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Origami Fiery Dragon instructions ( Kade Chan)

Origami Fiery Dragon instructions ( Kade Chan)
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Dragón fácil | Flickr: Intercambio de fotos Origami Dragon - Origami Dragon The Art of Flipping the Switch By Alli McKee A Goal: as specific to you as your DNA and one of the most powerful, driving forces behind our actions. “First I take the time out, then I put the time in.” -Fabolous What’s your current ambition? Focus. There is a primal transition that takes place in all athletes and competitors as they embark on a season of goals, performance and competition. Nature versus Nurture Is it a genetic lottery or a trained skill? Regardless, progress does not come easy - not for the newbie, nor the elite. The veteran has a different road ahead, yet despite his or her experience, not exactly easier. Many Performers, One Switch. A bodybuilder, a figure competitor, an NFL player, an Olympic athlete, a power lifter, a mixed martial artist, a triathlete... The preparation for a season, performance or body composition can be quite isolating. It Takes a Village As you begin to dial in, you must also establish your support systems - coaches, medical experts, friends, family, etc. Ready, Set, Go

Dosis Diaria de Origami Paper Perfect On February 4, 2014, Robert Lang joined Joshua Foer onstage at the Institute Library in New Haven, Connecticut, as part of the ongoing series “Amateur Hour,” in which various tinkerers, zealots, and collectors discuss their obsessions. Lang is recognized as one of the pioneers of the marriage of origami with mathematics and technology. He is the author of numerous books, including Folding Paper: The Infinite Possibilities of Origami, coauthored with Meher McArthur. The conversation that follows was recorded live and has been edited for brevity and meaning. Joshua Foer: I want to start by asking you about how you made a name for yourself in the field of origami. As I understand, it all started with a single work you completed in 1987. Yes, the cuckoo clock. Just so we’re all clear about the terms here: That was folded with one uncut sheet of paper—​no glue? No glue. How big was the paper? A one-​by-​ten-​foot rectangle. How long did it take you to fold? Sure. So what are we looking at? Yes.

Videos I am often asked if I would produce video instructions for my origami designs. I haven't done any myself (I've focused my efforts on my books); fortunately, there are some talented videographers out there who have made authorized videos demonstrating my designs and/or presenting folding instructions. A selection of such YouTube videos is presented below. If you are interested in uploading instructional videos of my work, please contact me. (For non-traditional figures, one must obtain permission from the artist to post origami videos; see here for details.) Below is a list of available videos provided courtesy of YouTube (and their respective videographers). Sparrow Videographer: Indianapolis Museum of Art Level: Simple Duck Swallow Turtle Scorpion (time lapse) Scorpion (instructions) Valentine Atlantic Purple Sea Urchin Black Forest Cuckoo Clock (time lapse) Baby

Magazine - Article Over a muggy June weekend, more than 600 paper-folding enthusiasts from around the globe are gathered in New York for the annual Origami USA conference. The late-'50s-era classrooms at the Fashion Institute of Technology in Chelsea, where the conference is being held, are a study in beige, from the linoleum to the walls to the dressmakers' mannequins kibitzing in a corner. In one, 20 students ranging in age from 9 to mid-60s wait eagerly, packs of brightly colored paper spread out before them on the long, narrow tables. "This could have been a killer insect class," he says drolly. Lang, MS '83, has certainly folded his share of creepy crawlies—a scorpion with stinger poised to strike, a Japanese "samurai helmet" beetle with formidable forked horn, even a pair of mating praying mantises—each from a single sheet of paper. Prior to about the 1980s, origami arthropod designs were thought to be all but impossible. He began to see connections between origami and math.

DIY: Gift Bags made from Newspaper « alicecorrine Gift bags made from newspaper is a great idea for birthday parties or weddings! We saw this on a site that was we think was in Vietnamese?? Anywho -here’s our best try at translation along with the photo tutorial. Supplies: Glue, Scissors, Paper Doiles, Newspapers, and Wire Ribbon Step 1: Cut into rectangular sheet of paper and then press twice the leading newspapers in the Middle as shown on the picture Step 2: Use glue fixed two edge paper overlap Step 3: Fold one end securely to the bottom of the bag Step 4: You fold the side edge short and long edges paste twice in photos to form bottom bag Step 5: Wait for the glue to dry Step 6: Place treats inside the bag Step 7: Fold the remaining margin 2 cm down to form the mouth of bag Step 8: fold and glue small paper doile over the top of bag Step 9: Finally, punch holes to put Ribbon through. Voila – beautiful little gift bags! If you like this article go to the home page to see other similar posts. Like this: Like Loading...

Couture Elegance: Fashion Designs Inspired By Origami My last brief sparked an interest in using origami in designs. This inspired me to look at origami inspired designs of others. origami wedding dress created by John Galliano for Christian Dior Origami Couture dress created by designer Lisa Bigalke white dress inspired by origami Japanese art created by Sandra Backlund Fabulous origami dress created by John Galliano for Christian Dior. An origami inspired dress presented by designer Andre Lima at the Sao Paulo Fashion Week. 5 origami inspired dresses presented by designer Andre Lima at the Sao Paulo Fashion Week. Eveningwear dress designed by Georgina Hollick for Colchester Fashion. An origami creation of Nayana Sara made out of newspaper. An origami cocktail dress and pill box hat created by John Galliano for Christian Dior. A Marchesa dress inspired by origami. An origami art inspired dress created by a 16 year old girl from 1000 paper cranes. An origami covered piece of Japanese porcelain dress created by John Galliano for Christian Dior.

Susan Murray Blog: Trend Watch - Pleats and Origami The most well known Origami fold is probably the crane. In Japan, the crane symbolizes longevity and folding one thousand cranes is believed to bring your wish come true. It is very much a symbol of prayers and is often given as a good luck or get well present. Origami is a traditional Japanese folk art of paper folding, which started in the 17th century AD and was popularized in the mid 1900s (Wikipedia). Since then it has evolved into a modern art form as well as the muse for many designers and artists. Sharp lines characteristic to folded paper of Origami and the unique pattern of colors have inspired architectural designers around the world. The artists and designers of the fashion world have also taken Origami as a muse in their work. The Dior Origami Wedding Dress is probably one of the most famous Origami inspired wedding dresses out there. One can find many amazing and gorgeous dresses that have a tweak of Origami inspiration. Dresses with pleats are feminine, elegant and flowy.

paper dress It’s the right thing to do when your fashion blog has got yellow paper dress written all over it – embark on a paper dress trail, albeit in cyberspace. So, googling left me ogling over the wonderful world of “Wear and Tear” – past and present. It all started in the 1960s which, apart from being a remarkable period taking fashion to “new heights” with daring innovations such as the mini skirt – was also the beginning of the disposable fad in America. According to Wikipedia.com, paper dresses were invented by the Scott Paper Company in 1966 as a marketing tool. The company was taken aback by the overwhelming reaction with women ordering half a million of these dresses in under a year. As the trend took off, companies began to experiment with style and fabric, adding other materials to the paper to make a sturdier garment that could even be washed. Andy Warhols Souper Dress Paper dresses sounded like the next great invention – convenient, cheap and fashionable. Vivienne Tam

50 Origami-Inspired Fashion Styles By: Tana Makmanee - Published: Apr 2, 2013 • References: With fashion constantly changing within a blink of an eye, you never know what style or technique may be the next big hit, but these origami-inspired fashion styles are perfect for anyone looking to add some futuristic options to their wardrobe. Origami is often associated with paper sculptures and designs that you can make from ordinary pieces of paper. These creative fashion styles however, takes the iconic origami forms and shapes and utilizes them in all sorts of couture collections and accessories, serving to give these pieces of clothing a futuristic and striking appeal. From box-like origami heels to stunning geometric couture dresses, these futuristic fashion styles are sure to impress any fashionista looking to get the heads up on the next hottest fashion styles.

Devota & Lomba Wedding Dresses Feast your eyes on these unique wedding gowns with unusual detailing from Devota & Lomba bridal couture collection. Above: fantastical origami inspired bridal coat; below: gorgeous, airy creations wrapped with wide silk ribbons. Art attack — beautiful folding, creasing and pleating techniques on these two gowns. Something more retro – strapless gown featuring circular skirt with asymmetrical hemline. Delicious flounces — dress with ruffles that look like piped buttercream icing… mmm… But this dress takes the pretty cake — so in love with the color and ribbon accents just the right places. For more information (including a pret-a-porter collection designed by Miquel Suay) check out Devota y Lomba’s website.

Jean Paul Gaultier – Creating a Design Philosophy for Life | The Culture Concept Circle 6 0 0Share0 0 Peter Lindbergh, Jean Paul Gaultier, 2005, courtesy National Gallery of Victoria There is much more to bon vivant Parisian born creative and couturier Jean Paul Gaultier the man than meets the eye. For those used to thinking fashion as being only about fun and frivolity, he stands in direct contrast, because in so many ways he is about so much more. Jean Paul Gaultier is an artisan creator, one safeguarded, supported and well respected for both his erudition and imagination. He’s one of those rare guides in our world today who is taking us on a journey, one that will eventually far exceed our expectations as well as our current sense of ‘culture’. Fashion for Monsieur Gaultier is not only integral to his life’s journey but also the most important aspect of his personal philosophy about living his life as, and through art. An animated Jean Paul Gaultier in conversation with Thierry-Maxime Loriot, on stage at the NGV, October 2014, photo: Jo Bayley, The Culture Concept Circle

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