant interactions with animals and plants, and cure any present injuries. Survival studies have shown that those who adapt successfully in a stress situation share some some common attributes which set them apart from those who don't. First aid[edit] First aid (wilderness first aid in particular) can help a person survive and function with injuries and illnesses that would otherwise kill or incapacitate him/her. The survivor may need to apply the contents of a first aid kit or, if possessing the required knowledge, naturally occurring medicinal plants, immobilize injured limbs, or even transport incapacitated comrades. Shelter[edit] Fire[edit] Water[edit] Food[edit] [edit] Media

Did you know pine trees can be used as food, medicine and survival equipment? (NaturalNews) The pine is one of the most useful trees on the planet, providing food, shelter, medicine and fuel. Knowing how to utilize this versatile resource could someday be the key to your very survival if you find yourself alone in the wilderness. There are many species in the pine family (or genus Pinus), and they can be found virtually everywhere in the world. Here are just a few of the many uses for pine trees (or conifers): Food: Many types of pine needles can be used to make a tea rich in vitamin C. It's important to note that some pine needles are poisonous -- be sure to avoid consuming the needles from the Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria heterophylla), the Yew (Taxus) and the Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa -- also known as Western Yellow Pine, Bull Pine and Blackjack Pine). Pine nuts from all varieties of pine are edible, although some are small and not typically harvested. Inner pine bark and pine resin are edible; male pine cones and their pollen can also be eaten. Medicine:

Stealth Survival Preparedness We're working hard to finish up our new marketplace, where you'll be able to find all of your preparedness, homesteading and food storage needs. The market will feature organic foods, preparedness supplies and unique solutions from local farmers and small businesses from around the country. CODY LUNDIN: outdoor survival,  primitive living skills, and urban preparedness courses Bacteria Removed From Water With Simple Pine Tree Filter Say MIT Researchers MIT group shows xylem tissue in sapwood can filter bacteria from contaminated water. If you’ve run out of drinking water during a lakeside camping trip, there’s a simple solution: Break off a branch from the nearest pine tree, peel away the bark, and slowly pour lake water through the stick. The improvised filter should trap any bacteria, producing fresh, uncontaminated water. A false-color electron microscope image showing E. coli bacteria (green) trapped over xylem pit membranes (red and blue) in the sapwood after filtration. Researchers design a simple filter by peeling the bark off a small section of white pine, then inserting and securing it within plastic tubing. Image courtesy of the researchers “Today’s filtration membranes have nanoscale pores that are not something you can manufacture in a garage very easily,” Karnik says. Tapping the flow of sap Sapwood may offer a low-cost, small-scale alternative. Seeing red Picking the right plant This research was supported by the James H.

BASIC LIST OF SUGGESTED ITEMS FOR LONG TERM SURVIVAL Some people are saying we should prepare for at least 7 days, but the way things go after a hurricane, tornado, floods, loss of electricity and the fact that these disasters will continue and perhaps even get worse in coming years according to trends, one week is not enough. Some have said 7 years, but that seems too long so do what you can. Be sure to use the older stocked goods first and replace them with new. Otherwise you will end up with all old food you might not even want to eat. Always check canned tomatoes for spoilage, as even in the can they can spoil. Most other foods last a long time. 1. Homeland Security recommends 7 days for survival, but in recent years, some people don't have electricity or heat for up to 3 weeks, so to be really safe - plan for at least 3 weeks. 2. Note: I have received arguments that boiling for longer than 5 minutes will just waste good water, but 15 minutes is safer to kill Cryptospiridium. 3. Wheat - 300 lbs. Rice - 100 lbs. Honey or Sugar - 60 lbs.

38 Survival Downloads and Handbooks – Pioneering, SHTF, Engineering, Urban Gardening, Defense, and More Posted on Aug 16, 2013 in Emergency Preparedness & Survival, Featured Articles, Urban Gardening, Farming & Homesteading Kevin Hayden – TruthisTreason.net If you find this material helpful, please consider donating $1 or $2 to the website! Field Manuals & Military Handbooks (.pdf Format) *New* > Internment and Resettlement Operations FM 3-39.40 Psychological Operations (PsyOps) AFDD 2-5-3 CBR Shelters ETL 1110-3-498 Map Reading & Navigation FM 3-25-26 Terrain, Maps, and Direction *New* > Aircraft Recognition FM44.80 Nuclear, Biological & Chemical (NBC) Field Handbook FM 3-7 Nuclear, Biological & Chemical (NBC) Protection FM 34 Military Chemical & Biological Agents and Compounds FM 3-9 Counterinsurgency Operations FMI 3-07.22 Updated: Counter Insurgency Tactics FM3.24.2 Survival, Evasion, Resistance, & Escape (SERE) AR350-30 US Army Ranger Handbook *New* > Special Operations – Using Pack Animals FM3.05.213 *New* > Special Operations – Caching Techniques TC.3129A Expeditionary Maneuver Warware Fishing Knots

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