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ResearchFlow

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Download Graphic Images from the Hillis/Bull Lab Return to "Download Files" Page You are welcome to download the following graphic image of the Tree of Life for non-commercial, educational purposes: Tree of Life (~3,000 species, based on rRNA sequences) (pdf, 368 KB) A Day in the Life of NYTimes.com The New York Times R&D LabsA snapshot of site traffic to NYTimes.com on June 25, 2009. Have you ever wondered where the readers of The New York Times’s Web site come from, and what kind of devices they use to read our content? In a past life, not too long ago, when I worked in The Times’s research and development labs, we started a research visualization project to explore this very topic. I worked on these visualizations with Michael Young, Michael Kramer, and Noriaki Okada. The two videos below show the traffic to NYTimes.com on June 25, 2009, the day Michael Jackson died. The 24-hour period is compressed into a little over a minute and a half.

English Letter Frequency Counts: Mayzner Revisited or ETAOIN SRHLDCU Now we show the letter frequencies by position within word. That is, the frequencies for just the first letter in each word, just the second letter, and so on. We also show frequencies for positions relative to the end of the word: "-1" means the last letter, "-2" means the second to last, and so on. We can see that the frequencies vary quite a bit; for example, "e" is uncommon as the first letter (4 times less frequent than elsewhere); similarly "n" is 3 times less common as the first letter than it is overall. What Is Science? From Feynman to Sagan to Asimov to Curie, an Omnibus of Definitions by Maria Popova “The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious — the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science.” “We live in a society absolutely dependent on science and technology,” Carl Sagan famously quipped in 1994, “and yet have cleverly arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. That’s a clear prescription for disaster.” Little seems to have changed in the nearly two decades since, and although the government is now actively encouraging “citizen science,” for many “citizens” the understanding of — let alone any agreement about — what science is and does remains meager. So, what exactly is science, what does it aspire to do, and why should we the people care?

Hollywood Visualisation Challenge - Design shortlist We offered a massive dataset on Hollywood budgets, genres, review scores for every film from 2007-2011. We asked you to visualise the interesting stories you could find. Here’s what you came up with… Ideas Illustrated » Blog Archive » Visualizing English Word Origins I have been reading a book on the development of the English language recently and I’ve become fascinated with the idea of word etymology — the study of words and their origins. It’s no secret that English is a great borrower of foreign words but I’m not enough of an expert to really understand what that means for my day-to-day use of the language. Simply reading about word history didn’t help me, so I decided that I really needed to see some examples. Using Douglas Harper’s online dictionary of etymology, I paired up words from various passages I found online with entries in the dictionary.

Einstein for Everyone Einstein for Everyone Nullarbor Press 2007revisions 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 Copyright 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 John D. Norton Published by Nullarbor Press, 500 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 with offices in Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15222 All Rights Reserved John D. Web Trend Map 2007 Version 2.0 by Oliver Reichenstein We have done it before: the 200 most successful websites pinned down on the Tokyo Metro Map, ordered by category, proximity, success, popularity and perspective. Now we have done it again — and better. Back by popular demand: here is iA’s next Web Trend Map: Download It! We figured that this would make a nice desktop background image as well.

Search engine data visualisations I’ve decided I need a single place to put all of the search engine data visuals that I’ve been working on. The visuals are made up of thousands of actual queries put into search engines by UK users over the course of a year. This gives us an idea of ‘search demand’ which can/may/should equal actual, offline demand for a topic. Feel free to republish however please link to this blog and also to James Webb who helped to create them. They can be downloaded as PDF’s at the bottom of this page. Click the links below to open the visuals in PDF format for better quality printing / viewing.

The 13 Most Important Numbers in the Universe - James D. Stein's Cosmic Numbers In the 17th century, scientists understood three phases of matter—solids, liquids and gases (the discovery of plasma, the fourth phase of matter, lay centuries in the future). Back then, solids and liquids were much harder to work with than gases because changes in solids and liquids were difficult to measure with the equipment of the time. So many experimentalists played around with gases to try to deduce fundamental physical laws.

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