background preloader

Doing It Differently: Tips for Teaching Vocabulary

Doing It Differently: Tips for Teaching Vocabulary
Every Monday my seventh grade English teacher would have us copy a list of 25 words she'd written on the board. We'd then look up the dictionary definitions and copy those down. For homework, we'd re-write each word seven times. Good, now you know it. Test on Friday and never for those 25 words to be seen again. Poof. Copying definitions from the dictionary we would probably all agree is not an effective way to learn vocabulary. The truth is, and the research shows, students need multiple and various exposures to a word before they fully understand that word and can apply it. Selecting Words Ah, so many words, so little time. My first year teaching, before my tenth graders began reading Lord of the Flies, I went through every chapter and made lists of all the vocabulary words I thought they'd have trouble with, so that I could pre-teach them. When I looked at those long lists, I began to freak out. Then, here's what to do after the students pick their own words: Ranking Words Teaching Words

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/vocabulary-instruction-teaching-tips-rebecca-alber

Related:  wendykaplarVocabularyLanguage acquisitionLe vocabulaireinstruction

Great Website To Develop Students Vocabulary Technology has made it dead easy to learn a foreign language. I can still remember all the difficulties and hardships I went through when I was learning French and German and now that I see all that technology offers to students to learn a new language I just wish I had them back then it would have been not only way easier but more fun too. An important part in the process of learning a language is learning its vocabulary. The richer this latter is the more freedom and possibilities learners have in expressing themselves and communicating messages via the target language. Educational Technology and Mobile Learning has some cool web tools to help you or your students master vocabulary.

Brain-Based Learning: Resource Roundup Edutopia's list of resources, articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience. (Updated: 12/2013) Building Brain Literacy in Elementary Students, By Judy Willis, M.D. (2013) Neurologist, teacher, author and Edutopia blogger Willis discusses the benefits of teaching elementary students how their brains work. Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works, by Heather Wolpert-Gawron (2013) Blogger Wolpert-Gawron launches this three-part series by advising middle school teachers to read up on brain research with insight on how the 'tween brain works.

Inside Words Product Details Author: Janet AllenISBN: 978-157110-399-4Year:2007Media: 176 pp/paper + CD ROMGrade Range: 4-12Item No: WEB-0399 We've learned a lot in recent years about the important role vocabulary plays in making meaning, yet many teachers still struggle with vocabulary instruction that goes beyond weekly word lists. Effective vocabulary instruction is particularly vital in the content areas, where the specialized language used by insiders” often creates a barrier to understanding for those new to the subjects. Topic:Instructional Design Instructional Design (also called Instructional Systems Design (ISD)) is the practice of creating instructional experiences which make the acquisition of knowledge and skill more efficient, effective, and appealing.[1] The goal of this learning experience is to develop the skills needed to design instructional material. The content is organized according to the ADDIE model of Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation. The sequence of activities for instructional design may also be described as identifying instructional needs, identifying instructional goals, designing instruction and assessment, implementing and assessing the design, and then revising goals, design, and implementation as necessary: Introduction[edit]

Humanising Language Teaching Magazine for teachers and teacher trainers Daniela Tomatis, Italy Daniela Tomatis is a teacher at Scuola Media Villanova Mondovì, Cuneo, in the north of Italy. She is interested in vocabulary teaching and memory techniques. She enjoys trying new activities. E-mail: dan.ro@tiscalinet.it Menu Suffixes Word Formation Game Suffixes Word Formation: Practice suffixes word formation by playing this interactive ESL board game. Prefixes, suffixes and root words are great skills to learn. Students with good skills will most often be able to guess the meanings of unfamiliar words by breaking down the words using these skills. Choose whether to practice suffixes word formation by navigating a treacherous galaxy filled with green monsters, a sea filled with pirates or a river filled with crocodiles. Either way this will keep your heart pounding. Suddenly English grammar practice is no longer boring with these games.

Michael Halliday Michael Alexander Kirkwood Halliday (often M.A.K. Halliday) (born 13 April 1925) is a British-born Australian linguist who developed the internationally influential systemic functional linguistic model of language. His grammatical descriptions go by the name of systemic functional grammar (SFG).[1] Halliday describes language as a semiotic system, "not in the sense of a system of signs, but a systemic resource for meaning".[2] For Halliday, language is a "meaning potential"; by extension, he defines linguistics as the study of "how people exchange meanings by 'languaging'".[3] Halliday describes himself as a generalist, meaning that he has tried "to look at language from every possible vantage point", and has described his work as "wander[ing] the highways and byways of language".[4] However, he has claimed that "to the extent that I favoured any one angle, it was the social: language as the creature and creator of human society".[5] Biography[edit]

Learning Vocabulary Provide a description, explanation, or example of the new term. Photos and videos can be very help for explaining new words. Find public domain clipart and photos at openclipart.org and pixabay.com. Use Google to find copyright-friendly images. Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous.

Synonym Worksheets Synonyms and Antonyms Series - The Complete Guide - Save Time! View Now... Simile Exercises - Simile Synthesis - Sentence Rewriting Principles of Instructed Second Language Acquisition Download a PDF of this digest. Second language acquisition (SLA) researchers do not agree how instruction can best facilitate language learning. Given this lack of consensus, it might be thought unwise to attempt to formulate a set of general principles for instructed language acquisition. However, if SLA is to offer teachers guidance, there is a need to proffer advice, providing that it is offered in the spirit of what Stenhouse (1975) called “provisional specifications.” The principles described in this digest, therefore, are intended to provide teachers with a basis for argument and for reflection and not as a set of prescriptions or proscriptions about how to teach. They are designed to be general in nature and therefore relevant to teachers in a variety of settings, including foreign and second language situations and content-based classrooms.

The Jigsaw Classroom: Overview of the Technique Overview of the Technique The jigsaw classroom is a cooperative learning technique with a three-decade track record of successfully reducing racial conflict and increasing positive educational outcomes. Just as in a jigsaw puzzle, each piece--each student's part--is essential for the completion and full understanding of the final product. If each student's part is essential, then each student is essential; and that is precisely what makes this strategy so effective. Here is how it works: The students in a history class, for example, are divided into small groups of five or six students each. 33 Perfectly Odd Oxymorons An oxymoron is "a phrase that combines two words that seem to be the opposite of each other, for example a 'deafening silence'." (Oxford Dictionaries) An oxymoron is a compressed paradox. It is a figure of speech where a writer combines seemingly contradictory terms. You may have noticed that I used one in this blog post title.

Doing it differently looks at the way we teach vocabulary. It says that the old way of doing things may not be the most effective and gives strategies to consider when teaching vocabulary. It also provides other materials and resources for teaching vocabulary. by ttribou Jul 24

Six easy steps to follow when introducing new words - focuses on student's understanding and not teacher's "coverage". Offers different ways for students to learn. by amayberry1 Jul 2

Related:  Teaching Strategies