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Brain-Based Learning: Resource Roundup

Brain-Based Learning: Resource Roundup
Edutopia's list of resources, articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience. (Updated: 12/2013) Building Brain Literacy in Elementary Students, By Judy Willis, M.D. (2013) Neurologist, teacher, author and Edutopia blogger Willis discusses the benefits of teaching elementary students how their brains work. Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works, by Heather Wolpert-Gawron (2013) Blogger Wolpert-Gawron launches this three-part series by advising middle school teachers to read up on brain research with insight on how the 'tween brain works. In her second blog, The Mind of a Middle Schooler: How Brains Learn, read about important brain terminology and a typical classroom scenario where a middle schooler's brain is hard at work.

http://www.edutopia.org/brain-based-learning-research-resources

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Building Brain Literacy in Elementary Students Practice Makes Perfect For many students, the brain isn't a hot topic of conversation. This is especially true for younger students who are still trying to understand the world around them, and are still far from developing physiological self-awareness of the very thing that gives them that self-awareness. Doing It Differently: Tips for Teaching Vocabulary Every Monday my seventh grade English teacher would have us copy a list of 25 words she'd written on the board. We'd then look up the dictionary definitions and copy those down. For homework, we'd re-write each word seven times. Good, now you know it. Test on Friday and never for those 25 words to be seen again. Pretty pictures: Can images stop data overload? 16 April 2012Last updated at 19:01 ET By Fiona Graham Technology of business reporter, BBC News Brain scan: Research suggests that one way to avoid being overloaded by data is by presenting it visually rather than text or numbers Sitting at your desk in the middle of the day, yet another email notification pops up in the corner of the screen, covering the figures you're trying to digest in the complicated spreadsheet in front of you.

Big Thinkers: Judy Willis on the Science of Learning Judy Willis: Hi, I'm Judy Willis and I am a neurologist. I've been a neurologist for 15 years and after the 15 years my patient practice really changed. I started getting so many referrals for kids whose teachers thought they had ADD, obsessive compulsive disorder, staring spells, seizures petit mal epilepsy, and the increase was huge and yet the kids had no greater incidence of it. And I saw the notes were coming from the school so I visited the schools. I'd look in the classrooms and I saw kids who indeed were playing with everything they could find, staring out the window, coloring on someone's chair or book.

How one great teacher was wronged by flawed evaluation system Principal Carol Burris of South Side High School in New York has for some time been chronicling the consequences of standardized test-driven reform in her state (here, and here and here, for example). Burris was named New York’s 2013 High School Principal of the Year by the School Administrators Association of New York and the National Association of Secondary School Principals, and in 2010, tapped as the 2010 New York State Outstanding Educator by the School Administrators Association of New York State. She is the co-author of the New York Principals letter of concern regarding the evaluation of teachers by student test scores. It has been signed by more than 1,535 New York principals and more than 6,500 teachers, parents, professors, administrators and citizens. You can read the letter by clicking here.

Critical Thinking Toolbox: How to Brainstorm Brainstorming is an essential part of critical thinking and a tool that people use to invent an idea, find a solution to a problem, or answer a question. Like: naming a puppy, or . . . Prehistoric Man: "I wonder why all the stars move around in the same way every night, except for just a few? Those few wander about from night to night." Prehistoric Friend: "Why do we need to know that?" Michael Halliday Michael Alexander Kirkwood Halliday (often M.A.K. Halliday) (born 13 April 1925) is a British-born Australian linguist who developed the internationally influential systemic functional linguistic model of language. His grammatical descriptions go by the name of systemic functional grammar (SFG).[1] Halliday describes language as a semiotic system, "not in the sense of a system of signs, but a systemic resource for meaning".[2] For Halliday, language is a "meaning potential"; by extension, he defines linguistics as the study of "how people exchange meanings by 'languaging'".[3] Halliday describes himself as a generalist, meaning that he has tried "to look at language from every possible vantage point", and has described his work as "wander[ing] the highways and byways of language".[4] However, he has claimed that "to the extent that I favoured any one angle, it was the social: language as the creature and creator of human society".[5] Biography[edit] Studies of grammar[edit] 1967–68.

Welcome To Mixed Reality 2015 is going to be remembered as the year we entered an entirely new world, a world today known as Mixed Reality. What is Mixed Reality? In short, Mixed Reality is the world which we now inhabit where real and virtual objects co-exist and can causally influence each other. In Mixed Reality persistent virtual objects can be created, seen, and manipulated and they exist and are perceived as integrated with the real world. Together with the Internet of Things where environmental objects embed computational elements, sensors, and connectivity, Mixed Reality will radically alter the way we interact with and think about the world.

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