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Www.edutopia.org/pdfs/edutopia-teaching-for-meaningful-learning.pdf

Www.edutopia.org/pdfs/edutopia-teaching-for-meaningful-learning.pdf
Related:  Learner-Centered Instruction

Piaget's theory of cognitive development Piaget's theory of cognitive development is a comprehensive theory about the nature and development of human intelligence, first developed by Swiss developmental psychologist Jean Piaget (1896–1980). It is primarily known as a developmental stage theory but, in fact, it deals with the nature of knowledge itself and how humans come gradually to acquire, construct, and use it. To Piaget, cognitive development was a progressive reorganization of mental processes as a result of biological maturation and environmental experience. Nature of intelligence: operative and figurative[edit] Piaget noted reality in the sense of as a dynamic system of continuous change and, as such, is defined in reference to the two conditions that define dynamic systems. Operative intelligence is the active aspect of intelligence. At any time, operative intelligence frames how the world is understood and it changes if understanding is not successful. Assimilation and accommodation[edit] Sensorimotor stage[edit]

3 Ways To Kickstart Your PLN This Summer It’s summertime! This is when educators, free from the daily schedule of a classroom, can focus on professional development. More specifically, summer is a great time to network and to build your personal learning network (PLN). Free from internet filters on many campuses, take some time this summer to fire up your social media tools ( Facebook , Twitter , Ning , Pinterest , LinkedIn ). Here are three great tools and techniques you can use to build your online PLN: Find Folks On Facebook Most of us have a Facebook account. I use Facebook to follow some of my favorite Educational resources like Edudemic , EdTechTeacher , ISTE , Edutopia , and Education Week . Embrace The Power Of Twitter Twitter is by far the most prolific of Social Media tools used by educators. In order to use Twitter as an effective and engaging PLN tool, you need to figure out who to follow. Hashtags are another great way to explore ideas most relevant to your interests. Start Visually Learning On Pinterest

Research on Inquiry-Based Learning Learner-Centered Teaching Learner-Centered Teaching Phyllis Blumberg, Ph.D. Director of the Teaching and Learning Center University of the Sciences in Philadelphia 1. Most of this material comes from Blumberg, P. (2008) Developing Learner-Centered Teachers: A Practical Guide for Faculty. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. This site contains links to presentation or workshops I have done at various places over the past few years. Versions of most of these workshops have been offered repeatedly to new faculty at the University of the Sciences, at the Lilly Conference, The Teaching Professor Conference, the POD Network conference and to faculty at various colleges and universities in the USA and around the world and trainers for the United States Army. • Implementing Learner-centered approaches in your teaching • The purposes and processes of assessment: How you assess your students will impact how and what they learn. 2. Traditionally instructors focused on what they did, and not on what the students are learning. 3. 1. 2.

Education in the Age of Globalization » World Class Learners Home » World Class Learners More about the book: Why did I write the book and what is it about? How to order: Corwin PressAmazonBarnes and NobleDownload Flyer and Order Form (PDF) Prepare your students for the globalized world! In the new global economy, the jobs that exist now might not exist by the time today’s students enter the workplace. Understand the entrepreneurial spirit and harness itFoster student autonomy and leadershipChampion inventive learners with necessary resourcesDevelop global partners and resources With the liberty to make meaningful decisions and explore nontraditional learning opportunities, today’s students will develop into tomorrow’s global entrepreneurs.

Active Learning Assessments Biography of Maria Montessori | American Montessori Society Maria Montessori was an Italian physician, educator, and innovator, acclaimed for her educational method that builds on the way children naturally learn. She opened the first Montessori school—the Casa dei Bambini, or Children’s House—in Rome on January 6, 1907. Subsequently, she traveled the world and wrote extensively about her approach to education, attracting many devotees. There are now more than 22,000 Montessori schools in at least 110 countries worldwide. Maria Montessori was born on August 31, 1870, in the provincial town of Chiaravalle, Italy. Her father was a financial manager for a state-run industry. Beginning in her early childhood years, Maria grew up in Rome, a paradise of libraries, museums, and fine schools. Breaking Barriers Maria was a sterling student, confident, ambitious, and unwilling to be limited by traditional expectations for women. In time, however, she changed her mind, deciding to become a doctor instead. Birth of a Movement Innovator, Feminist, Idealist

ToniTheisen - Languages, 21st Century Skills, Common Core Languages, 21st Century Skills, Common Core Toni Theisen Loveland High School Loveland, ColoradoConnect me -Toni Theisen: email Connect with me on Twitter: tonitheisen Facebook Toni Theisen's presentation on Tuesday Essential documents and links Theisen's Tuesday Math ppt: Prsctice 6th grade math sample from Common Core Math assessments: Theisen ppt#1 Friday: Teaching Channel Common core video series: even though this videos are in English, there are great examples and examples that we can use. Several examples: SAMR model The Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition Model offers a method of seeing how computer technology might impact teaching and learning. Padagogy WheelMore Padagogy wheel Padagogy wheel poster download:padwheelposter.pdf Building the Culture of an Empowered Mindset Towards Technology Innovation Chart Technology to activate communication and transform learningI.

Inquiry-Based Approaches: What Do Students Think? June 25, 2013 By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching and Learning “Inquiry-based learning is an umbrella term, encompassing a range of teaching approaches which involve stimulating learning with a question or issue and thereby engaging learners in constructing new knowledge and understandings.” (p. 57) Teachers who use these approaches act as facilitators of learning. A second scheme categorizes inquiry-based approaches by how they are framed and whether they are discovery oriented or information oriented. In this particular analysis (part of a larger body of research), the team was interested in how students perceived these various kinds of inquiry approaches. The results contained a lot of good news. As for the different modes, open inquiry was the most highly rated in terms of the type of learning it promoted, followed by guided and then structured inquiry. Reference: Spronken-Smith, R., Walker, R., Batchelor, J., O’Steen, B. and Angelo, T. (2012).

Student-Centered Teaching In the traditional approach to college teaching, most class time is spent with the professor lecturing and the students watching and listening. The students work individually on assignments, and cooperation is discouraged. Learner-centered teaching methods shift the focus of activity from the teacher to the learners. These methods include active learning, in which students solve problems, answer questions, formulate questions of their own, discuss, explain, debate, or brainstorm during class; cooperative learning, in which students work in teams on problems and projects under conditions that assure both positive interdependence and individual accountability; and inductive teaching and learning, in which students are first presented with challenges (questions or problems) and learn the course material in the context of addressing the challenges. Videos and Publications on Active Learning Publications on Cooperative Learning General principles and strategies D.B. R.M. R.M. Dr. Return to Dr.

Assessing Student Progress Using Blog-Based Porfolios Editor’s note: Kathy Cassidy is the author of a new book from Powerful Learning Press, Connected from the Start: Global Learning in the Primary Grades. During a recent webinar (free archive here), Kathy shared many ideas from Chapter 5 of the book, “Using Blogs as Digital Portfolios.” The webinar was rich in content and full of great discussion — so much so that there simply wasn’t time for Kathy to share her thoughts, in depth, about where formative and summative assessments might fit into this digital blog/portfolio model. So we’ve asked her to write this article. Much as she does in her eBook, she’s included short videos, useful downloads, and links to other valuable resources. ~ John Norton A Great Tool to Continuously Assess Progress by Kathy Cassidy In my classroom, each of my grade one and grade two students has their own blog. Formative Assessment I am continually doing formative assessment in my classroom — that is, assessment for learning. Verbal explanations Summative Assessment

Assessment Research has repeatedly shown that assessment practices used by teachers have a significant impact on student achievement and engagement and that substantial learning gains can result from providing students with frequent feedback about their learning. Additionally, it is lower-achieving students that will benefit the most from effective summative assessments. Strong assessment practices must be woven into the continual practices of an effective learning environment, and this is especially true in an inquiry-based study. It is assessment practices that form the bridge between the learning goals and the tasks, making clear to students and teachers what should be learned. As seen in the previous chapter, having clear learning goals and conceptual frameworks are important components of inquiry. Linda Darling Hammond suggests three critical elements for assessing meaningful learning:

Theories of Cognitive Development: Lev Vygotsky. | Psycho Hawks Theories of Cognitive Development: Lev Vygotsky. November 3, 2010 at 3:00 pm For my previous post on Jean Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, click here. As with my previous post, I will explain a little about Vygotsky and his life before we look at his theory. Lev Vygotsky Born in Orsha, a part of the Russian Empire (now known as Belarus) on 17th November 1896, Vygotsky was a pioneer of psychology; he contributed much important research to the field. Vygotsky rarely conducted research; he was more focused on constructing the best possible theory on the transfer of knowledge. Vygotsky’s theory of cognitive development. As stated above, Vygotsky believed children’s thinking is affected by their knowledge of the social community (which is learnt from either technical or psychological cultural tools). He described something known as the zone of proximal development (ZPD), which is a key feature of his theory. Level 1 – the ‘present level of development’. Diagram to demonstrate the ZPD.

How does teaching for meaning teach your students to think? by teresacoffman Aug 16

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