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Physics Simulations and Artwork

Physics Simulations and Artwork
Here is a 3D view of a hydrogren atom in the 4f state. The left image was made in C++ using a technique described by Krzysztof Marczak to make it volumetric like a cloud of smoke. The right image was made in Mathematica by adding 2D cross-sectional layers. The animations were made in POV-Ray using DF3 density files. The right animation shows what a "12o" orbital might look like. POV-Ray has a built-in internal function for the 3d orbital: // runtime: 4 seconds camera{location 16*z look_at 0} #declare P=function{internal(53)}; #declare P0=P(0,3,0,0); box{-8,8 pigment{rgbt t} hollow interior{media{emission 0.5 density{function{(P(x,y,z,0)-1.2)/(P0-1.2)} color_map{[0 rgb 0][1 rgb 1]}}}}} Links Atomic Orbital - time-dependant hydrogen atom simulation, by ?

The Physics Classroom Usenet Physics FAQ Version Date: February 2018 This list of answers to frequently asked questions in physics was created by Scott Chase in 1992. Its purpose was to provide good answers to questions that had been discussed often in the sci.physics and related Internet news groups. The articles in this FAQ are based on those discussions and on information from good reference sources. Most of the entries that you'll find here were written in the days when the Internet was brand new. So because of their age, the FAQ entries that you'll find here have a great deal of academic credibility—but they are not always perfect and complete. This document is copyright. General Physics Particle and Nuclear Physics Quantum Physics Relativity and Cosmology Speed of Light Special Relativity General Relativity and Cosmology Black Holes Reference Topics There are many other places where you may find answers to your question. This FAQ is currently available from these web sites: Australia: England: Netherlands:

Amazing Scanning Electron Microscope Photos Amazing Scanning Electron Microscope Photos All these pictures are from the book 'Microcosmos,' created by Brandon Brill from London. This book includes many scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of insects, humanbody parts and household items. These are the most amazing images of what is too small tosee with the naked eye. 2-2-11 An ant, Formica fusca, holding a microchip Surface of an Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory silicon microchip Eyelash hairs growing from the surface of human skin The surface of a strawberry Bacteria on the surface of a human tongue Human sperm (spermatozoa) Nylon hooks and loops of Velcro Household dust: includes long hairs of cat fur, twisted synthetic and woolen fibers, serrated insect scales, a pollen grain, and plant and insect remains The weave of nylon stocking fibers The head of a mosquito Head louse clinging to a human hair Eight eyes (two groups of four) on the head of a tarantula Cut human hairs and shaving foam between two razor blades Mushrooms spores

100,000 Stars "Twistor" Theory Reignites the Latest Superstring Revolution: Sc In the late 1960s the renowned University of Oxford physicist and mathematician Roger Penrose came up with a radically new way to develop a unified theory of physics. Instead of seeking to explain how particles move and interact within space and time, he proposed that space and time themselves are secondary constructs that emerge out of a deeper level of reality. But his so-called twistor theory never caught on, and conceptual problems stymied its few proponents. Like so many other attempts to unify physics, twistors were left for dead. In October 2003 Penrose dropped by the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., to visit Edward Witten, the doyen of today’s leading approach to unification, string theory. Expecting Witten to chastise him for having criticized string theory as a fad, Penrose was surprised to find that Witten wanted to talk about his forgotten brainchild. Penrose’s original goal was to reconsider how quantum principles apply to space and time.

Mozilla Firefox (Build 20120905151427) Feynmann Diagrams La théorie des perturbations est un outil extrêmement pratique dans le calcul des probabilités des interactions dites faibles, dans un cadre classique (non relativiste). Par contre, lorsque l'on inclut à ce type d'interaction des particules fortement relativistes, cette théorie procure des résultats beaucoup trop compliqués à calculer, d'où l'intérêt de développer un nouvel outil permettant d'appliquer cette théorie des perturbations aux cas relativistes. Cet outil porte aujourd’hui le nom de diagramme de Feynman. Bien qu'ils permettent de visualiser les interactions entre les particules, les diagrammes de Feynman sont bien plus qu'une simple représentation schématique. Une grande partie de cet ouvrage traite de l'interaction entre deux électrons (ou positrons). Théorie des perturbations invariantes La matrice de diffusion S Supposons que l'on a un système composé de n particules qui interagissent ensemble. où ψ'=exp[iH0t]. Cette relation nous permet donc de définir la matrice S Les noeuds

This is What Happens When You Run Water Through a 24hz Sine Wave What!? How is this even possible? Because science, my friends. Brusspup’s (previously) latest video explores what happens when a stream of water is exposed to an audio speaker producing a loud 24hz sine wave. Run the rubber hose down past the speaker so that the hose touches the speaker. Brusspup did a similar experiment last year where it looked as if the water was flowing in reverse.

Physics Flash Animations We have been increasingly using Flash animations for illustrating Physics content. This page provides access to those animations which may be of general interest. The animations will appear in a separate window. The animations are sorted by category, and the file size of each animation is included in the listing. In addition, I have prepared a small tutorial in using Flash to do Physics animations. LInks to versions of these animations in other languages, other links, and license information appear towards the bottom of this page. The Animations There are 99 animations listed below. Other Languages and Links These animations have been translated into Catalan, Spanish and Basque: En aquest enllaç podeu trobar la versió al català de les animacions Flash de Física. Many animations have been translated into Greek by Vangelis Koltsakis. Most animations have been translated into Hungarian by Sandor Nagy, Eötvös Loránd University.

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