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Carambola Flowers by Carmen Sprung If you’ve been following me on Flickr for a while, you’ve probably seen this picture of Carambola Flowers before – I folded them ages ago! But since my Pro account is going to expire in a few days time (and I don’t feel like upgrading it again), a lot of my old photos won’t be displayed anymore. So I decided it would be a good idea to share the very best of them on my blog! These absolutely beautiful origami flowers were designed by Carmen Sprung and I just love them! Description Video tutorial presented by Sara Adams of HappyFolding.com. Tags: Carmen Sprung, Floral Make This: A Luminous Faceted Pendant Light » Curbly | DIY Design Community « Keywords: DIY, pendant, lighting, paper Remember those folded up fortune-tellers from your elementary school days? Some kids called them cootie-catchers, but I never really understood the method behind the madness with that one. But I digress, because paper folding prowess was not in vain. Take a longing glance at this beautiful DIY faceted pendant sphere, completely covered in small fortune tellers! Tagged : pendant, lighting, paper, DIY

Lucky Wishing Stars Tutorial You’ve probably seen these little puffy origami stars before. They are really quick to make, and you don’t need any special materials to make them. You can buy lucky star pre-cut strips from origami stores, but you can just as easily make your own from medium weight coloured paper, e.g. scrapbooking paper, or even strips cut from magazine pages – as the strips are so narrow, the original text or image won’t be obvious in the finished star. Anti-clockwise from top left: pre-cut strips, paper cutter, scrapbook paper, magazine page. Now on to the tutorial! To give you an idea of size, I’ve made stars in 3 different sizes to show you: blue stars (from pre-cut strips): 35cm x 1.25cmpink stars (from a magazine page): 30cm x 1cmgreen stars (scrapbook paper): 15cm x 0.6cm The finished star will be approx 1.5 x the width of your strip, so pick an appropriate size for the size of star you’d like to end up with. For the rest of this tutorial, I will be using a paper strip cut from a magazine page.

Ideas to Inspire Balloon lights tutorial Here in New Zealand we are now in the middle of winter, and when playing around with some LED fairy lights I thought I would combine my love for origami and bringing some winter sparkle to our house. And so the balloon lights were born!! Ok let’s get started with the tutorial! This is what you need for this project: Pretty paper (appr. 20 sheets, mine were 90 x 90mm) on a white or light background. Here are my 20pcs of paper after I cut them with my guillotine. Now first make a water-bomb base. With the printed side of the paper facing up, valley fold in half. After that turn 90 degrees and valley fold in half again. Now turn the paper over and do the same diagonally. Now for the last part of the water-bomb base. Use the creases you have made so far and the paper should naturally fall into this shape. Here is your finished water-bomb base. Now to make the actual balloon. Fold the corner on the left hand side (top layer only) up to the middle. Now turn over and do the other side. All done!

Kusudama Tutorial part 2 Today I am showing you part 2 of how to make a kusudama ball. You can find the first part here. In part 1, I showed you have to make the individual flowers; you should now have 12 flowers made from 60 individual petals. For part 2 you will need: 12 flowers (made from 60 petals)GlueString or a ribbonBead(s) As you might be able to see from the finished kusudama at the top of the page, I made 6 flowers from blue paper and 6 flowers from a recycled map. Start to glue the flowers together one petal at the time – this will give the nicest result. When you add the 3rd flower, there are 3 petals to connect. After you have attached all 6 flowers you end up with 2 sets of half a kusudama. I used 3 beads on the bottom. Now take one of your 1/2 kusudamas and put some glue on the top. Glue your string down, making sure it is nice and straight. That’s it! In the last photo you can see another kusudama I finished earlier. If you are having a go with this 2 part tutorial we would love to see your work!

Paper Models of Polyhedra iTeach with iPads | Innovating learning and literacy with iPads in kindergarten Origami That's Fun And Easy Origami Jewelry: delicate jewerly for that special lady in your life. If you have come to this page of the web site, then you must want to make origami jewelry! The good news is that you can easily transform your origami into wearable jewelry with minimal skill. However, you do need quite a few supplies (see list below). Quick-and-easy jewelry can be made in an hour, but jewelry that is intended for extended wear or for selling will take at least half a day to complete. Most of the time is spent waiting for glue or coatings to dry before proceeding. Tips and Hints on Making Origami Jewelry Never made jewelry before? Tools, Supplies, and Terminology Don't know the difference between a head pin and a eye pin? Sharing Have you made an exciting piece of jewelry? Shown: Fluted Diamond earrings by H Graham.

animals Top 10 Sites for Educational Games There's no denying the appeal that online games have on kids. While this might come w/ a negative stigma there are a lot of online educational games that can be found to not only enhance the joy of learning but strengthen skill sets as well. That being said I've decided to create a list of my favorite educational gaming sites on the web. Top 10 Sites for Educational Games Funbrain - One of the most popular educational gaming sites around. Not only does this site cover a variety of subjects, it caters to K-8th graders, and has nice teacher resources as well.Game Classroom - Excellent, safe, teacher approved, state standard aligned games for grades K-6.

Art Flight of Folds: Monument Modern origami is a unique sculptural art. Each origami design must be individually folded; there is no mass-production process. Compositions Origami, like music, permits both composition and performance as expressions of the art. Commercial Art Origami can be used effectively in web, print, and television advertising and I have created commissioned pieces for several print, television, and animation projects. Collector Art I do most of my work on commission, both for commercial usage and for private collectors. While most of the works shown on the website have been sold or are committed to exhibitions, I am happy to take on commissions based on any of these designs. Original design commissions are priced individually, and typically range from $500 to $3000, depending on the particular subject and its complexity. For all commissioned work please contact me for price and availability. Metal Sculptures Crease Patterns Monumental Origami Exhibitions Design Challenge

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