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H. P. Lovecraft

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Download Issues of "Weird Tales" (1923-1954): The Pioneering Pulp Horror Magazine Features Original Stories by Lovecraft, Bradbury & Many More. We live in an era of genre.

Download Issues of "Weird Tales" (1923-1954): The Pioneering Pulp Horror Magazine Features Original Stories by Lovecraft, Bradbury & Many More

Browse through TV shows of the last decade to see what I mean: Horror, sci-fi, fantasy, superheroes, futuristic dystopias…. Take a casual glance at the burgeoning global film franchises or merchandising empires. Where in earlier decades, horror and fantasy inhabited the teenage domain of B-movies and comic books, they’ve now become dominant forms of popular narrative for adults. Telling the story of how this came about might involve the kind of lengthy sociological analysis on which people stake academic careers. And finding a convenient beginning for that story wouldn’t be easy. Do we start with The Castle of Otranto, the first Gothic novel, which opened the door for such books as Dracula and Frankenstein? Debuting in 1923, Weird Tales, writes The Pulp Magazines Project, provided “a venue for fiction, poetry and non-fiction on topics ranging from ghost stories to alien invasions to the occult.”

Related Content: S. T. Joshi - Blog. August 7, 2016 — Paula Guran on Lovecraft My attention has been drawn to Paula Guran’s anthology The Mammoth Book of Cthulhu (Running Press, 2016).

S. T. Joshi - Blog

I will review the actual contents of the book in a separate review; for now I wish to address some peculiar features of her introduction, titled “Introduction: Who, What, When, Where, Why …” I do not believe Paula Guran is unalterably hostile to Lovecraft; if that were so, it would turn her compilation of several Lovecraftian anthologies into lamentable instances of opportunism; and I would never wish to believe that of her. Her introduction, aside from a fair sprinkling of errors and some hilarious typos (“Lovecraft started school in 1889”—a year before he was born!) , is on the whole neutral and generally praiseworthy in singling out Lovecraft’s distinctiveness as a writer of weird fiction. But, to be honest, it reads largely like a freshman English term paper. Or is Guran thinking of the few women who do appear in Lovecraft’s fiction? Egad! A New History of the Horror Story: From Homer to Lovecraft. The below essay, by attorney and writer Leslie S.

A New History of the Horror Story: From Homer to Lovecraft

Klinger, is taken from the introduction to In the Shadow of Edgar Allan Poe: Classic Tales of Horror, 1816–1914, a new anthology devoted to recovering those horror writers who are obscured by the looming shadow of Edgar Allan Poe. In his introduction, Klinger locates the origin of the “tale of terror” not in Poe — as is often claimed — but in Homer. Next, Klinger threads his history of horror through its “flowering” in the late 18th century, in effect providing a sensible context for what would become the modern horror story.

In Klinger’s narrative, Poe’s work, as well of that of his disciples, is made all the more fascinating because it is placed in a new context — a new history of horror. Lovecraft's Fiction - Publication Order. Below is a list of Lovecraft’s fiction, revisions, collaborations, and miscellaneous minor works, in the order they were published.

Lovecraft's Fiction - Publication Order

It is based primarily on S.T. Joshi’s H.P. Lovecraft and Lovecraft Criticism: An Annotated Bibliography, but includes some changes based on Mr. Joshi’s ongoing research. This list is also available in both alphabetical order and chronological order. Copyright status of works by H. P. Lovecraft - The H.P. Lovecraft Wiki - Wikia. H.P.Lovecraft copyright status There is controversy over the copyright status of many of the fiction works of american horror writer H.P.Lovecraft , especially his later works.

Copyright status of works by H. P. Lovecraft - The H.P. Lovecraft Wiki - Wikia

Lovecraft had specified that the young R. H. Barlow would serve as executor of his literary estate, but these instructions had not been incorporated into his will. Nevertheless his surviving aunt carried out his expressed wishes, and Barlow was given charge of the massive and complex literary estate upon Lovecraft's death. Barlow deposited the bulk of the papers, including the voluminous correspondence, with the John Hay Library. All works published before 1923 are public domain in the U.S. Questions center over whether copyrights for Lovecraft's works were ever renewed under the terms of the U.S.

In those Berne Convention countries who have implemented only the minimum copyright period, copyright expires 50 years after the author's death.