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Physics Simulations and Artwork

Physics Simulations and Artwork
Here is a 3D view of a hydrogren atom in the 4f state. The left image was made in C++ using a technique described by Krzysztof Marczak to make it volumetric like a cloud of smoke. The right image was made in Mathematica by adding 2D cross-sectional layers. The animations were made in POV-Ray using DF3 density files. The right animation shows what a "12o" orbital might look like. POV-Ray has a built-in internal function for the 3d orbital: // runtime: 4 seconds camera{location 16*z look_at 0} #declare P=function{internal(53)}; #declare P0=P(0,3,0,0); box{-8,8 pigment{rgbt t} hollow interior{media{emission 0.5 density{function{(P(x,y,z,0)-1.2)/(P0-1.2)} color_map{[0 rgb 0][1 rgb 1]}}}}} Links Atomic Orbital - time-dependant hydrogen atom simulation, by ?

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Science links Skip to Content Home » Science links Science links Cosm's favourite internet links New particle- neutral Xi-sub-b A new sub-atomic particle has been discovered by physicists using high-energy collisions at the U.S. national laboratory Fermilab. This discovery adds one more piece to understanding the puzzle of how matter, the stuff of the universe, is formed. A look inside the tracking chamber of the Collider Detector at Fermilab

Pulse of the Nation: U.S. Mood Throughout the Day inferred from Twitter Click for high-resolution PDF version (11MB) Video A time-lapse video of the maps, cycled twice, is available below (best viewed at 720p): Mood Variations Physics Flash Animations We have been increasingly using Flash animations for illustrating Physics content. This page provides access to those animations which may be of general interest. The animations will appear in a separate window.

17 postulates related to Physics Space 1 The universe is physical space. 2 Mathematical space has no physical existence. Mass CERN traps antimatter atoms for 1,000 seconds « Eideard Haven’t your own antiproton decelerator? This is what one looks like. Researchers involved in the ALPHA experiment at Switzerland’s CERN complex announced…that they have succeeded in using the facility’s antiproton decelerator to trap antimatter atoms for 1,000 seconds – or just over 16 minutes. This was reportedly enough time to begin studying their properties in detail, which has been the goal of ALPHA since the project began in 2005… According the the Big Bang theory, when the universe was created, so were equal amounts of matter and antimatter. While matter is now everywhere in our universe, antimatter is scarce, and projects such as ALPHA are trying to figure out why.

Data visualization Data visualization or data visualisation is viewed by many disciplines as a modern equivalent of visual communication. It is not owned by any one field, but rather finds interpretation across many (e.g. it is viewed as a modern branch of descriptive statistics by some, but also as a grounded theory development tool by others). It involves the creation and study of the visual representation of data, meaning "information that has been abstracted in some schematic form, including attributes or variables for the units of information".[1] A primary goal of data visualization is to communicate information clearly and efficiently to users via the information graphics selected, such as tables and charts. Effective visualization helps users in analyzing and reasoning about data and evidence.

Five iconic science images, and why they're wrong : SciencePunk Over the years, we’ve been blessed with innumerable breathtaking images from the pursuit of science – from the unimaginably huge Pillars of Creation to the endlessly tiny Mandelbrot Fractals. But some of these images have taken on an iconic status, instantly recognisable to schoolchildren and Republican presidential candidates alike. The problem is, a lot of these iconic science images are more icon than science. Here’s a few you might have seen before. CERN traps antimatter atoms for 16 minutes A team of particle physicists at CERN's Antihydrogen Laser Physics Apparatus (ALPHA) have trapped 309 atoms of antimatter for more than a quarter of an hour. When CERN first created and trapped antimatter, back in November 2010, researchers held onto the fleeting antihydrogen atoms for just 170 milliseconds, or a tenth of a second. Antihydrogen atoms have a super short life span. As soon as they come into contact with normal hydrogen atoms the antimatter is annihilated.

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