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DIY Design Community « Keywords: DIY, pendant, lighting, paper

DIY Design Community « Keywords: DIY, pendant, lighting, paper
Remember those folded up fortune-tellers from your elementary school days? Some kids called them cootie-catchers, but I never really understood the method behind the madness with that one. But I digress, because paper folding prowess was not in vain. Take a longing glance at this beautiful DIY faceted pendant sphere, completely covered in small fortune tellers! This project requires little more than printer paper and patience to complete, and would look stunning in an entry, a hallway, or a dining room. Visit the 3 Rs blog for a full how-to and get to folding! Tagged : pendant, lighting, paper, DIY

Balloon lights tutorial Here in New Zealand we are now in the middle of winter, and when playing around with some LED fairy lights I thought I would combine my love for origami and bringing some winter sparkle to our house. And so the balloon lights were born!! Ok let’s get started with the tutorial! This is what you need for this project: Pretty paper (appr. 20 sheets, mine were 90 x 90mm) on a white or light background. Here are my 20pcs of paper after I cut them with my guillotine. Now first make a water-bomb base. With the printed side of the paper facing up, valley fold in half. After that turn 90 degrees and valley fold in half again. Now turn the paper over and do the same diagonally. Now for the last part of the water-bomb base. Use the creases you have made so far and the paper should naturally fall into this shape. Here is your finished water-bomb base. Now to make the actual balloon. Fold the corner on the left hand side (top layer only) up to the middle. Now turn over and do the other side. All done!

Carambola Flowers by Carmen Sprung If you’ve been following me on Flickr for a while, you’ve probably seen this picture of Carambola Flowers before – I folded them ages ago! But since my Pro account is going to expire in a few days time (and I don’t feel like upgrading it again), a lot of my old photos won’t be displayed anymore. So I decided it would be a good idea to share the very best of them on my blog! These absolutely beautiful origami flowers were designed by Carmen Sprung and I just love them! Each flower is made from a single sheet of paper, not from a square though, but from a pentagon. I would recommend using fairly thick and strong paper (80-90 gsm) to fold them – Tant origami paper will be just the right choice! Description Video tutorial presented by Sara Adams of HappyFolding.com. Tags: Carmen Sprung, Floral

Omniglot - the guide to languages, alphabets and other writing systems 5 Questions to Ask Your Characters | Book-in-a-Week Many writing workshops start their sessions on character development with a sheet detailing the hero’s name, age, eye color and hair color. They then move onto his job, his hobbies, and his family background. Next they might add a picture from the Internet or a magazine which looks a little like the hero, and perhaps an image of his home or workplace. This is all useful information, and great for keeping track of details so you do not find them changing as you write. These questions can be answered in different ways. The best questions to ask about your characters are ones that will take you away from the predictable paths of family, schooling and employment, so that when you return to their everyday world, you find it enriched by the knowledge you have gained. What keeps your protagonist awake at night? If you find prompts like these helpful, Peter Elbow has a very extensive list in his guide Writing With Power . However, there is no need to turn to expensive writing guides.

Dragon - Dragon NaturallySpeaking - Nuance Dragon speech recognition software makes it easier for anyone to use a computer. You talk, and it types. Use your voice to create and edit documents or emails, launch applications, open files, control your mouse, and more. Quickly and easily capture your thoughts and ideas while Dragon helps you get more done faster. Products Whether you’re at home, school, work, or on the road, Dragon software gives you complete voice control Dragon Solutions Speech recognition tools are being used by individuals and leading organizations to streamline data collection/documentation Support & Training Whether you’re a new or experienced Dragon user, find a collection of resources to improve your Dragon experience Dragon Community Connect with with other Dragon customers to learn more about Dragon, share ideas, get news updates, and more

Valve hands over its own movie-making tools to gamers Valve is planning to release the Source Filmmaker to let gamers animate and record their own videos using the game developer's titles Valve has gained a reputation over the years not just for consistently putting out great games, but also for the slick trailers and promo videos that go along with them. But now the developer is turning the tables and handing over its own video-making tools to fans free of charge. With the Source Filmmaker, gamers will be able to direct, animate, and record their own videos as if they were shooting on location inside a video game. The new tool will allow gamers to make their own movies using the acclaimed Source game engine directly. Where the Source Filmmaker differs from most animation tools is that it acts as an all-in-one package for rendering, video editing, sound editing, motion capture, etc. The developer is currently handing out beta keys for the Source Filmmaker through the official website, with a full release planned for later this year.

Random Inn/Tavern Generator Current Settings (Because this is a set of separate images, to save the floorplans you should: press your "print screen" key (or your computer's equivalent) and then open your favorite image editor and paste the screenshot into a new image. Then crop the rest of the screen. Some word processors will also allow you to paste the screenshot and even crop it. You can also print the webpage or print it to a pdf file using free tools like CutePDF and PrimoPDF.) Key Thin Rectangle on a wall: door"S" on a wall: secret doorLarge Rectangle: tableLarge Thin Rectangle: barRectangle with a "T" or "S" or both: table or shelve or table & shelves.Circle: bar stool or chair4/5 Circle: chair next to/under table Small filled Rectangle in a larger rectangle: fireplace/hearthDashed Line: railingMany thin lines getting smaller: stairsFilled Circle: toilet/privvyFilled Triangle: wash basin Coming Soon Here's the list of planned features:

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