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The 10 most filling foods for weight loss. Study shows charitable giving fell during the Great Recession. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images There are lots of reasons why private philanthropy can't replace the government safety net, but one of the most fundamental is that people tend to stop giving to charity right when the poor need it most.

Study shows charitable giving fell during the Great Recession.

Total donations plunged in the U.S. during the Great Recession, for instance, dropping 7 percent in 2008, and 6.2 percent in 2009. When the economy turned south, Americans closed their wallets. Jordan Weissmann is Slate’s senior business and economics correspondent. This week, researchers from Texas A&M University are out with a new working paper asking why. To find out, the team, led by economist Jonathan Meer, looked at data from the federal government's Survey of Income and Program Participation, tracking more than 13,000 people over time. Meer, Miller, Wulfsberg* This isn't exactly a shocking result, but it has at least a couple implications.

*Correction, Dec. 5, 2016: A photo credit in this post originally misspelled Elisa Wulfsberg’s last name. The Cure For Election-Related Stress? Believe Your Political Adversaries Can Change. It’s no exaggeration to say that the U.S. has just experienced the most polarizing, contentious, and bitterly fought presidential election in recent memory.

The Cure For Election-Related Stress? Believe Your Political Adversaries Can Change

It’s taken a toll on the minds of many: A survey by the American Psychological Association last month showed that the 2016 presidential election was a source of significant stress for more than half of all Americans. Research has shown that stress can have long-lasting effects on the brain; it can create changes in gene expression and impair immune function. But psychologist Kelly McGonigal says the biological response of stress is triggered by our outlook—the idea that someone or something “out there” is a threat to us. The solution is to believe our political adversaries can change. The belief in the possibility of change, McGonigal says, can eliminate stress by removing the thing we judge as harmful. The Stigma Of Doing Things Alone.

I was discussing prospective travel plans with a group of people the other day when one of them, after expressing her interest in visiting Lyon, remarked, “But I have to find someone to go with — I’m not going to travel there by myself.

The Stigma Of Doing Things Alone

Nobody wants to do that.” The same afternoon, I walked into a cafe with a friend to grab lunch. Upon seeing an acquaintance there eating solo, my friend commented, “Aw, he’s by himself. Maybe we can say hi. No one should have to eat alone. Why So Many White American Men Are Dying. The rising mortality rate of middle-age white Americans can be traced directly to the rise in prescription opioids. $14.99 Print & Digital 3 Month Trial Weekly home delivery with free shipping, access to Newsweek’s website and the complete online archive.

Why So Many White American Men Are Dying

Try Print & Digital WILL RENEW AT $39.99/QUARTER $4.99 Digital Only 3 Month Trial Access to Newsweek’s website and the complete online archive. Try Digital Only WILL RENEW AT $12.99/QUARTER. PNAS 2015 Case 1518393112. Now White People Are Dying From Our Terrible Economic Policies, Too. This post originally appeared at The Nation.

Now White People Are Dying From Our Terrible Economic Policies, Too

It wasn’t supposed to end this way. But this week America learned that the folks everyone thought had it better than most are suffering a fate just as bad as the rest of us, and by some measures, even worse. A demographic analysis of public health trends in recent years shows that middle-aged whites are living more miserable and sicker lives — and also appear to be dying at a higher rate. From 1999 to 2013, Princeton University researchers observed a disturbing jump in deaths among whites aged 45 to 54. For other groups, including seniors and middle-aged blacks and Latinos, mortality fell, continuing positive health and demographic trends of the past few decades. Overall, non-Latino white midlife mortality ticked up by 34 deaths per 100,000. “The narrowing of the black white mortality gap could be thought of as leveling down.” How does this figure into the public discourse on race and health?

Your work or a life: a painful choice no one should have to make – Hands-On Fundraising. In the United States, recent polls found that 70 percent of American workers consider their workplace a significant source of stress, whereas 51 percent report job stress reduces their productivity.

Your work or a life: a painful choice no one should have to make – Hands-On Fundraising

(via PsychCentral) Do we have to choose? A month or so ago, I read this article in the New York Times by Anne-Marie Slaughter about our toxic work world. The article stayed in my mind. But I’ve been wrestling with how to write about it. I wasn’t surprised to read public health experts are concerned about stress. The article points out that in our culture, the people who succeed are healthy, young and free from family obligations. The author cites a “distinctive American pathology of not making room for caregiving.” The reality today is that most children live in households where both parents work.