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Origami - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Minefield

Origami - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Minefield
The folding of an Origami crane Origami (折り紙?, from ori meaning "folding", and kami meaning "paper" (kami changes to gami due to rendaku) is the traditional Japanese art of paper folding, which started in the 17th century AD at the latest and was popularized outside of Japan in the mid-1900s. It has since then evolved into a modern art form. The goal of this art is to transform a flat sheet of paper into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques, and as such the use of cuts or glue are not considered to be origami. Paper cutting and gluing is usually considered kirigami. The principles of origami are also being used in stents, packaging and other engineering structures.[1] History There is much speculation about the origin of Origami. In China, traditional funerals include burning folded paper, most often representations of gold nuggets (yuanbao). The earliest evidence of paperfolding in Europe is a picture of a small paper boat in Tractatus de sphaera mundi from 1490.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origami

Related:  Origami Sonobe

Wet-folding Wet-folding bull Wet-folding is an origami technique developed by Akira Yoshizawa that employs water to dampen the paper so that it can be manipulated more easily. This process adds an element of sculpture to origami, which is otherwise purely geometric. Wet-folding is used very often by professional folders for non-geometric origami, such as animals. Wet-folders usually employ thicker paper than would usually be used for normal origami, to ensure that the paper does not tear. One of the most prominent users of the wet-folding technique was Éric Joisel, who specialized in animals, people, and mythological creatures such as fairies.

Portal:Origami The Origami Portal Origami (折り紙, origami?) (literally meaning "folding paper") is the art of paper folding. The goal of this art is to create a given result using geometric folds and crease patterns. Kusudama Tutorial part 1 The Japanese kusudama is a paper ball made out of multiple identical origami shapes glued together. They were traditionally used as a ball for incense or potpourri but now we see them more for decoration or as a gift. Today I am showing you part 1 on how to make the Japanese traditional shape. There are many different patterns to make a kusudama ball but I find this the easiest pattern to get started. This is also the pattern I used to make the pink flowers on the tree in the banner. What you need for this tutorial is:

Easy Origami Envelope Folding Instructions - How to make an Easy Origami Envelope This is a great one - the easy origami envelope. You write your message or letter, then fold it into an envelope - all with just a single sheet of paper! Made this origami? Comment and Submit your photo using the comment box at the end of this page! Easy Origami Envelope Step 1: Start with an A4 paper (8 inch x 11.5 inch). It should work with most rectangles too. Gilad's Origami Page - Wetfolding How-to guide - Minefield Fold the model as you usually do, but with one exception. In regular folding, you may be used to putting creases in using your fingernails: In wet-folding, don't put such strong creases. Use the pads of your fingers instead.

Paper model / Papercraft Paper models, also called card models, "pepakura" or papercraft, are models constructed mainly from sheets of heavy paper, paperboard, card stock, or foam. Details[edit] This may be considered a broad category that contains origami and card modeling. Origami is the process of making a paper model by folding a single paper without using glue or cutting while the variation kirigami does. Card modeling is making scale models from sheets of cardstock on which the parts were printed, usually in full color. These pieces would be cut out, folded, scored and glued together.

Video on How to Make a Kusudama With the Carambola Flower by Carmen Sprung This Kusudama can be considered modular origami, and it is based on a beautiful flower model, folded from a pentagon and originally created by Carmen Sprung (Germany). She calls it “carambola” perhaps because of its resemblance to a cross section of a carambola –also known as star fruit. On her website, Happy Folding, Sara Adams (Germany) presents a video showing how to make a pentagon and how to fold the origami carambola. The folding process, as Sara demonstrates, is both easy and pleasing.

22: Richard Feynman is still awesome Host: Jorge Salazar Lead Producer: Mike Brennan ES 22 Producers: Deborah Byrd , Beth Lebwohl , Ryan Britton , Emily Howard Listeners hear EarthSky 22 on 22 stations, and counting Science News of the Week: Sonobe module Instuctions for making this model Below is the Sonobe unit, designed by Mitsonobu Sonobe, which I learned from Kazuyo Inoue. Above is the capped icosahedron which she made for me from this unit; you need to make about 30 units for this, but you only need six if you want to make a cube. Since this must be very well known, I'm only putting a very brief picture of how to make it. The second line of instructions gives a little more detail for the last step.

Galaxy de l'origami étoiles When my 5 yo goddaughter and I meet up, we love to hand each other our little handmade somethings. She would shower me with sweet girly drawings, scribblings, love notes, masks or a surprise “masterpiece”. Godma would usually make origami iconic symbols. Not long ago I made her a galaxy of stars, one of her favourite shapes. Kusudama Tutorial part 2 Today I am showing you part 2 of how to make a kusudama ball. You can find the first part here. In part 1, I showed you have to make the individual flowers; you should now have 12 flowers made from 60 individual petals. For part 2 you will need: 12 flowers (made from 60 petals)GlueString or a ribbonBead(s) As you might be able to see from the finished kusudama at the top of the page, I made 6 flowers from blue paper and 6 flowers from a recycled map.

Carambola Flowers by Carmen Sprung If you’ve been following me on Flickr for a while, you’ve probably seen this picture of Carambola Flowers before – I folded them ages ago! But since my Pro account is going to expire in a few days time (and I don’t feel like upgrading it again), a lot of my old photos won’t be displayed anymore. So I decided it would be a good idea to share the very best of them on my blog! These absolutely beautiful origami flowers were designed by Carmen Sprung and I just love them! Each flower is made from a single sheet of paper, not from a square though, but from a pentagon. DIY Design Community « Keywords: DIY, pendant, lighting, paper Remember those folded up fortune-tellers from your elementary school days? Some kids called them cootie-catchers, but I never really understood the method behind the madness with that one. But I digress, because paper folding prowess was not in vain. Take a longing glance at this beautiful DIY faceted pendant sphere, completely covered in small fortune tellers! This project requires little more than printer paper and patience to complete, and would look stunning in an entry, a hallway, or a dining room.

Creative Kismet » Blog Archive » little guiding stars Since the new year has started I’ve been trying to think of ways to be more kind to my self. Especially when that nasty gremlins try to creep in and stump me. I remembered this origami star video on You Tube and had to get them involved in my plan. I thought it would be fun to make a whole bunch with kind words and “you are….” phrases inside. I made 60 of them, enough to last me the whole year if I open one a week, plus a few extra just in case. I used 12 x 12 inch scrapbook paper and cut 1/2 x 12″ strips, then followed the video HERE*.

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