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Five Pointed Origami Star

Five Pointed Origami Star
I love that this star is neatly finished and attractive on both front and back. Update: March 2013. It has recently come to my attention that this design should be credited to Tomoko Fuse. I haven't been able to find it in a published work--can anyone confirm this? The secret? Start with a pentagon shaped piece of paper, not a square. How to make a five pointed star with pentagon shaped origami paper Start with a pentagon shaped piece of paper. Download PDF set of pentagon templates in various sizes. Fold the pentagon in half down the center of any point. Pull one flat side toward the center of the paper, keeping the center fold line aligned. When the side points intersect the fold lines as shown, stop and hold in place. Crease across the bottom, just between the fold lines. Repeat for each of the five sides. Fold each point in half, working toward the inner (small) pentagon. Flip the paper over and pinch the corners of the (small) pentagon to make sure they are well creased.

http://extremecards.blogspot.com/2009/06/five-pointed-origami-star.html

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Mio Design blog Roll system seriesparts : 30paper size : 7.5cmnot use glue(C) Mio Tsugawa Happy new year.I hope we will be able to enjoy kusudama works together this year, too! This work is easy folding and easy assembling. I'll draw the diagram as early as possible. The bottom photo is made with 90 parts.You can see these works in my gallery.Kusudama Lab - gallery アプローズ巻き巻きシリーズパーツ : 30(緑の作品は90枚組み)紙のサイズ : 7.5cmジョイントマテリアル : なし Paper Flowers Here’s a lovely assortment of paper flowers to make, I’ve organized them in a few sections for easier browsing: Bouquets & Centerpieces, Tissue Paper, Crepe, Origami and the rest under general tutorials. Many of these have free templates to download and most are surprisingly easy to make! I’ve also compiled a vintage booklet into a pdf tutorial that you can download.

Square Knot Bracelet Tutorial Knotting techniques and using fibre in jewellery are all the rage at the moment and you may well have used some sari silk, cord or ribbon in your jewellery. It can add a relaxed vibe; a softness and bountiful colour possibilities! It also allows a piece of jewellery to be made entirely without the use of metal, which could be important if designing for someone who has an intolerance (although I have used a copper clasp, you could easily replace this with clasp of a different material, or even a knotted closure). -Diagrams — Page 2 A Christmas and holiday greeting to you, your families, friends, and loved ones. Today is the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere! From one of my south-facing windows, I can see the sun following its lowest and shortest arc across the sky.

DIY Macrame Bracelet Growing up by the beach in Southern California, the ability to knot a macrame bracelet was practically a right of passage. Although those days are long behind us, we’ve never forgotten the ever-so-simple square knot technique. This time, however, we’re replacing hemp and wooden beads for more updated elements like colorful nylon cord and glossy metal charms. Happy knotting! You’ll need:

Origami Box I came across a tutorial for this origami box yesterday and couldn’t resist folding it immediately! It’s not like any other box I’ve folded before, it appears to be a rectangular box from outside but when you open it up there is another box inside – a square one! It also has a lid which closes down very tightly.

Make A Frabjous George W. Hart is a professor at Stony Brook and is one of our favorite artists, making a wide variety of stunning geometric sculptures. On his of his many works that has particularly captivated us for some time is a sculpture called Frabjous. When we realized that George had posted a template for this sculpture we dropped everything, grabbed the cardboard and hot glue, and raced to build our own. You’ll need papercraft type building materials: Paper, cardstock, or cardboard, and tape or glue. Also good scissors and/or a hobby knife with sharp blades. Origami by Andrew Anselmo - Dollar Bill Origami One of my specialties is folding with US currency, or "dollar bill" origami. US currency, regardless of denomination (and unlike traditional square origami paper) is in the proportions of 3:7, and therefore can be the basis of some interesting models. Here are some of the ones I've designed; all diagrams are in Adobe PDF format.

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