background preloader

ResearchFlow

Related:  Topics - matiere

Geography Education Blog - ifttt the beginning... I’d like to humbly announce that the first beta invites for a project I’m incredibly excited about are out the door. The project is called ifttt, shorthand for “if this then that”. With this blog I hope to begin fleshing out some of the initial inspirations that led to the inception of ifttt and provide you with a taste of how ifttt can help put the internet to work for you. A few years ago I became passionate about visualizing data and began experimenting with small projects that filtered and presented information in interesting ways. One evening, waiting in line to order Indian food, I was lost in thought about an event-driven programming problem when something clicked in a funny way. Before I get back to addressing that funny click, there was another concept that I was enthralled with at the time. These types of creative adaptations are much easier in a physical world where the useful properties of an individual object can be understood quickly. Now for that click. Jesse & Linden

The Hole NYC Download Graphic Images from the Hillis/Bull Lab Return to "Download Files" Page You are welcome to download the following graphic image of the Tree of Life for non-commercial, educational purposes: Tree of Life (~3,000 species, based on rRNA sequences) (pdf, 368 KB) (see Science, 2003, 300:1692-1697) This file can be printed as a wall poster. Tree of Life tattoo, courtesy of Clare D'Alberto, who is working on her Ph.D. in biology at the University of Melbourne. The organisms depicted in this tattoo are (starting at 4 o'clock and going around clockwise): (1) a cyanobacterium (Anabaena); (2) a radiolarian (Acantharea); (3) a dinoflagellate (Ceratium); (4) an angiosperm (Spider Orchid); (5) a couple species of fungi (Penicillium and a yeast); (6) a ctenophore (comb jelly); (7) a mollusc (nudibranch); (8) an echinoderm (brittle star); and (9) a vertebrate (Weedy Sea Dragon). Here is another great Tree of Life tattoo! Cover of Molecular Systmatics, 2nd ed Here is yet another version from Hannah Udelll at the University of Wisconson-Madisson.

The Art of Insight and Action random website dot com sScienceMap How The World Spends Its Time Online - Have you ever wondered how people across the world spend their time online? Global research firm Nielsen periodically releases data from its studies of consumer behavior online. Here are the 2010 findings regarding social networking, branding and world net usage. Total Time Online The average person spends more than 60 hours a month online. This is the equivalent of 30 straight days a year in front of a computer monitor, smart phone or other internet-capable device. Social networking accounts for 22 percent of the time while 42 percent is spent viewing content, whether watching videos, reading articles or playing online games. Among people who use the Internet, each person visits 2,646 Web pages on 89 domains and logs in 57 times per month. Most Popular Brands The percentage of all online users that visit Google is 82. Social Network Usage The highest percentage of internet users who log onto social media is in Brazil, with 80 percent using social network sites. Daily Internet Activities

Perlentaucher - Online Kulturmagazin mit Presseschauen, Rezension, Autorenliste, Feuilleton What Is Science? From Feynman to Sagan to Asimov to Curie, an Omnibus of Definitions by Maria Popova “The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious — the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science.” “We live in a society absolutely dependent on science and technology,” Carl Sagan famously quipped in 1994, “and yet have cleverly arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. That’s a clear prescription for disaster.” Little seems to have changed in the nearly two decades since, and although the government is now actively encouraging “citizen science,” for many “citizens” the understanding of — let alone any agreement about — what science is and does remains meager. So, what exactly is science, what does it aspire to do, and why should we the people care? Stuart Firestein writes in the excellent Ignorance: How It Drives Science: Real science is a revision in progress, always. Science does not purvey absolute truth, science is a mechanism. Carl Sagan echoed the same sentiment when he remarked: Later:

Related: