background preloader

Flashback: Woven Map Basket

Flashback: Woven Map Basket
Maps can be amazing design elements, with all their intricately drawn lines and minute details. But what do you do with a regular paper map that is starting to fall apart from use? In CRAFT Volume 05, crafter Jane Patrick suggested we weave maps into baskets, a fun and interesting way to reuse castoffs and weave a little memory into a functional item. Check out her full tutorial here and pick up a back issue of CRAFT Volume 05, the Paper issue, in the Maker Shed.Woven Memory Basket Weave your vacation road maps into an attractive souvenir. By Jane Patrick Think of basketry as three-dimensional weaving. If you ever wove paper as a child, that’s the basis for this plaited basket. Materials 2-3 large road maps Contrasting string or thread Clothespins Cutting mat Rotary cutter Awl or tapestry needle Scissors Small tweezers White glue (optional) to further stiffen the basket Directions Step 1: Prepare the strips. Fold each strip in half lengthwise. You’ve now woven a diamond.

http://makezine.com/2010/02/02/flashback_woven_map_basket/

woven pin board {tutorial} The other day I found a large {3 ft x 4 ft} cork board at the thrift store. I figured I could always use another pin board and the price was right, so I brought it home. I was thinking I would cover it with linen like this one from potterybarn: But then while perusing some of my favorite blogs, I came across this photo at Grace Happens: recycle project no. 7 - magazine bowl This project took me so much longer than I thought it would. I may not be finished yet (I'll explain in a minute) but I want to move on to other ideas so I decided to post about it now. I certainly didn't reinvent the wheel with this one but it was something fun and super easy to make. DIY Solar Lamp: Make Your Own Eco-Friendly Sun Jars The principle is simple and seductively clever: solar lights that store energy during the day and release light at night. These can be purchased ready-made in a variety of colors (yellow, blue and red) but they can also be built at home. A simple, less-technical approach involves buying a conventional solar-powered yard lamp and then essentially harvesting it for key pieces to put in a jar. This is simply a way of taking an existing solar lamp design and appropriating its parts to make something more attractive for display around a house or home. A more electronically-savvy individual can take the more complex route and built a solar lamp from the ground up using small solar panels – though the aesthetic result may not be as impressive. Whatever route you choose to go, these are fun and sustainable gadgets that make it easy to go green, automate the process of turning on lights at night and can add some color to your porch, patio, garden or windowsill.

Paper flower tutorial I thought some of you would enjoy a quick tutorial on how to make those little paper flowers I used as part of my table setting a couple weeks ago. The credit for these go to Martha Stewart (I saw this idea nearly 10 years ago in her magazine, but haven't been able to find it on her website). So here I go.. Step 1: Draw a spiral on a 4x4" square sheet of paper Step 2: Cut out spiral along lines you have drawn Step 3: Begin rolling up the spiral from the outside

 jones design company A few weeks ago I spent some time with two of my oldest friends {not old as in age, but old as in I’ve known them for a long, long time}. Both mentioned that they had their burlap wreaths up and that they wanted something a little springier for their front doors. So Lindsay & Erin, this one is for you … Here is what you’ll need: :: wreath form {mine is 10 inches, but you could definitely go larger} Paper Flowers – Anyone Can Do That Japanese Kusudama, this tutorial is featured on Craftuts Anyone can do that, I assure you. The proof: I can, just take a quick look at my result below. And, believe me, I am neither meticulous nor particularly patient. Make a Perpetual Button Calendar for 2011 (and Beyond) By Diane Gilleland I know calendars (and clocks and address books) are quickly becoming computer-centric tools, but I like the old-school charm of this desk calendar. Make it once, and you can use it forever – just move the numbers to their correct location each month, and change the nameplate! Materials Picture frame, 11″x14″ or 16″x20″, see belowSheet of foam board or 1/2″-thick corkRuler Craft knife Piece of woven fabric, about 24″x30″ Spray adhesive Masking tape Scissors 42 large buttons, 3/4″ to 1″ in diameter 42 flat-head thumb tacks 5 sheets card stock, for numbers and nameplatesDownloadable name/number template 3/4″ circle punch, optional E-6000, or similarly strong glue Water-soluble fabric marker Fine-point Sharpie 2 squares of wool or acrylic felt 1 sheet of Friendly Felt, or lightweight chipboard Sewing machine and thread 2 sets Velcro dots plus 22 “loop” style dots (the softer half of a Velcro pair)Greeting card envelope

1000 Paper Cranes Backdrop A few weeks ago I introduced you to one of my lovely Brides Laura who was new to the Diary of a Boho Bride feature. You can read all about Laura’s wedding plans HERE . In Laura’s’ introduction I explained that she is a BIG fan of the old DIY and after a few emails and a few sneaky pictures of stuff she had already created, it was clear that she was an even bigger fan of DIY than I first thought.

Related: