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Drink Can Tinwork

Drink Can Tinwork
Tinwork Embossed tinwork is sometimes used to decorate rustic style photo or mirror frames, or just to make decorative items such as Christmas tree decorations. The metal used is usually thicker (tinplate) and is normally worked with hammered tools - I wanted to try to get a similar effect, but with a bit less effort. The Most Popular ArticleOn Atomic Shrimp No, really! I created this page towards the end of October 2008. More Metalwork If this project interested you, you might also like Lost Wax Casting Safety This project makes use of very thin sheet metal that is likely to have sharp, jagged edges and is prone to springing back. Great care should be taken to avoid injury. This project probably isn't suitable for children - and certainly not without supervision. Updated Autumn 2010 - now with Video Goodness! Soft drink cans are easily recyclable as scrap metal, but I fancied trying something a little more direct - a simplified form of tinwork. Materials Finished And Better... And Better Still

Tape, Pencil and Resin: The Art of Brooks Salzwedel | Ape on the Moon:... I’m very intrigued by Californian artist Brooks Salzwedel’s unique style and approach to these delicate works, that combine nature and rigid human-made structures. It’s nice to see work that brings in different non-digital materials to what we’re used to. Using a combination of Staedler Graphite pencils ranging from 6H to 9B, tape and ‘Awful toxic resin‘, Brooks creates images that look like relics of nature and other objects frozen in time. I also love the gloomy and almost real effect that’s created by having elements between semi-transparent layers. They are also reminiscent of some of the pictures of flattened leaves you’d get in school science books. ‘When working on a piece I ask myself what images I want as the focus or in the foreground then literally draw the images on the layer that coincides with the layer in depth. ⓒ Brooks Salzweder, 2010 ‘Right now I’m working on new pieces with the use of gel mediums.

Beginners Crochet Stitches How To Today I’ll be showing you how to get started with crocheting. You’ll learn the what tools you need as well as three basic crochet stitches that will get you started creating! More instructions on different stitches coming up in future blog entries, but these will enable you to crochet a lot of things to get some practice. Supplies Checklist: Crochet Hook – Sizes vary based on the size of the gaps you want, however a standard 1/9-5.50MM needle will work well. Another good needle is the N-9.00MMYarn – The choices are limitless, but for this tutorial I will be using a very basic black yarn. Part 1: Making a Slip Knot When starting off any crochet project, you’ll need to make a slip knot. Part 2: Creating the Starting Chain Once you have your slip knot created and on your hook, you need to create the starting chain, which will be the sae in any crochet project. Part 3: Single Stitch Part 4: Half-Double Stitch Part 5: Double Stitch That’s how you get started with your crocheting hobby.

Illustrations by Daniela Uhlig | Designerscouch #thecritiquenetwork Van Gogh pie-charts This is Arthur Buxton's set of Van Gogh pie-charts; each one represents the color-distribution in a famous Van Gogh painting (can you guess which is which?) He sez, "I know you lot are fans of new ways of visualizing data. As far as I know, I've come up with a novel way of looking at colour schemes. Van Gogh Visualisation (Thanks, Arthur!) A former Cement Factory is now the workspace and residence of Ricardo Bofill... Image Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill Architect: Ricardo BofillProgram: Architectural offices /archives /model laboratory /exhibition space /Bofill's-apartment /guest rooms /gardensLocation: Barcelona, SpainTotal floor area: 3,100 square meters and gardensHouse area: 500 square metersDate Completed: 1975 There is nothing as good as an aged bottle of wine; and in this case the aged bottle of wine is a project which was completed in 1975, but is still worth mentioning! First and foremost we would like to thank our friend and founder of Room Service design store in Greece, Katerina Xynogala for providing us with the necessary information regarding The Cement Factory, which is featured in the latest Room Service catalogue. The Cement Factory was discovered in 1973, it was an abandoned cement factory and partially in ruins, comprised of over 30 silos, underground galleries and huge engine rooms; Ricardo Bofill bought it and began renovation works. sources: Room Service , Ricardo Bofill

The Artist's journey: Something to think about Pablo Picasso painted this picture when he was 15 years old He painted this picture when he was 56 Why did his painting style change? Picasso's painting style changed throughout his life time. He often began a painting by creating something realistic. The picture he ended up with was often nothing like the picture he started with. At other times he would begin by painting an abstract picture and then create a slightly more realistic picture on top of it. He never stopped drawing or painting realistic pictures, he just used them differently throughout his life. What if he had thrown each one of these paintings in the garbage every time he changed his mind? To learn more about the art and life of Pablo Picasso click here Drawing assignment Before you begin drawing: examples of his artwork. Pay particularly close attention to his drawings and paintings of faces and how they changed over time. Next, read all my posts on drawing and shading the human face and head. Rubric for face shading unit.

How to Draw a Portrait of the Head The most important part of a drawing is the start, not the finish. This tutorial will focus on how to start a portrait drawing, using basic blocking-in techniques. When drawing a portrait from life, you don’t want to just jump-in and draw. In addition, whenever I do a head study, or a portrait, I don’t start out by trying to capture a “likeness.” Here is my process for drawing portraits: 1. Mark the top of skull, not the hair, then locate the line of the chin, mark the back of the skull and two lines for the angles of the front of the skull. Look for the bone structure of the skull not the features of the face—that will come later. 2. Divide the head into thirds: one third is from the top of the head to the top of the eye socket; the second is from the top of the eye socket to the base of the nose; and the third is from the base of the nose to the bottom of the chin. Next, locate the position of the eyes and the middle of the ears. 3. 4. 5. For more drawings and tips from H.

Stan Prokopenko's Blog : How to Draw the Head From Any Angle The Basic Forms To draw the head from any angle you must first understand its basic structure. Look past all the distracting details and visualize the underlying forms. The head deconstructed into its basic forms, is a sphere as the cranium and a block as the jaw and cheek bones. A Sphere as the Cranium The sides of the head are flat, so we can slice off a piece from both sides of the ball. A Block as the Jaw and Cheek Bones Attach the shape of the jaw. Constructing From Any Angle Step 1 – Determine the angle of the ball The angle of the head is established at the very beginning of the drawing with the ball. X Axis - The up and down tilt is established by the angles of the horizontal and vertical lines in the oval. Y Axis - The direction the head is turning (left or right) is established by the width of the oval. Z Axis - The twist is established by the angle of the center line, the angle of the oval and the placement of the oval on the ball. Step 2 – Find the thirds Step 3 – Add the jaw

9 Very Common Figure Drawing Mistakes, And How to Avoid Them Over the last twenty-five years I have spent my fair share of time drawing and studying the human figure. As a result, I’ve come across several (actually, nine) common figure-drawing mistakes over and over again. Like any other art process, figure drawing is a fluid activity and impossible to pin down with exact rules—but if your goal is to create a more convincing life drawing, then these next few ideas will certainly help. Here are the nine common figure-drawing mistakes, along with their solutions: Mistake #1 – Drawing without a goal in sight More often than not, people immediately begin sketching without establishing some kind of intention in their mind first. Solution: Pause for a moment before beginning your drawing and to look at what you see in front of you. Mistake #2 – Failing to keep the figure on the page It’s always shame when heads, arms or feet get unintentionally cut out of a drawing, just because the artist has run out of room on the paper.

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