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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world
Maps seemed to be everywhere in 2013, a trend I like to think we encouraged along with August's 40 maps that explain the world. Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. You might consider this, then, a collection of maps meant to inspire your inner map nerd. I've searched far and wide for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not, with a careful eye for sourcing and detail. I've included a link for more information on just about every one. Enjoy. 1. Data source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, World Bank. Those dots represent people: the brighter the dot, the more people. 2. Click to enlarge. Human beings first left Africa about 60,000 years ago in a series of waves that peopled the globe. 3. (Wikimedia commons) The Mongol conquests are difficult to fathom. 4. Click to enlarge. This map shows the Spanish and Portuguese empires at their height. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2014/01/13/40-more-maps-that-explain-the-world/

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40 maps that explain the world Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable. A majority are original to this blog, with others from a variety of sources. I've included a link for further reading on close to every one. [Additional read: How Ukraine became Ukraine and 40 more maps that explain the world]

Cartographies of Time: A Visual History of the Timeline by Maria Popova A chronology of one of our most inescapable metaphors, or what Macbeth has to do with Galileo. I was recently asked to select my all-time favorite books for the lovely Ideal Bookshelf project by The Paris Review’s Thessaly la Force and artist Jane Mount. Despite the near-impossible task of shrinking my boundless bibliophilia to a modest list of dozen or so titles, I was eventually able to do it, and the selection included Cartographies of Time: A History of the Timeline (public library | IndieBound) by Daniel Rosenberg and Anthony Grafton — among both my 7 favorite books on maps and my 7 favorite books on time, this lavish collection of illustrated timelines traces the history of graphic representations of time in Europe and the United States from 1450 to the present, featuring everything from medieval manuscripts to websites to a chronological board game developed by Mark Twain. The first chapter, Time in Print, begins with a context for these images: Donating = Loving

20 Places to Educate Yourself Online for Free It seems like these days you can learn just about anything online for free, but of course some of that information is better than others. The good news is there are plenty of reputable places to educate yourself online for free, and here’s a good 20 of them to get you started. 1. Coursera 40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and info graphics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new.

Understanding the Iran-Contra Affairs Welcome to “Understanding the Iran-Contra Affairs,” the only comprehensive website on the famous Reagan-era government scandal, which stemmed from the U.S. government’s policies toward two seemingly unrelated countries, Nicaragua and Iran. Despite stated and repeated denials to Congress and to the public, Reagan Administration officials supported the militant contra rebels in Nicaragua and sold arms to a hostile Iranian government. These events have led to questions about the appropriateness of covert operations, congressional oversight, and even the presidential power to pardon. “Understanding the Iran-Contra Affairs” provides information about the rise of the contra rebels in Nicaragua and about the Iranian Revolution, as well as the U.S. responses to both. Moreover, the website details the media’s discovery and later press coverage of the Affairs, and the subsequent televised congressional hearings. This website was built to serve as an effective teaching, as well as learning, tool.

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. 40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. A few are important to know, some interpret and display data in a beautiful or creative way, and a few may even make you chuckle or shake your head. If you enjoy this collection of maps, the Sifter highly recommends the r/MapPorn sub reddit. You should also check out ChartsBin.com.

Bruce Springsteen 2013-07-11 Rock in Roma, Rome, Italy Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band hits the Rock in Roma Festival in Rome, Italy Brucetapes “Wrecking Ball Tour Blog” shares all the concert details from this Bruce Springsteen show including, articles, set list, videos, reviews, photos, and more. If I’m missing anything, feel free to contact me. Concert setlist doesn’t get updated in real-time. See the discussion/fan forums list at the bottom of this blog post for places where you can follow the setlist in “real-time”. Ticket & Poster: The map that saved the London Underground 9 January 2014Last updated at 20:10 ET By Emma Jane Kirby BBC News Continue reading the main story You must have JavaScript enabled to view this content. A zoomable version of this map is available on the desktop site Explore the 1914 Wonderground Underground map

How myths and tabloids feed on anomalies in science UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH: What do we actually mean by research and how does it help inform our understanding of things? What if research throws up a result that calls for a new way of thinking? How do we handle that? There are many misconceptions about science, including how science advances. These maps show where the world’s youngest and oldest people live What can the median age of a country tell you about its future? Turns out, quite a bit. Using data from the CIA Factbook, we’ve created the graphics below to show you the median age of every country in the world. There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before. Some believe that this "youth bulge" helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment. Writing for the Guardian last year, John Podesta, director of the progressive Center for American Progress, warned that youth unemployment is a “global time bomb,” as long as today’s millennials remain “hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.”

Heritage Route The son of Charlemagne, Louis the Pious, and his successors, the rulers of Francia Media, visited Nijmegen regularly. The Frankish rulers had no fixed capital and travelled continuously from palace to palace. In this way they enforced respect for the royal rights and controlled the local rulers to see if they were still loyal to them. If necessary the palaces were also used as a military base. Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Nijmegen was important to the Frankish rulers and the royal supervision on Nijmegen and the region was firm. The Breathing Exercise That Can Help You Fall Asleep in a Minute – RealClearLife Americans are struggling with sleep. A recent study showed that the average sleep duration has decreased one-and-a-half to two hours over the last 50 years. Some have difficulty staying asleep, while others just can’t drift off in the first place.

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